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Old 05-05-2009, 09:04 AM   #1
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Default Aust. Boxing Classics.

Boxing has been reported in Australia for close to 200 years. I hope this allows a few to indulge in memories, opinions and details of the greats o' yesteryear. Names like Foley, Jackson, Griffo' etc..
Memories of the 40's, 50's, 60's etc are just as prevelant and worth reading.
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Old 05-05-2009, 10:44 AM   #2
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Default Re: Aust. Boxing Classics.

Guys, a great quote was said "If you shake a family tree hard enough, a boxer will fall out soon enough". A.T.

The Famechon Family Tree is a big example.

We best know Johnny Famechon, former WBC F/W champion (recognised by "The Ring Magazine" as champ also) for his 'hit and not be hit' style, for the majority of us its from footage only.

For the modern man, Famechon may be somewhat illicet as Champ.. He only won the WBC F/W title?? When taking into account his actual performances and credits, a better picture can be painted.

The name "FAMECHON" was synonymous with boxing for years in France, Europe, USA and Australia. When its dicected, approx 15 countries may be involved with the name.

Johnny is perhaps our best loved fighter from the last generations, and out of the Famechon family tree he fell. He had charisma, class, a tight-lipped mouth, pure boxing style with great science, anotomical credibility and a defence worthy of his trainers accolades.

For his worth, Fammo is underpriced. With the Famechon name having mention for close to 20 years in the pages of European boxing, its little wonder why a 5 year old boy, fresh to Richmond, Victoria would assume a different roll in life.

In a basic view, Fammo was a class fighter from early on. Having not engaged in any Amatuer bouts, his 'apprenticeship' in Boxing, beginning mid-1961 and lasting through mid 1964 was a great test of value. Fighting through the 3, 4, 6, and 8 round prelims, he'd proven his values to Festival Hall and Ambrose Palmer en-route.

For Palmer, Fammo and Australian Boxing.. little was to brag about at this point. Come the end of 1964, an Australian Featherweight title was placed around the waist of Fammo, having conquered the brother of Oympian Wally Taylor... that being Ollie Taylor for the F/W crown, in November of that year.

This is where I'd like to hear stories and tales begin.

Considering names of recent/current referees and judges were not far from being opponents of Johnny Famechon at that point.

Last edited by flamengo; 05-05-2009 at 11:01 AM.
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Old 05-05-2009, 10:53 AM   #3
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Default Re: Aust. Boxing Classics.

Oh... those names being Billy Males and Max Murphy..
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Old 05-05-2009, 05:01 PM   #4
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Default Re: Aust. Boxing Classics.

Looks like some good history in Australia's Top 25 Boxer's of All Time

By Tony Nobbs: This country has a boxing great tradition with eleven Aussie pugilists holding major world championships. I will count down my top 25 of Australian boxers in history (imports not included) over the coming weeks.

25/ Fred Henneberry (Middleweight champion of Australia): Born in Port Pirie, South Australia in 1911. Based out of Sydney. Turned pro in 1930, at 18, drawing his first bout before winning next twenty. Suffered first defeat over 15 rounds on points to Russ Critcher (50-7-3) in 1931 but beat Critcher over fifteen in an immediate rematch. Once stopped the great welterweight Jack Carroll but lost returns. He fought the master Ambrose Palmer on three occasions (1-2)and squared off against the brilliant Ron Richards an amazing ten times, drawing twice, winning three (1 by knockout) and being disqualified’d five times! In a US trip in 1939, he drew with George Abrams (27-3) over eight rounds at Madison Square Garden, being penalized two points which cost him the nod. Abrams, in the next two years, twice beat world welterweight champion Billy Soose, drew over ten with Charley Burley, considered the best fighter never to win a world championship and go fifteen rounds with the Man Of Steel Tony Zale for the middleweight championship of the world. In 1947 Abrams lost a spilt nod to Sugar Ray Robinson. Back in Sydney in 1940, Fred was controversially stopped in round seven by Archie Moore (42-4-4) who went on to become the greatest world light heavyweight champion in history – after the referee indicated the “No Foul” rule (the Australian could not continue after a low blow).Twice reigned as Middleweight champion of Australia (beating Palmer and Richards for titles) and challenged Palmer for Lt Heavyweight honors. Last fought in 1941, a DQ against Richards. Overall record: 60-19-6, 31 ko’s. Died in 1997. Like all rated above him, would be a world champion today.

