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Old 11-04-2012, 01:15 PM   #1
Dipset
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Default Weight Gaining On A Budget

My brothers...need to put on weight on a low budget....ecto morph...nothing fancy...just a eating plan or what buy in bulk...

Thoughts please brothers.
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Old 11-04-2012, 01:28 PM   #2
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Old 11-04-2012, 01:36 PM   #3
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Default Re: Weight Gaining On A Budget

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dipset View Post
My brothers...need to put on weight on a low budget....ecto morph...nothing fancy...just a eating plan or what buy in bulk...

Thoughts please brothers.
I was the same.

OK.

-Whole milk
-Eggs
-Peanut butter
-Turkey mince
-Beef mince
-wholegrain pasta, bread and rice
-tinned tuna/salmon
-potatoes
-Porridge
-various nuts

Plain whey protein isn't that expensive either

Drink LOTS of milk - babies triple their weight on it in a matter of months. Snack regularly on nuts, peanut butter or fish sandwiches whenever you are hungry. Drink a pint of milk after working out followed by some whey if you can afford it. Eat a good amount of whole grain carbs for lunch and dinner, and eat plenty of cheap mince (turkey has less fat but don't be afraid of fat if you're trying to put on weight. Eat a big bowl of porridge for breakfast with milk and a banana most days. Don't be afraid to have a cheeky cheat meal of mcdonalds or something if you like that sort of thing once a week. Don't forget cheap veg and salad for fibre (though wholegrains help there too).

Hope this helps
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Old 11-04-2012, 01:44 PM   #4
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Default Re: Weight Gaining On A Budget

Quote:
Originally Posted by godlikerich View Post
I was the same.

OK.

-Whole milk
-Eggs
-Peanut butter
-Turkey mince
-Beef mince
-wholegrain pasta, bread and rice
-tinned tuna/salmon
-potatoes
-Porridge
-various nuts

Plain whey protein isn't that expensive either

Drink LOTS of milk - babies triple their weight on it in a matter of months. Snack regularly on nuts, peanut butter or fish sandwiches whenever you are hungry. Drink a pint of milk after working out followed by some whey if you can afford it. Eat a good amount of whole grain carbs for lunch and dinner, and eat plenty of cheap mince (turkey has less fat but don't be afraid of fat if you're trying to put on weight. Eat a big bowl of porridge for breakfast with milk and a banana most days. Don't be afraid to have a cheeky cheat meal of mcdonalds or something if you like that sort of thing once a week. Don't forget cheap veg and salad for fibre (though wholegrains help there too).

Hope this helps
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Old 11-04-2012, 01:45 PM   #5
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Default Re: Weight Gaining On A Budget

Quote:
Originally Posted by godlikerich View Post

Drink LOTS of milk - babies triple their weight on it in a matter of months.

Hope this helps

Especially this bit
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Old 11-04-2012, 01:53 PM   #6
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Default Re: Weight Gaining On A Budget

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Originally Posted by brown bomber View Post
Virus is going to love this
Explain?
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Old 11-04-2012, 01:59 PM   #7
Dipset
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Default Re: Weight Gaining On A Budget

Quote:
Originally Posted by godlikerich View Post
I was the same.

OK.

-Whole milk
-Eggs
-Peanut butter
-Turkey mince
-Beef mince
-wholegrain pasta, bread and rice
-tinned tuna/salmon
-potatoes
-Porridge
-various nuts

Plain whey protein isn't that expensive either

Drink LOTS of milk - babies triple their weight on it in a matter of months. Snack regularly on nuts, peanut butter or fish sandwiches whenever you are hungry. Drink a pint of milk after working out followed by some whey if you can afford it. Eat a good amount of whole grain carbs for lunch and dinner, and eat plenty of cheap mince (turkey has less fat but don't be afraid of fat if you're trying to put on weight. Eat a big bowl of porridge for breakfast with milk and a banana most days. Don't be afraid to have a cheeky cheat meal of mcdonalds or something if you like that sort of thing once a week. Don't forget cheap veg and salad for fibre (though wholegrains help there too).

