Boxing  

Forum Home Boxing Forum European British Classic Aussie MMA Training
Go Back   Boxing News 24 Forum > Boxing > Boxing Training/Amateur Boxing


Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 12-01-2012, 10:25 AM   #1
Marcos Avellan
newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 18
vCash: 500
Thumbs up Super Recovery Techniques

[Only registered and activated users can see links. ], along with his brother David, founded South Florida's Freestyle Fighting Academy (FFA) in 2001, and has trained fighters for the UFC, WEC, Bodogfight, EliteXC, Strikeforce, and dozens of other promotions. He is a writer for the website [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] and is a leading expert in combat mental training.

Recovery is a huge part of training and combat. Fights can take minutes, even hours, and yet nobody can truly hit a straight out five minute sprint with everything they got… it is during lulls in combat that one can recovery.

In training, we have rest periods. Rest periods could be a simulation of resting during actual combat – but they are also necessary for giving us more energy so that we can continue pushing past our walls. That being said, it is useful to make our breaks seem as close to a real combat break as we can.

Here are some tips for handling breaks. First of all, don’t make a big deal out of them. The mentality you should have is that you never “need” a break. If the situation demands it, you should be ready to keep going without any breaks. The break is a luxury. When you are granted a break, you shouldn’t be making a huge drama over it. You shouldn’t be bending over at the waist, or laying on the floor, or showing very visible signs of fatigue.

The mind and body are connected. If your body is bending over at the waist, your face is contorted from exhaustion, and your breathing is irregular and out of control… what is your body communicating to your mind? I’ll give you another example… if you had to be $1,000 on who was the best student in a high school class and have to pick between two students… one student is sitting perfectly upright, with pen in hand, looking up at the professor taking notes… or the other student, who is slouching in his chair, has a facial expression like he’d rather be somewhere else, and is breathing out sighs every time the teacher talks while he keeps checking the clock… which one would you bet on has better grades? Probably the upright and attentive one… because although he may have worse grades (the other kid could be a genius) you have already developed a subconscious understanding that body language does speak volumes about what the mind is like. The way the mind feels influences the body and the way the body feels influences the mind – it is a cycle. As a fighter, you are starting to feel fatigued and weak, then you will want to break the cycle and start feeling great… and the easiest way to break the cycle is to have the body posture and external behavior of someone that feels great.

How does a champion that feels great look? They are upright, they have controlled breathing, their face is determined, they make eye contact, and they got a bounce to their step… if you physically do all these things… no matter how your mind may think you feel… you will notice an immediate difference. The contrary, which is bending over at the waist, showing weakness in your facial expressions, panting uncontrollably, and looking away from your opponent… these send the mind into a tailspin of fatigue and weakness.

I learned an excellent training exercise on recovery from Master Lloyd Irvin, Jr., trainer of BJJ and UFC World Champions. While his guys are sparring or grappling hard, during the rest periods, rather than pacing around or bending over, he has his competitors meet at the center, nose to nose, totally upright, and make eye contact… yes, a ruthless stare down! Do you know what happens with these stare downs? AN ENERGY BURST! There is no way you can straighten up and stare your opponent in the eye and not get hyped up! If you try this experiment, you will notice the quicker recovery time as well… because the body is posturing itself in a way that the mind associates with feeling ready to fight.

Most live combat resting occurs in clinches and on the ground. Sometimes it happens from the feet as well – but usually this form of resting is mutual. If one man is trying to rip off the other man’s head from standing… it is hard for the passive man to “rest” on his feet. However, if both guys are tired, they may take a minute or so of mutual dancing around and throwing pitter patter jabs to rest up for a bit. However, with clinches and takedowns, one can force the lull in action on their opponent – he doesn’t need his consent to rest.

Sometimes a rest is necessary to recharge for more violence. Sometimes you may have gotten rocked by a hard punch and need a rest simply to get your bearings back. Either way, when it is time to rest, you need to get the most out of it. You can’t be uncomfortable while in the clinch and expect to get recovery rest. Why? Because whenever you are uncomfortable you are tense… and whenever you are tense, your muscles are in contraction… and when your muscles are in contraction, they are sucking the oxygen out of your bloodstream – which is going to accelerate fatigue. That is why in boxing, it is crucial to stay relaxed while striking… if your shoulders are crunched up and your strikes are stiff – you will gas fast. When deciding to rest for a moment in the clinch against the fence or on the ground, you need to be relaxed.

A way to get used to this style of rest is to do so in training. Rather than have one minute rests where people go to their corner in the ring during sparring training… simply have them rest in a clinch or on the ground, while throwing pitter patter punches. This way they associate these positions with recovery positions and expect to have more energy as a result because that is the way they gain energy in training. For striking, an alternative style of this active rest would be to have your strikers shadow boxing, throwing jabs and longer range punches while having an emphasis on footwork… this way when he is resting on his feet in combat, dancing around throwing jabs, he will associate this with recovery rest as well. This is a much more realistic training alternative than the old fashioned… “TIME! One minute rest…” and then everybody just sitting around waiting for the bell to ring again.