24/ Lester Ellis (IBF junior lightweight/super featherweight champion of the world - 1985):

Born in Blackpool, England in 1965. Trained by his brother Keith – Victoria’s “Trainer of the Century”. A pencil thin whip, who was a three time Australian amateur champion “The Master Blaster” turned professional in 1983 when he realised he would be by passed for selection to the Los Angeles Olympic Games. Aided by promoter Cos Sita, he rose fast. Won Comonwealth junior lightweight crown out pointing Zambia’s John Sichula (14-0-1) in November ’84 at Melbourne Festival Hall. At same venue on February 15, 1985, in his fifteenth paid bout, became IBF junior lightweight champion of the world winning a verdict over Hwan Kil Yuh (25-1-3). Though it was officially a split decision, Lester was a decisive winner, with the Korean judge giving it to his countryman. Reign was short. Made one successful defence, a dramatic KO 13 over Filipino puncher Rod Sequenen (43-9-3)again at Festival Hall. Next up lost the title by decision to his former idol, the mercurial Barry Michael (44-8-3) on July 12 at the Hall. Better wins he had in future years were – KO 8 Rafael Solis (30-4-2), W 10 Tony Miller (19-1-1), W 10 ex WBA lightweight world champ Ernesto Espana (36-6), KO 6 Dale Artango (18-1), KO 5 Pat Leglise (30-4-1), KO 1 Rod Sequenan (54-14-4 -Sequenan later went the distance with world champs Roger Mayweather, Carlos Gonzales and James Page in the US), W 10 Iwao Otomo (17-1-2) and W 12 Tony Laing (13-3-1) for C/Wealth light welter laurels. He won the National lightweight strap against the dazzling Artango in 1987. At one stage Lester was number one mandatory contender for hall of famer Azumah Nelson’s WBC super featherweight crown, but, while he won three IBO world belts in as many weights and one WBF, losses at crucial times kept him from another shot at a major championship. Last fought in 2002 when halted in three rounds in Melbourne by Anthony Mundine (13-1), at super middleweight (17 kilo / 2 st 10 lb / 34 lb from his IBF title days). That was his first bout since a KO by 4 defeat to ex IBF featherweight boss and Jeff Fenech conqueror Calvin Gove (48- in 1996. Overall record: 41-8, 22 ko’s.

23/ Trevor King (Featherweight champion of Australia): Born at Cessnock, NSW, 1930. A true fighter. Overcame illness (was paralyzed by rheumetic fever )as a child to produce one the greatest records of any Australian pugilist before or after him. Turned pro in 1946 winning first 41 fights before losing to Sigi Tennenbaum in 1952. Defeated Tiggenbaum on points over fifteen the same year for the NSW featherweight strap. Defeated local top liners Johnny Wheler, Bluey Wilkins and Ray Mustard Coleman with his biggest scalp being that of the unfortunate but still world class knockout artist Elly Bennett (36-12-1, 32 ko’s), who he widely outscored in 1953. Was due to fight for the British Empire (Commonwealth) featherweight title but was involved in an accident while riding his motorcycle. Had one more fight, in 1960, beating New Zealand lightweight title holder Mike Corless , KO 5, but then suffered a serious head injury in a car accident. Overall record: 63-1, 37 ko’s. Later became a Salvation Army Minister.

22/ Charkey Ramon (Commonwealth light middleweight champion): Born David Ballard in Gulgong, NSW in 1950. Trained by my first mentor ,the venerable Bernie Hall in Sydney. Named by Bernie – “Charkey” after the African American boxer, “Ramon” after the Mexican fighter. A top amateur. Turned professional in 1970 and had his last fight in 1974. 1972 was his big year. He out pointed former Australian middleweight champion Dick Blair, then won the National light middleweight strap knocking over Paul Lovi (14-3-2) in three rounds in June, knocked out future Aussie super middle champ Joe Vella in two heats and got off the deck to be crowned Comonwealth champion by stopping Englands Pat Dwyer (33-8-2) in round eight in October. Got to number one in the world and was closing in on a title shot when he retired due to a damaged shoulder. Only loss was to Fred Etuati, who he gave away ten pounds. Final record: 33-1-1, 22 ko’s. Later became a top referee,was involved in the infamous brawl on the first – and last – boxing promotion at the Sydney Opera House, promoted by league icon Tommy Raudonikas in 1982.

