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Old 07-12-2007, 10:11 AM   #1
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Default Dutch Sam

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Born:
1775
Died: 1816
Induction: 1997
Dutch Sam

This phenominal little battler was known for his "iron fists." He was born Samuel Elias, in the Petticoat La., England, in the same town as fellow hall of famers Jackie "Kid" Berg and Ted Lewis. He had unbelievable strength for a man who stood 5'6" and never weighed more than 135 pounds. His physical power and long arms enabled him to fight men up to 168 pounds. Sam's first fight was recorded on Oct. 12, 1801. His power is legendary and is considered one of the hardest hitters of all time. Some have credited Sam with the invention of the uppercut. His frequent use of, and success with the punch, popularized it.
His tremendous courage, amazing endurance and iron hands made him a crowd favorite. Pierce Egan, the most famous historian of his time said, "'terrific' is the only way to describe him."
Two of Sam's more noteworthy opponents were Caleb Baldwin and Tom Belcher, who was the brother of Jem Belcher. Both Baldwin and Belcher were undefeated at the time he fought them. Sam knocked out Baldwin and decisioned Belcher.
At age 35 he was worn out by his career and hard-drinking. He retired May 31, 1810, nine years after his first fight, at 35. Six years later he returned to the ring but was beaten by William Nosworthy.
His son, Young "Dutch" Sam, was also a good puncher and very exciting fighter, had a noteworthy career in the 1820s.




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Sam, Dutch


Samuel Elias

A member of the International Boxing Hall of Fame, Dutch Sam is considered by many to be the greatest small man in early boxing history. Standing only 5'6", he never fought at more than 134 pounds (a lightweight), but his considerable punching power allowed him to fight larger opponents. In an era when most boxers fought 20-25 times in a career, Dutch Sam had approximately 100 bouts, losing only twice. Sam came from the Whitechapel area of London that later produced legendary Jewish fighters [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] and [Only registered and activated users can see links. ].

Birth and Death Dates:
b. April 4, 1775 - d. July 3, 1816

Career Highlights:
Dutch Sam began his professional career in the early 1800s as a bare-knuckled fighter in the era of "Broughton's Rules." Established in 1743 by Jack Broughton, considered the father of English boxing, the Rules stated that wrestling moves about the waist were allowed, but a fighter could not hit an opponent once he was down. In fact, knockdowns marked the division of rounds as the downed fighter had 30 seconds to return to the center of the ring or he would lose. If the fighter, with the help of his handlers, made it to the center, the fights resumed in what was considered a new round. In this way, fights were recorded according to the number of rounds and amount of time. "Broughton's Rules" were replaced in 1838 by the Pugilistic Society's "London Prize Ring Rules."
Called "one of (if not) the best fighting man in the kingdom," by early boxing historian Pierce Egan in Boxiana or Sketches Of Ancient and Modern Pugilism, Sam was discovered as a boxer on October 12, 1801 by Harry Lee. On that day, Sam defeated a boxer named Baker, a man much larger than he, on the roadside outside of Ensfield and won a prize of five guineas. Success soon followed as Sam defeated a heavyweight named Bill Shipley (called the Champion of Broadway) in 1803 in only 15-minutes, becoming [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] successor as hero of England's Jewish community. Egan wrote, "among his own persuasion (the Jews) he is an object of great notoriety; and no money is ever wanting to back him upon any pugilistic occasion."
Nicknamed 'The Man with the Iron Hand,' it was written that Sam's punches, "are truly dreadful to encounter." On August 7, 1804, near Highgate in London, he fought his first major bout when he encountered a bigger, more experienced, and undefeated boxer named Caleb Baldwin. Baldwin was favored at the beginning of the bout, and by the third round, Sam was ready to give in. His seconds refused to allow him to retire and pushed him back to the center of the ring a number of times. By the 20th round, Sam gained some momentum as Baldwin began to falter, but in the 26th-round, "both the combatants were so completely exhausted, as not to be able to stand up..." Eleven rounds later, the bout finally ended when Baldwin gave in with Sam winning a prize of 25 guineas, as well as the title of lightweight champion of England (according to some accounts).
The following year in August, Sam entered the ring with a man from Bristol named Bill Britton and defeated him in 30 rounds, winning a prize of 50 pounds sterling. His next big test came on February 6, 1806 at Mousley Hurst against Tom Belcher for the prize of 50 guineas. The bout, which began with even odds, went 57 rounds and the betting went back and forth as the two men battled before Belcher gave in and Sam emerged victorious. The following July, the two men fought again as Belcher's friends proclaimed him superior in the first bout despite the loss. Backed by former Jewish fighters [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (his second), and [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] (bottle-holder), Sam was determined to prove he was the better man.
The rematch began began well, with both competitors on top of their game. Historian Pierce Egan wrote, "a better round [fifth] was never witnessed in any fight whatever -- science, activity, and bottom [unquenchable spirit], were all upon the alert." As the fight continued, the two men battered each other, but Sam appeared the stronger of the two. In the 33rd round, the bout appeared over when, "Tom's exhausted appearance was visible...his blows were of no effect, and he fell from complete inability to proceed." Belcher managed to get up and began fighting again, but fell after missing with a punch in the 34th round. Sam had been swinging at Belcher at the same time and happened to hit Tom when he was on his knees. The cry of "foul" was heard immediately, but the officials disagreed whether or not it was a foul. After drawing on precedents, the bout was called a draw and Sam and Belcher agreed to fight again.
The third bout with Belcher took place a month later on August 21, 1807 near Crawley in Sus***. Sam showed his greatness in the bout as he dominated early (betting was four to one in his favor in the ninth-round) and then in 11th, "Sam's blows were dreadful, and Belcher's face and body suffered materially, when he fell from weakness." By the 21st-round, Sam was battering Belcher against the ropes and in the final rounds, "...it was evident to the spectators that Belcher could not win. The ferocity of Sam was tremendous in the extreme; he followed his opponent to all parts of the ring, putting in dreadful facers and body-blows, dealing out death-like punishment, till his brave opponent fell, quite exhausted." The bout lasted 36-rounds and Sam earned the 50 pounds sterling prize.
In the late 1800s, Sam was the best lightweight fighter in England, defeating Bill Cropley in 25 minutes on May 10, 1808, and Ben Medley in 52 minutes and 49 rounds at Mousley Hurst on May 31, 1810. He retired from the ring, but continued to train the same way as when he fought, drinking three glasses of gin taken three times every day. In December 1814, despite warnings from a physician that he faced death if he boxed again, Dutch returned to the ring after getting into a dispute with Bill Nosworthy while drunk. Nosworthy had already defeated Jewish boxer [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] that year, and London Jewry backed Sam to regain their honor. Wasting away from drink, Sam lost that bout to the younger and heavier Nosworthy much to the chagrin of England's Jews. He died less than two years later at the age of 41; the gin was generally held most responsible.
Despite his final defeat to Nosworthy, Dutch Sam's reputation and place in history as one of the two greatest Jewish fighters of the "pioneer" era -- along with [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] -- remains intact. Many historians believe that Sam was the first fighter to use the uppercut, and he is a member of the International Boxing Hall of Fame, and the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. Sam's son was also a boxer known as Young Dutch Sam, and they are credited with being the first professional father-son team active in the ring. Sam's wife was Christian and Young Dutch Sam drifted away from the Jewish community after his father's death (he was eight-years old when Dutch Sam died).

