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Old 11-11-2007, 02:40 AM   #1
JohnThomas1
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Default Arguello - Busceme

Pretty scrappy fight this one. Busceme proved awkward for quite a few rounds before Arguello finally caught him with something substancial. Left hooks mainly did the damage. Even the finish was a bit scrappy, but the final right hand was pretty conclusive even if Bubba didn't know he should have been on the canvas. Arguello - one of histories biggest punchers hidden behind a patient calculating style.
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Old 11-11-2007, 09:52 AM   #2
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Default Re: Arguello - Busceme

I love watching Arguello.Such a patient fighter.And his body attack is so underrated.
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Old 11-11-2007, 05:25 PM   #3
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Default Re: Arguello - Busceme

Bubba Busceme fought a very smart fight against Arguello, and I agreed with "Flash" Gordon that the southpaw was pitching a shutout going into the fatal round six.

The judges of course actually had Alexis leading, probably just because of who he was. Otherwise, the only reason I could see for them to be scoring the bout against Busceme was because his aggression might have been rendered ineffective by Arguello's diligent efforts to slip under the multiple jabs Bubba was flicking from his elbow.

Frankly, Busceme boxed Arguello much as I would have tried to do if I was in his shoes. Having finally seen some footage of Winky Wright, it seems to me that a similarity could be drawn between the two of them. Bubba continually rushed Alexis, then tried peppering him with his flicking right, but not expending enough force behind his blows to punch himself out. Busceme's obvious intention was to try stealing a hometown decision over El Flaco Explosivo, rather than try taking him out, or even attempt to hurt him. He'd watched Elizondo try to inflict serious damage on Arguello with his forceful aggression and dedicated body attack, and Alexis busted his jaw and nearly decapitated him fighting off the ropes. Busceme wisely kept the action in ring center (from what I recall anyway).

Unfortunately for James, Arguello knew exactly what he was trying to pull off, and Alex could write the book on how to handle a southpaw from an orthodox stance. (Did he actually set the record for most southpaw world title claimants defeated from the orthodox stance?)

James sure distinguished himself in front of his hometown fans with his dogged refusal to go down when Arguello finally caught up to him, a determination he affirmed in the post fight interview. I also found it interesting he described Alexis as being much like he expected in the ring, with the exception that he found Arguello to be a little quicker than he anticipated. Like his stylistic forerunner Louis, Alexis was awfully effective for a "mechanical" boxer.

Last edited by Duodenum; 11-12-2007 at 04:24 AM.
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Old 11-11-2007, 08:44 PM   #4
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Default Re: Arguello - Busceme

Quote:
Originally Posted by Duodenum
Bubba Busceme fought a very smart fight against Arguello, and I agreed with "Flash" Gordon that the southpaw was pitching a shutout going into the fatal round six.

The judges of course actually had Alexis leading, probably just because of who he was. Otherwise, the only reason I could see for them to be scoring the bout against Busceme was because his aggression might have been rendered ineffective by Arguello's diligent efforts to slip under the multiple jabs Bubba was flicking from his elbow.

Frankly, Busceme boxed Arguello much as I would have tried to do if I was in his shoes. Having finally seen some footage of Winky Wright, it seems to me that a similarity could be drawn between the two of them. Bubba continually rushed Alexis, then tried peppering him with his flicking right, but not expending enough force behind his blows to punch himself out. Busceme's obvious intention was to try stealing a hometown decision over El Flaco Explosivo, rather that try taking him out, or even attempt to hurt him. He'd watched Elizondo try to inflict serious damage on Arguello with his forceful aggression and dedicated body attack, and Alexis busted his jaw and nearly decapitated him fighting off the ropes. Busceme wisely kept the action in ring center (from what I recall anyway).

Unfortunately for James, Arguello knew exactly what he was trying to pull off, and Alex could write the book on how to handle a southpaw from an orthodox stance. (Did he actually set the record for most southpaw world title claimants defeated from the orthodox stance?)

James sure distinguished himself in front of his hometown fans with his dogged refusal to go down when Arguello finally caught up to him, a determination he affirmed in the post fight interview. I also found it interesting he described Alexis as being much like he expected in the ring, with the exception that he found Arguello to be a little quicker than he anticipated. Like his stylistic forerunner Louis, Alexis was awfully effective for a "mechanical" boxer.
That's a fantastic post Duo, truly great reading. Great description of a very low key (nowadays) event that is none the less interesting viewing. I'll give you the chance to make some similar posts in the near future mate, look forward to reading em. When does your deeper periods of boxing viewing kick in so i know what era to concentrate on? I am thinking late 70's maybe.
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Old 11-12-2007, 04:57 AM   #5
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Default Re: Arguello - Busceme

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Originally Posted by JohnThomas1
That's a fantastic post Duo, truly great reading. Great description of a very low key (nowadays) event that is none the less interesting viewing. I'll give you the chance to make some similar posts in the near future mate, look forward to reading em. When does your deeper periods of boxing viewing kick in so i know what era to concentrate on? I am thinking late 70's maybe.
Thanks JT. I tend to wax and wane a bit on my interest in boxing, but like most fair weather fans, my interest was sparked by Ali's recapture of the HW title from Foreman, the popularity of Stallone's first Rocky flick, then the unexpected excitement generated by the 1976 U.S. Olympic Boxing squad. Like many, I followed their progress as professionals.