21/Rocky Mattioli (WBC super welter/light middleweight champion): Born in Ria Teatine, Italy, in 1953. Named Rocco after Rocky Marciano who visited his hiome town the day he was born. Migrated to Australia age five. A Victorian amateur champion, silver medalist at Nationals in 1969, turned pro in 1970. Stocky, stood a touch under 5’7. Won Australian welterweight belt, KO 12 over Jeff White in 1973. Losses to Ali Afakasi (KO by 12) and New Yorker Harold Weston (L10) did little to halt his progress. He beat former world welter boss Billy Backus (who upset the legendary Jose Napoles) and became WBC super welterweight champion of he world when he knocked out German Eckhard Dagge (20-3-1) in five rounds in Berlin, on August 6, 1977- in his 54th professional outing. Retained twice (also had three non title wins) with KO 7 over Angelo Dundee trained former world champ, Elisha Obed (67-4-4) and KO 5 Jose Manuel Duran (63-6-9). Lost throne to Antiguan born Englishman Maurice Hope in nine rounds in 1979. Lost a challenge to Hope in 1980, in eleven rounds. Remained in world top ten until he retired in 1982 winning his last four by knockout. Overall record: 64-7-2, 51 ko’s.

Next week 20-16.
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Old 05-06-2009, 05:02 AM   #5
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Default Re: Aust. Boxing Classics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ashley View Post
Looks like some good history in Australia's Top 25 Boxer's of All Time

By Tony Nobbs: This country has a boxing great tradition with eleven Aussie pugilists holding major world championships. I will count down my top 25 of Australian boxers in history (imports not included) over the coming weeks.

25/ Fred Henneberry (Middleweight champion of Australia): Born in Port Pirie, South Australia in 1911. Based out of Sydney. Turned pro in 1930, at 18, drawing his first bout before winning next twenty. Suffered first defeat over 15 rounds on points to Russ Critcher (50-7-3) in 1931 but beat Critcher over fifteen in an immediate rematch. Once stopped the great welterweight Jack Carroll but lost returns. He fought the master Ambrose Palmer on three occasions (1-2)and squared off against the brilliant Ron Richards an amazing ten times, drawing twice, winning three (1 by knockout) and being disqualified’d five times! In a US trip in 1939, he drew with George Abrams (27-3) over eight rounds at Madison Square Garden, being penalized two points which cost him the nod. Abrams, in the next two years, twice beat world welterweight champion Billy Soose, drew over ten with Charley Burley, considered the best fighter never to win a world championship and go fifteen rounds with the Man Of Steel Tony Zale for the middleweight championship of the world. In 1947 Abrams lost a spilt nod to Sugar Ray Robinson. Back in Sydney in 1940, Fred was controversially stopped in round seven by Archie Moore (42-4-4) who went on to become the greatest world light heavyweight champion in history – after the referee indicated the “No Foul” rule (the Australian could not continue after a low blow).Twice reigned as Middleweight champion of Australia (beating Palmer and Richards for titles) and challenged Palmer for Lt Heavyweight honors. Last fought in 1941, a DQ against Richards. Overall record: 60-19-6, 31 ko’s. Died in 1997. Like all rated above him, would be a world champion today.

24/ Lester Ellis (IBF junior lightweight/super featherweight champion of the world - 1985):