Origin:
London, England

Physical description:
5'6", 130-134 pounds



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Old 07-12-2007, 10:29 AM   #2
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Default Re: Dutch Sam

The first of the pound for pound greats.
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Old 07-12-2007, 10:33 AM   #3
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Default Re: Dutch Sam

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Originally Posted by janitor
The first of the pound for pound greats.
Mendoza might also qualify, although Humphries was close to the same size.
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Old 07-12-2007, 03:23 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cross_trainer
Mendoza might also qualify, although Humphries was close to the same size.
Mendoza for sure.

Mendoza, Daniel

An eighteenth century legend, Mendoza continues to be one of the most fabled fighters to ever compete in a ring. The first Jewish boxer to become a champion (1792-1795), Daniel introduced the modern science of boxing, with an approach that included footwork, sparring, defense, and strategy that replaced the brutal slugging of the previous era. Although a natural middleweight (5'7", 160 pounds), Mendoza fought heavyweights, and became champion by learning to keep his bigger opponents at a distance as he moved about the ring. In the process, Mendoza changed the sport. He observed in 1820 that "I think I have a right to call myself the father of the science, for it is well known that prize fighting lay dormant for several years. It was myself and [Richard] Humphries who revived it in our three contests for supremacy, and the science of pugilism has been patronized ever since."


The late 18th Century was a time of social and political upheaval. Boxing was gaining widespread acceptance, and Mendoza became boxing's first superstar. A hero to England's Jewish community, Mendoza's status in English society as a national cult figure made him one of the most influential Jews in history. A book titled The 100 Most Influential Jews of All Time ranks Mendoza No. 82, the highest-rated athlete on the list; he is considered more influential than Harry Houdini, Marc Chagall, and Bob Dylan, among others. The descendant of Portugese Jews, he spoke Hebrew and insisted on being billed as "Mendoza the Jew." In 1812, boxing historian Pierce Egan wrote in his study, Boxiana, that Mendoza was not "the Jew that Shakespeare drew, yet he was that Jew."