Later, I saw many rebroadcasts of great fights and noted champions on the Nostalgia Cable network (which are now getting posted on-line), as well as several through the Calvacade of Boxing series syndicated by Steven Bass. (This programme, with color commentary by Harold Lederman, brought heretofore unseen luminaries like Yoko Gushiken and Miguel Canto into American homes.)

I previously made reference to a deceased friend of my father's who had been a top boxer in the U.S. Navy, and then a newspaper man, who provided me loans of classic boxing movies and literature. My brief but intense interest in boxing gradually faded out in the mid 1980s, but obviously one doesn't forget what is already learned. (I've moved completely on from a variety of other formerly intense interests.)

Eventually, my outpouring of commentary into ESB Classic will also subside as I move on to yet other different areas of concentration, but the purging process here is only now just underway. (With a site like this one though, plenty will always come along to add newer and fresher perspectives on familiar topics. I imagine I'll have long since proceeded to other passions before I were to ever reach 5,000 posts. Frankly, I'm startled to have posted over 1,000.)

When I've completely burned out my wavering concentration on these posts, I'll know it's time to fixate on a new, unrelated obsession. It will be very obvious when that happens, as I get consistently sloppy with my facts and posting form.
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Old 11-14-2007, 02:11 AM   #6
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Default Re: Arguello - Busceme

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Originally Posted by Duodenum
Thanks JT. I tend to wax and wane a bit on my interest in boxing, but like most fair weather fans, my interest was sparked by Ali's recapture of the HW title from Foreman, the popularity of Stallone's first Rocky flick, then the unexpected excitement generated by the 1976 U.S. Olympic Boxing squad. Like many, I followed their progress as professionals.

Later, I saw many rebroadcasts of great fights and noted champions on the Nostalgia Cable network (which are now getting posted on-line), as well as several through the Calvacade of Boxing series syndicated by Steven Bass. (This programme, with color commentary by Harold Lederman, brought heretofore unseen luminaries like Yoko Gushiken and Miguel Canto into American homes.)

I previously made reference to a deceased friend of my father's who had been a top boxer in the U.S. Navy, and then a newspaper man, who provided me loans of classic boxing movies and literature. My brief but intense interest in boxing gradually faded out in the mid 1980s, but obviously one doesn't forget what is already learned. (I've moved completely on from a variety of other formerly intense interests.)

Eventually, my outpouring of commentary into ESB Classic will also subside as I move on to yet other different areas of concentration, but the purging process here is only now just underway. (With a site like this one though, plenty will always come along to add newer and fresher perspectives on familiar topics. I imagine I'll have long since proceeded to other passions before I were to ever reach 5,000 posts. Frankly, I'm startled to have posted over 1,000.)

When I've completely burned out my wavering concentration on these posts, I'll know it's time to fixate on a new, unrelated obsession. It will be very obvious when that happens, as I get consistently sloppy with my facts and posting form.
Good stuff!

But do you seriously think we will let you leave at any time in the next 15 years? Think Hotel California, you can check out any time, but.......

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Old 11-15-2007, 04:49 AM   #7
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Default Re: Arguello - Busceme

Ah yes .... El Flaco Explosivo ... My favorite fighter of all time. One of the really exciting things about watching Alexis was the anticipation ... Sometimes he seemed almost like he was just fiddling around, and then all of a sudden he'd get everything figured out they he wanted, step on the gas and close the show. Another really exciting thing about Arguello was that he could change the direction of a fight with a single punch, or the simplest combination.

boo
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Old 11-15-2007, 05:41 PM   #8
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Default Re: Arguello - Busceme

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Originally Posted by booradley
Ah yes .... El Flaco Explosivo ... My favorite fighter of all time. One of the really exciting things about watching Alexis was the anticipation ... Sometimes he seemed almost like he was just fiddling around, and then all of a sudden he'd get everything figured out they he wanted, step on the gas and close the show. Another really exciting thing about Arguello was that he could change the direction of a fight with a single punch, or the simplest combination.

boo
His punch placement was something that simply can't be taught. It's almost as if he was born with an innate understanding of the human anatomy's vital targets. If we were to define the term "sharpshooter" as it relates to boxing, a picture of Arguello would suffice nicely. When looking at the hook he used to knock out Escalera in Rimini, Dr. Eduardo Roman stated that he didn't see power in the punch, but that pinpoint accuracy incapacitated the Snake Man, who fell down three times from the punch. (Years before Tyson did the same to Berbick.)
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