Born in Blackpool, England in 1965. Trained by his brother Keith – Victoria’s “Trainer of the Century”. A pencil thin whip, who was a three time Australian amateur champion “The Master Blaster” turned professional in 1983 when he realised he would be by passed for selection to the Los Angeles Olympic Games. Aided by promoter Cos Sita, he rose fast. Won Comonwealth junior lightweight crown out pointing Zambia’s John Sichula (14-0-1) in November ’84 at Melbourne Festival Hall. At same venue on February 15, 1985, in his fifteenth paid bout, became IBF junior lightweight champion of the world winning a verdict over Hwan Kil Yuh (25-1-3). Though it was officially a split decision, Lester was a decisive winner, with the Korean judge giving it to his countryman. Reign was short. Made one successful defence, a dramatic KO 13 over Filipino puncher Rod Sequenen (43-9-3)again at Festival Hall. Next up lost the title by decision to his former idol, the mercurial Barry Michael (44-8-3) on July 12 at the Hall. Better wins he had in future years were – KO 8 Rafael Solis (30-4-2), W 10 Tony Miller (19-1-1), W 10 ex WBA lightweight world champ Ernesto Espana (36-6), KO 6 Dale Artango (18-1), KO 5 Pat Leglise (30-4-1), KO 1 Rod Sequenan (54-14-4 -Sequenan later went the distance with world champs Roger Mayweather, Carlos Gonzales and James Page in the US), W 10 Iwao Otomo (17-1-2) and W 12 Tony Laing (13-3-1) for C/Wealth light welter laurels. He won the National lightweight strap against the dazzling Artango in 1987. At one stage Lester was number one mandatory contender for hall of famer Azumah Nelson’s WBC super featherweight crown, but, while he won three IBO world belts in as many weights and one WBF, losses at crucial times kept him from another shot at a major championship. Last fought in 2002 when halted in three rounds in Melbourne by Anthony Mundine (13-1), at super middleweight (17 kilo / 2 st 10 lb / 34 lb from his IBF title days). That was his first bout since a KO by 4 defeat to ex IBF featherweight boss and Jeff Fenech conqueror Calvin Gove (48- in 1996. Overall record: 41-8, 22 ko’s.

23/ Trevor King (Featherweight champion of Australia): Born at Cessnock, NSW, 1930. A true fighter. Overcame illness (was paralyzed by rheumetic fever )as a child to produce one the greatest records of any Australian pugilist before or after him. Turned pro in 1946 winning first 41 fights before losing to Sigi Tennenbaum in 1952. Defeated Tiggenbaum on points over fifteen the same year for the NSW featherweight strap. Defeated local top liners Johnny Wheler, Bluey Wilkins and Ray Mustard Coleman with his biggest scalp being that of the unfortunate but still world class knockout artist Elly Bennett (36-12-1, 32 ko’s), who he widely outscored in 1953. Was due to fight for the British Empire (Commonwealth) featherweight title but was involved in an accident while riding his motorcycle. Had one more fight, in 1960, beating New Zealand lightweight title holder Mike Corless , KO 5, but then suffered a serious head injury in a car accident. Overall record: 63-1, 37 ko’s. Later became a Salvation Army Minister.

22/ Charkey Ramon (Commonwealth light middleweight champion): Born David Ballard in Gulgong, NSW in 1950. Trained by my first mentor ,the venerable Bernie Hall in Sydney. Named by Bernie – “Charkey” after the African American boxer, “Ramon” after the Mexican fighter. A top amateur. Turned professional in 1970 and had his last fight in 1974. 1972 was his big year. He out pointed former Australian middleweight champion Dick Blair, then won the National light middleweight strap knocking over Paul Lovi (14-3-2) in three rounds in June, knocked out future Aussie super middle champ Joe Vella in two heats and got off the deck to be crowned Comonwealth champion by stopping Englands Pat Dwyer (33-8-2) in round eight in October. Got to number one in the world and was closing in on a title shot when he retired due to a damaged shoulder. Only loss was to Fred Etuati, who he gave away ten pounds. Final record: 33-1-1, 22 ko’s. Later became a top referee,was involved in the infamous brawl on the first – and last – boxing promotion at the Sydney Opera House, promoted by league icon Tommy Raudonikas in 1982.

21/Rocky Mattioli (WBC super welter/light middleweight champion): Born in Ria Teatine, Italy, in 1953. Named Rocco after Rocky Marciano who visited his hiome town the day he was born. Migrated to Australia age five. A Victorian amateur champion, silver medalist at Nationals in 1969, turned pro in 1970. Stocky, stood a touch under 5’7. Won Australian welterweight belt, KO 12 over Jeff White in 1973. Losses to Ali Afakasi (KO by 12) and New Yorker Harold Weston (L10) did little to halt his progress. He beat former world welter boss Billy Backus (who upset the legendary Jose Napoles) and became WBC super welterweight champion of he world when he knocked out German Eckhard Dagge (20-3-1) in five rounds in Berlin, on August 6, 1977- in his 54th professional outing. Retained twice (also had three non title wins) with KO 7 over Angelo Dundee trained former world champ, Elisha Obed (67-4-4) and KO 5 Jose Manuel Duran (63-6-9). Lost throne to Antiguan born Englishman Maurice Hope in nine rounds in 1979. Lost a challenge to Hope in 1980, in eleven rounds. Remained in world top ten until he retired in 1982 winning his last four by knockout. Overall record: 64-7-2, 51 ko’s.