Hope this helps
Thanks bro.
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Old 11-06-2012, 07:21 PM   #8
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Default Re: Weight Gaining On A Budget

Quote:
Originally Posted by brown bomber View Post
Especially this bit

i thought that's only based on the fact that it's BREAST milk not cow milk
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Old 11-06-2012, 10:29 PM   #9
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Default Re: Weight Gaining On A Budget

Quote:
Originally Posted by godlikerich View Post
I was the same.

OK.

-Whole milk
-Eggs
-Peanut butter
-Turkey mince
-Beef mince
-wholegrain pasta, bread and rice
-tinned tuna/salmon
-potatoes
-Porridge
-various nuts

Plain whey protein isn't that expensive either

Drink LOTS of milk - babies triple their weight on it in a matter of months. Snack regularly on nuts, peanut butter or fish sandwiches whenever you are hungry. Drink a pint of milk after working out followed by some whey if you can afford it. Eat a good amount of whole grain carbs for lunch and dinner, and eat plenty of cheap mince (turkey has less fat but don't be afraid of fat if you're trying to put on weight. Eat a big bowl of porridge for breakfast with milk and a banana most days. Don't be afraid to have a cheeky cheat meal of mcdonalds or something if you like that sort of thing once a week. Don't forget cheap veg and salad for fibre (though wholegrains help there too).

Hope this helps
Oh dear God. Where do i start!!

First things first i assume you want to gain weight as in muscle and healthly?!?

The milk thing is complete rubbish. Breast milk and cow milk are different. You'd actually be better off on low fat milk then full fat & that goes for everyone!!!!

Your right about a cheat meals but that doesn't mean eating that shite in McDonalds. It means like some chocolate, slice of cake not a 1000 calorie meal.

Good sources of Protein:-

Turkey, Peanuts, spinach, chicken, fish, eggs, beans etc...

I haven't even mentioned macros. In summary, you want to eat more calories then your burning off. But do this healthly by avoiding overly processed foods, sugars etc...

Lastly, do you have a smart phone? Download myfitnesspal its free and you will be able to monitor your food intake and give you a fairly accurate guide
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Old 11-07-2012, 04:50 AM   #10
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Default Re: Weight Gaining On A Budget

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48p

Quote:
Typical values Per 100g Per 50g Serving
Energy (kj) 2447 1224
(kcal) 590 295
Protein 27.5g 13.8g
Carbohydrate 9.9g 5.0g
of which Sugars 5.3g 2.7g
Fat 49.0g 24.5g
of which Saturates 8.8g 4.4g
Fibre 9.0g 4.5g
Sodium* 0.5g 0.3g
*equivalent as Salt 1.3g 0.7g
Niacin 16.2mg 8.1mg
90% RDA 45% RDA
Biotin 0.1mg 0.05mg
67% RDA 33% RDA
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Old 11-07-2012, 06:59 AM   #11
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Default Re: Weight Gaining On A Budget

Something I've found useful: [Only registered and activated users can see links. ]

Basically you need to eat more than maintenance. Figure that out by using the estimates in the first paragraph. Or you can calculate your BMR by using one of the methods below (or an online BMR calculator), then multiply by your appropriate activity factor, and that also gives you an estimate of your maintenance calories. Figure out your macro needs and eat more calories than you need to maintain. Monitor and adjust accordingly. That should give a better idea of what you need and the foods you can buy to fit your budget and meet your goals.


Quote:
Estimating Requirements
The simplest method is to base your intake on a standard 'calories per unit of weight (usually kilograms)'. Typically:
- 26 to 30 kcals/kg/day for normal, healthy individuals with sedentary lifestyles doing little physical activity [12.0-14 kcal/pound]
- 31 to 37 kcal/kg/day for those involved in light to moderate activity 3-5 x a week with moderately active lifestyles [14-16 kcal/ pound]
- 38 to 40 kcals/kg/day for those involved in vigorous activity and highly active jobs [16-18 kcal/ pound].
For those involved in HEAVY training (eg: athletes) - the demand is greater:
- 41 to 50 kcals/kg/day for those involved in moderate to heavy training (for example: 15-20 hrs/ week training) [18.5-22 kcal/ pound]
- 50 or above kcals/kg/day for those involved in heavy to extreme training [> 22 kcal/ pound]