I can keep on going on this topic but we’ll stop here for now. Come back to this site and stay tuned for my next article! If you would like to learn more, you can visit my site at [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

Sincerely,
Marcos Avellan
[Only registered and activated users can see links. ]
1-888-FFA-GYMS
Marcos Avellan is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old 12-01-2012, 10:29 AM   #2
viru§™
Belt holder
ESB Addict
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 4,143
vCash: 1000
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcos Avellan View Post
I learned an excellent training exercise on recovery from Master Lloyd Irvin, Jr., trainer of BJJ and UFC World Champions. While his guys are sparring or grappling hard, during the rest periods, rather than pacing around or bending over, he has his competitors meet at the center, nose to nose, totally upright, and make eye contact… yes, a ruthless stare down! Do you know what happens with these stare downs? AN ENERGY BURST! There is no way you can straighten up and stare your opponent in the eye and not get hyped up! If you try this experiment, you will notice the quicker recovery time as well… because the body is posturing itself in a way that the mind associates with feeling ready to fight.
This would be interesting to test.
viru§™ is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 10:35 AM   #3
Marcos Avellan
newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 18
vCash: 500
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

Try it, it works. However, as a coach, you will need to drop everyone for push-ups the first few times. When you first do it, people will snicker and crack jokes, etc. A natural reaction to diffuse the inevitable tension. So the first time someone laughs or something, you drop everyone down for push-ups and explain why... then have them come up and do it again - they always then take it serious. The results are instant, test it out. Do the usual 30 second rest but holding the staredown the whole time. Let me know how it goes.

And the way I preframe them is something like this... "If you can't staredown your training parter here, how are you going to react when opposite of a champion that wants to tear your head off? Are you going to crack jokes?" and that usually gets them into the right mindset.
Marcos Avellan is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 10:40 AM   #4
dealt_with
Belt holder
ESB Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,182
vCash: 500
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

There's a physiological reason for people bending at the waist and resting their hands on their hips, it allows oxygen to move around more easily.
dealt_with is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 10:48 AM   #5
Marcos Avellan
newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 18
vCash: 500
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

I'm willing to argue that the psychological benefits of remaining upright will easily overcome and physiological benefits of bending over. Bending over is not a combative stance... it is a "we are done" stance. Whether or not blood is pumping easier or not is irrelevant since you are communicating to your body and mind to shut down.

That is my opinion at least.
Marcos Avellan is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 11:14 AM   #6
dealt_with
Belt holder
ESB Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,182
vCash: 500
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcos Avellan View Post
I'm willing to argue that the psychological benefits of remaining upright will easily overcome and physiological benefits of bending over. Bending over is not a combative stance... it is a "we are done" stance. Whether or not blood is pumping easier or not is irrelevant since you are communicating to your body and mind to shut down.

That is my opinion at least.
Psychological effects are dependant on if you believe they are. If you believe that your posture between rounds matters then it will, your opponents beliefs count as well. Most people need to calm down during combat to slow their heart rate and be more metabolically efficient, not become more aroused. As long as you don't see bending over at the waist and breathing heavily as a sign of weakness then it won't affect you negatively. If you believe it is a sign of weakness it will have the opposite effect you're talking about. When you're in a fight it's unusual for you to have to tell your body and mind to go, generally speaking people are too aroused and that impairs fitness and recovery. Everybody has a different level of optimal arousal and how the athlete perceives that arousal is correlated to successful performance.
dealt_with is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 11:31 AM   #7
viru§™
Belt holder
ESB Addict
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 4,143
vCash: 1000
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

Quote:
Originally Posted by dealt_with View Post
Psychological effects are dependant on if you believe they are. If you believe that your posture between rounds matters then it will, your opponents beliefs count as well. Most people need to calm down during combat to slow their heart rate and be more metabolically efficient, not become more aroused. As long as you don't see bending over at the waist and breathing heavily as a sign of weakness then it won't affect you negatively. If you believe it is a sign of weakness it will have the opposite effect you're talking about. When you're in a fight it's unusual for you to have to tell your body and mind to go, generally speaking people are too aroused and that impairs fitness and recovery. Everybody has a different level of optimal arousal and how the athlete perceives that arousal is correlated to successful performance.
I agree with Marcos.

Try walking down the street hunched over, head down, shoulders rounded forward. You'll feel far less confident than someone walking with their chest out and head held high. It's a natural alpha male characteristic, it doesn't matter what you try and think it means. I know this is different to being in a fight, but posture definitely tells your body something, nothing to do with psychology.
viru§™ is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 11:46 AM   #8
dealt_with
Belt holder
ESB Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,182
vCash: 500
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

Quote:
Originally Posted by viru§™ View Post
I agree with Marcos.