Next week 20-16.
Did you retype this or is it a copy?

Australian boxing history is interesting depending on who is telling the story? Robert Drane I will give it a read and see how I go.
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Old 05-06-2009, 05:20 AM   #6
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It's a nice addition none the less Ashley, as an opinion of one person will be argued by others when listing top 3 -100 fighters anywhere. The 'nobbs' top 25 will be as open as Madonnas legs for debate... but it does/will create information for others in the summation of OUR great fighters.

Has the entire list been made available, if so, others will be able to fill in the top 20 from that list, and see how it compares????
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Old 05-06-2009, 06:32 AM   #7
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Default Re: Aust. Boxing Classics.

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Originally Posted by one in a million View Post
Did you retype this or is it a copy?

Australian boxing history is interesting depending on who is telling the story? Robert Drane I will give it a read and see how I go.
Who make the 'short list' of Aussie boxing authers/scribes Mel???

Lawless, Mitchell, Ryan, Swanwick, Park, Thomas, Roberts, Power, Williams, "The Chipper", Quill, Anderson, Will, Wheatley, Casey, Myles..??

Any fav's you have??
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Old 05-06-2009, 10:35 AM   #8
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Default Re: Aust. Boxing Classics.

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It's a nice addition none the less Ashley, as an opinion of one person will be argued by others when listing top 3 -100 fighters anywhere. The 'nobbs' top 25 will be as open as Madonnas legs for debate... but it does/will create information for others in the summation of OUR great fighters.

Has the entire list been made available, if so, others will be able to fill in the top 20 from that list, and see how it compares????
It looks like he will do 5 each week.....I just did the old copy and paste from the main page....I guess anybody could give the top 20 a go.
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Old 05-08-2009, 08:02 AM   #9
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Default Re: Aust. Boxing Classics.

For those with any interest...

Was in the midst of some of our former greats today, having taken a visit to the Melbourne General Cemetary. 8/5/09. Interesting feeling to walk around and look for the graves of notables. An old mate encouraged me to do so, and its a fkn great thing to do again. This time with a little more knowlege and appreciation than 'our' visit 18 years ago.

There's a great list of names, all having creditable reasons for rememberance.

Bill Lang. He faught Tommy Burns for the world H/W title. Also the only white man to take on Jack Johnson, Sam langford and Sam McVea. Not to forget he took on 3 world champs... Johnson, Burns and Fitzsimmons. Both Johnson and Fitz before and after the Champions tenure. Jack Johnson also used Lang as his sparring partner when in Oz.

James 'Tut' Ryan. Former H/W champ of OZ. June 1901- Sept 1901.

Bill Farnan. He belted the ribs out of Peter Jackson in 4 rounds, in 1884.. This bout was Australias first 'official' H/W title under 'Queensbury Rules'. Unfortuantely, Bill Farnan was dead at 39 y/o. Peter Jackson had to chase the fat arse feeble champ, John L. Sullivan for a bout... to no avail.

Archie Kemp. 20th Sept. 1949. His demise at the hands of the great Jack Hassen was a sad end to a promising career. Thankfully, his grave is now restored. Interestingly, his father died less than 12 months later. Robert Kemp, 10th May, 1950..aged 60. Archie's mum only saw another 3 years. 4th April, 1953. Very tragic.

Jack McGowan. He was a triple Australian Champ with a tough exterior. Aust Bantam champ 1890, Feather champ, 1894 and Lightweight Champ in 1909.. Not a bad career at all. Effects of the game must have caught up with him, and he was 'felled' by a light punch at the Melbourne Uni.,which caused his death the following day.

I've been taken to task, and asked to write a 'book' of sorts on Jack.. Its just a shame the Vic. State Library wont let me enter with an esky of Bourban. Will give it a shot anyway.