Birth and Death Dates:
b. July 5, 1764 - d. September 3, 1836

Career Highlights:
From his youth, Mendoza got into fights, as he defended fellow Jews from the insults and threats of their gentile neighbors. He lost a job as a glazier when he thrashed his boss's son in a fight. Then, while working in a tea shop, Mendoza defended his employer against a disgruntled porter who appeared ready to attack. Only 16 years old at the time, Daniel defeated the porter in 15 minutes. Among the surprised spectators was Richard Humphries, "The Gentleman Boxer," who felt he had discovered a worthy protege.


Humphries trained Mendoza for the lad's first prize fight, which took place in 1784. Mendoza defeated Harry The Coalheaver in 40 rounds; the time was 1 hour and 58 minutes. He lost a bout to Tom Tyne in 1786, but he then beat Sam Martin -- in 20 minutes -- in April 1787. While training for his next fight, Mendoza had a falling out with his mentor Humphries. On September 9, the two men got into a public argument at the **** Tavern in Epping Forest, and went out back to settle things, but were stopped by police. Four months later, on January 9, 1788, they fought in a ring, and drew an amazing crowd of 60,000 people. The bout was considered a terrific fight while it lasted; but to his disappointment, Mendoza slipped in the 28th minute and sprained his ankle, causing him to concede the contest.

"The Gentleman Boxer" taunted his former protege after the fight by calling him a coward. Mendoza responded that he would not fight again until his ankle was fully healed. This incensed Humphries, and their feud became famous throughout England. Mendoza spent the next year perfecting an innovative style of defense. In an era that allowed wrestling moves above the waist, and in which rounds were marked by knockdowns, Mendoza used sidestepping, a straight left, and special guarding techniques that his critics called "cowardly." More perceptive observers understood that Mendoza, smaller than most of his opponents, was developing a defense that capitalized on his speed. This technique allowed him to rise to the top of his profession. He not only became England's first national celebrity; he also changed boxing forever. In the process of doing so, Mendoza defeated his nemesis, Humphries, in convincing fashion.

The Mendoza-Humphries rivalry, one of the most famous in the early history of boxing, showcased the effectiveness of Mendoza's scientific approach in the ring. In May 1789, Mendoza and Humphries fought their long-awaited rematch at Stilton, Huntingdonshire, in an amphitheater built especially for the bout. Ignoring Humphries' taunts, Mendoza was patient as he dominated the fight, closing Humphries' right eye, and cutting him above the left eye. Humphries was literally blinded, and swallowed quite a bit of blood before falling -- without being hit -- in the 65th round, after 50 minutes. The demand for a third and decisive meeting resulted in the two fighters meeting once more, in September, 1790. Again Mendoza proved the better man, achieving victory after 72 rounds (1 hour and 13 minutes). Humphries retired after the bout. But if it was the end of his career, it was the launching of Mendoza the Jew.
In 1787, Mendoza mixed with royalty when he became the first boxer to win the patronage of the Prince of Wales (later to become King George IV). After defeating Humphries the second time, he also became the first Jew to ever speak to King George III. Mendoza's acceptance by royalty helped elevate the position of Jews in English society. In 1792, his reputation was enhanced further, when he claimed the heavyweight championship after Ben Brain retired. Mendoza subsequently cemented his claim by defeating Bill Warr in only 23 rounds that May.
Hailed as a British hero, Mendoza's achievements countered the stereotypes of English Jews typified by Shakepeare's Shylock in The Merchant of Venice. He spent three years as champion, touring Scotland and Ireland, and teaching the art of boxing to Celts and English nobles alike. Mendoza was the first to make boxing socially acceptable. In April 1795 though, his reign ended when he lost the title to "Gentleman" John Jackson. Mendoza's skill had steadily declined, and he faced a much larger opponent in the 5'11", 203-pound Jackson, who was able to walk through Mendoza's defense. Overwhelmed, Mendoza was punished severely; in the ninth-round, Jackson grabbed him by his hair and beat him senseless. Mendoza returned for one more round, but the bout was over in a little over ten minutes.

Following his loss to Jackson, Mendoza retired from the ring. He ran his boxing academy, but unsuccessful business decisions forced him to make a comeback. In March 1806, Mendoza defeated Harry Lee in 53 rounds for a prize of 50 guineas, and then travelled the country giving exhibitions before settling down in Kensington to run a tavern. He fought once more -- in 1812, at the age of 56 (!), against Tom Owen. In what was apparently an old grudge match, Mendoza lost in only 15 minutes. He retired for good after that fight, and remained a British icon until his death in 1836. In his later years, Mendoza wrote his memoirs, the first ever written by a boxer.

In 1954, 190 years after his birth, in an America he had never seen, Mendoza was officially named one of the inaugural group of boxers elected to the Boxing Hall of Fame. He was also selected to the inaugural class of the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990, and is a member of the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.

Origin:
London, England

Physical description:
5'7", 160 pounds
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