There are then a number of other formula which calculate BMR. This means it calculates what you need should you be in a coma.
1/ Harris-Benedict formula: Very inaccurate. It was derived from studies on LEAN, YOUNG, ACTIVE males MANY YEARS AGO (1919). Notorious for OVERESTIMATING requirements, especially in the overweight. IF YOU CAN AVOID IT, DON'T USE IT!
MEN: BMR = 66 + [13.7 x weight (kg)] + [5 x height (cm)] - [6.76 x age (years)]
WOMEN: BMR = 655 + [9.6 x weight (kg)] + [1.8 x height (cm)] - [4.7 x age (years)]

2/Mifflin-St Jeor: Developed in the 1990s and more realistic in todays settings. It still doesn't take into consideration the differences as a consequence of high BF%. Thus, once again, it OVERESTIMATES NEEDS, ESPECIALLY IN THE OVERWEIGHT.
MEN: BMR = [9.99 x weight (kg)] + [6.25 x height (cm)] - [4.92 x age (years)] + 5
WOMEN: BMR = [9.99 x weight (kg)] + [6.25 x height (cm)] - [4.92 x age (years)] -161

3/Katch-McArdle:Considered the most accurate formula for those who are relatively lean. Use ONLY if you have a good estimate of your bodyfat %.
BMR = 370 + (21.6 x LBM)Where LBM = [total weight (kg) x (100 - bodyfat %)]/100

As these are only BMR calculations To convert BMR to a TOTAL requirement you need to multiply the result of your BMR by an 'activity variable' to give TEE.
The Activity Factor is the TOTAL cost of living, NOT JUST YOUR TRAINING. Think about it - if you train 1 hr a day - WHAT ARE YOU DOING THE OTHER 23 HRS?! So MORE important than training -- it includes work, life activities, training/sport & the TEF of ~15% (an average mixed diet).
Average activity variables are:
1.2 = Sedentary (Desk job, and Little Formal Exercise)
1.3-1.4 = Lightly Active (Light daily activity AND light exercise 1-3 days a week)
1.5-1.6 = Moderately Active (Moderately daily Activity & Moderate exercise 3-5 days a week)
1.7-1.8 = Very Active (Physically demanding lifestyle & Hard exercise 6-7 days a week)
1.9-2.2 = Extremely Active (Athlete in ENDURANCE training or VERY HARD physical job)

How Accurate are they?: They give rough ball-park figures and are still 'guesstimations'. So the aim is to use these as 'rough figures', monitor your weight/ measurements for 2-4 weeks, & IF your weight is stable/ measurements are stable, you have likely found maintenance.

Using the Above to Recalculate Based on Goals
You then need to DECREASE or INCREASE intake based on your goals (eg: lose or gain mass). It is not recommended to use a 'generic calorie amounts' (eg: 500 cals/ day). Instead this should be calculated on a % of your maintenance. Why? The effect of different calorie amounts is going to be markedly different based on someones size/ total calorie intake. For example - subtracting 500 cals/ day from a 1500 total intake is 1/3rd of the total cals, where 500 cals/ day from 3000 total intake is only 1/6th of the total. The results will therefore be markedly different on an individuals energy level & weight loss. Generally:
- To ADD weight: ADD 10-20% calories to the total above
- To LOSE weight: SUBTRACT 10-20% calories from the total above
Then monitor your results and adjust as required.

Macronutrient Needs
Once you work out calorie needs, you then work out how much of each macronutrient you should aim for. This is one of the areas that is MOST often confused but This should NOT be based on a RATIO of macro intakes. (eg: '30:40:30 or 40:40:20') Your body doesn't CARE what % intake you have. It works based on SUFFICIENT QUANTITY per MASS.