Dan Creedon. This bloke was another AUSSIE freak... from n.z!!! LOL. Dan was the Aust M/W champ having belted Starlight Rollings in 1891. He defended 4 times (3 ko's and a 23 round draw.) Fighting the likes of the original Joe Walcott thrice, Bob Fitzsimmons and Jack Root, he's a rare gem. He's buried beside his old mate 'Starlight' also.

If anyone is in Melb, and would like to view the graves/pay respects... just P.M me.

The great Walter Lindrum is also there, with a Billiard Table Grave bed.

Last edited by flamengo; 05-08-2009 at 10:27 AM.
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Old 05-09-2009, 07:11 PM   #10
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Default Re: Aust. Boxing Classics.

"Was in the midst of some of our former greats today, having taken a visit to the Melbourne General Cemetary. 8/5/09. Interesting feeling to walk around and look for the graves of notables. An old mate encouraged me to do so, and its a fkn great thing to do again. This time with a little more knowlege and appreciation than 'our' visit 18 years ago"

I become a bone yard cruiser in Stanley Tasmania by accident.
I was just going for a walk & saw these old headstones with a bit of history on them,, & I was hooked.

It's can be an amazing experience if you let your mind & imagination wander.

Standing at the foot of Evo Owens (Owen machine gun) grave here in Wollongong gave me a buzz. What his gun done for our troops, ironically, saved a lot of diggers lives.

Great work Flamenco
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Old 05-10-2009, 12:20 AM   #11
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Its definately a rewarding thing Rodin... Mickey Tollis, Ambrose Palmer and Frankie Flannery are just up the road from me. I was less intrigued seeing these plots, as I'd spent a little time with Flannery and Tollis in their last years.

Oh well, we are going to fall off the perch one day.
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Old 05-10-2009, 01:10 AM   #12
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I was on a ship down at south wharf & we were painting the ships side.
We were skylarking in a boxing mode (If you like) & this bloke says something about our styles.
I looked at him & says, "That sounds very much like the voice of experience"
He sticks out his hand & says "I'm Mickey Tollis"
"Well I'll be buggered. You fought Vic Patrick" I says.
(When I was a Kid, Vic was THE man)
I continued, "I've sailed with a couple of your old foes. Red Lobley & Jack "Trunky" Wilson"

What a gentleman. We got nothing done for the next half hour.

Mickey Tollis. Legend.
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Old 05-10-2009, 01:35 AM   #13
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Mate, did he nearly break your fingers when you shook hands??? I dont think he knew his own strength!!!!

Meeting these blokes, Patrick, Tollis, Henneberry, Flannery etc. is a great thing. Patrick was a hell of a charactor...He was still a hard old man in his 80's, and spoke his mind. Will get a few pics reproduced and send them to ya.
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Old 05-10-2009, 10:50 PM   #14
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Default Re: Aust. Boxing Classics.

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Its definately a rewarding thing Rodin... Mickey Tollis, Ambrose Palmer and Frankie Flannery....
Had a chat to an older guy at the boxing a week or so back. Said he went to the fights at the stadium regularly as a kid onwards, and the greatest fight he remembers was Flannery v Hasson at Festival Hall, in the early 50's.

He started peeling punches off and his eyes lit up when he spoke of Flannery!

Have seen footage of Flannery and what a crazy little guy he was! He seemed to love insighting the crowd too, and I remember one of his quotes "Same price to cheer or jeer mate".
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Old 05-11-2009, 06:29 AM   #15
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Had a chat to an older guy at the boxing a week or so back. Said he went to the fights at the stadium regularly as a kid onwards, and the greatest fight he remembers was Flannery v Hasson at Festival Hall, in the early 50's.

He started peeling punches off and his eyes lit up when he spoke of Flannery!

Have seen footage of Flannery and what a crazy little guy he was! He seemed to love insighting the crowd too, and I remember one of his quotes "Same price to cheer or jeer mate".
Great stuff CHB. Frankie and the likes, when condensing their lifes into quotes, stories etc., makes for some great reading. These guys are the truest of characters, making money to live, fighting and entertaining and not giving 'a shit' about about the back slappers. They took themselves into the ring and behaved the same outside.... Extra qualities were seen on the outside of the ring, that made them 'no more and no less' the same person. No 'Jeckle & Hyde' scripts!!
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