Try walking down the street hunched over, head down, shoulders rounded forward. You'll feel far less confident than someone walking with their chest out and head held high. It's a natural alpha male characteristic, it doesn't matter what you try and think it means. I know this is different to being in a fight, but posture definitely tells your body something, nothing to do with psychology.
Well actually it's everything to do with psychology, perception. There's nothing objective about any of these matters, if you perceived that walking around hunched over was an alpha male characteristic then I'm sure you'd feel more confident walking around hunched over. It is an evolutionary thing walking around trying to make yourself look bigger but it all comes down to what you personally believe that makes the biggest difference.
dealt_with is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 11:50 AM   #9
viru§™
Belt holder
ESB Addict
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 4,143
vCash: 1000
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

Quote:
Originally Posted by dealt_with View Post
Well actually it's everything to do with psychology, perception. There's nothing objective about any of these matters, if you perceived that walking around hunched over was an alpha male characteristic then I'm sure you'd feel more confident walking around hunched over. It is an evolutionary thing walking around trying to make yourself look bigger but it all comes down to what you personally believe that makes the biggest difference.
Not if it's hardwired into you. We're still animals at the end of the day. Most fights start with posturing. Again, hardwired into us as we evolved. You'll naturally feel more intimidated by a male with good posture over a guy with bad posture. Again, evolution.

No matter how many times you tell yourself you feel confident hunched over looking down at the ground you won't feel confident, anyone that says they do is lying to you and themselves.

Last edited by viru§™; 12-01-2012 at 12:00 PM.
viru§™ is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 12:18 PM   #10
Marcos Avellan
newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 18
vCash: 500
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

Correct Virus... it is super hard wired, as in millions of years of evolution. You can watch any animal fight and know who is the victory afterward just by their body posture. Millions of years of associating being bent over with finishing an endeavor is definitely hard wired.

You can try to re-wire millions of years of evolution or simply embrace it by keeping an upright, ready posture. If being bent over is a great posture, imagine if a fighter were bent over panting in the middle of a round, trying to get in a few extra seconds of so-called optimum rest... that wouldn't translate well, wouldn't it? For the same reason it wouldn't translate in the middle of combat, it doesn't translate well seconds before engaging into combat.
Marcos Avellan is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 01:37 PM   #11
captain hook
Contender
ESB Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: ZGB - Croatia
Posts: 584
vCash: 1794
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

very interesting training methods. nice !
captain hook is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 02:18 PM   #12
scrap
Belt holder
ESB Addict
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 2,716
vCash: 1000
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

Quote:
Originally Posted by dealt_with View Post
Psychological effects are dependant on if you believe they are. If you believe that your posture between rounds matters then it will, your opponents beliefs count as well. Most people need to calm down during combat to slow their heart rate and be more metabolically efficient, not become more aroused. As long as you don't see bending over at the waist and breathing heavily as a sign of weakness then it won't affect you negatively. If you believe it is a sign of weakness it will have the opposite effect you're talking about. When you're in a fight it's unusual for you to have to tell your body and mind to go, generally speaking people are too aroused and that impairs fitness and recovery. Everybody has a different level of optimal arousal and how the athlete perceives that arousal is correlated to successful performance.
I think thats Spot On.
scrap is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2012, 03:12 PM   #13
democritus2k
newbie
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 0
vCash: 500
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

For post training recovery, I prefer a therapeutic massage followed by a happy ending. ****in works every time for me at least.
democritus2k is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2012, 12:00 PM   #14
Hammer Muldoon
Contender
ESB Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 626
vCash: 500
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

Quote:
Originally Posted by dealt_with View Post
Psychological effects are dependant on if you believe they are. If you believe that your posture between rounds matters then it will, your opponents beliefs count as well. Most people need to calm down during combat to slow their heart rate and be more metabolically efficient, not become more aroused. As long as you don't see bending over at the waist and breathing heavily as a sign of weakness then it won't affect you negatively. If you believe it is a sign of weakness it will have the opposite effect you're talking about. When you're in a fight it's unusual for you to have to tell your body and mind to go, generally speaking people are too aroused and that impairs fitness and recovery. Everybody has a different level of optimal arousal and how the athlete perceives that arousal is correlated to successful performance.
So i should become aroused before i fight?
Hammer Muldoon is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2012, 10:07 PM   #15
dealt_with
Belt holder
ESB Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 3,182
vCash: 500
Default Re: Super Recovery Techniques

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer Muldoon View Post
So i should become aroused before i fight?
That's a Dad level joke, very poor mate
dealt_with is offline  Top
Reply With Quote
Reply

Boxing News 24 Forum > Boxing > Boxing Training/Amateur Boxing

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump





All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:06 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Boxing News 24 Forum 2013