So to try to make it as simple as possible:
1. Protein: Protein intake is a bit of a controversial issue in nutrition. The general recommendations given in the 'bodybuilding' area are nearly double the 'standard' recommendations given in the Sports Nutrition Arena.
The GENERAL sports nutrition guideline based on clinical trials suggest that in the face of ADEQUATE calories and CARBS the following protein intakes are sufficient:
STRENGTH training -> 1.4 to 2g per KG bodyweight (about .6 / pound)
ENDURANCE training -> 1.2 to 1.8g per KG bodyweight (about .8 / pound)
ADOLESCENT in training -> 1.8 to 2.2g per KG bodyweight (about 1g / pound)
BUT researchers also acknowledge that protein becomes MORE important in the context of LOWER calorie intakes, or LOWER carb intakes.
Recent evidence also suggests that protein intakes of 3g/kg help with physiological and psychological stressors associated with high volume or intense training.
One should also note that ADEQUATE v's OPTIMAL is not discussed when it comes to hypertrophy v's performance.
And lastly - you need to consider thermogenics/ satiety/ and personal preference.

So - General 'bodybuilding' guidelines for protein would be as follows:
- Moderate bodyfat and training load = 2.2-2.8g per kg TOTAL weight (about 1-1.25g per pound)
- Very Low bodyfat or Very Low Calorie or High training load = 2.4 - 3g per kg TOTAL weight (1.1-1.35g per pound)
- High bodyfat, high calorie, or low training load = 1.6 to 2.2g per kg TOTAL weight (.75 - 1g per pound)
Anecdotally, as most find HIGHER protein intake better for satiety, partitioning, blood sugar control, and hypertrophy. UNLESS you have medical reasons for lower protein, or unless guided to use the GENERAL sports nutrition guidelines, I would suggest the BODYBUILDING values.


2. Fats: Generally speaking, although the body can get away with short periods of very low fat, in the long run your body NEEDS fat to maintain health, satiety, and sanity. Additionally - any form of high intensity training will benefit from a 'fat buffer' in your diet - which controls free radical damage & inflammation. General guides:
Average or low bodyfat: 1 - 2g fat/ kg body weight [between 0.40 - 1g total weight/ pounds]
High bodyfat: 1-2g fat/ Kg LEAN weight [between 0.4 - 1g LEAN weight/ pounds]
Low calorie dieting - you can decrease further, but as a minimum, I would not suggest LESS than about 0.30g/ pound.
Note 1: Total fat intake is NOT the same as 'essential fats' (essential fats are specific TYPES of fats that are INCLUDED in your total fat intake)...


3. Carbs: For carbs there are no specific 'requirements' for your body so - but carbs are important for athletes, ACTIVE individuals, or those trying to GAIN MASS. [carbs help with workout intensity, health, & satiety (+ sanity)]. This means if you are an athlete involved in a good volume of training I would suggest you CALCULATE a requirement for carbs as a PRIORITY - then go back and calculate protein / fat:
Moderately active: 4.5 - 6.5 g/ kg (about 2 - 3g/ pound)
High active: 6.5 - 8.5 g/ kg (about 3 - 4g/ pound)
INTENSE activity: + 8.5g / kg (more than 4g/ pound)

For 'others' - simply carbohydrate intakes via the calories left over from fats/ protein:
carb cals = Total cal needs - ([protein grams above x 4] + [fat grams above x 9])
carb grams = (above cals)/ 4
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Old 11-07-2012, 11:10 AM   #12
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Old 11-07-2012, 11:20 AM   #13
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Default Re: Weight Gaining On A Budget

Work your macros out, people are too obsessed with 'eating healthy' I was as well but you could have a burger king everyday and still gain lean mass if you work it around your macros.

Where's jdsm? Loves these threads.
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Old 11-07-2012, 03:08 PM   #14
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Default Re: Weight Gaining On A Budget

Post by Brand NOOBian is a great starting point.

Comprise your diet of foods that fit into your overall macro targets, whilst getting plenty of micronutrients in. I encourage people to vary their intake from day to day to ensure you 'cover all bases' so to speak.
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