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Old 01-11-2014, 05:45 PM   #541
dempsey1234
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Default Re: I am a boxing manager: if you have questions about the boxing biz, ask!

Guys found this article and thought you might like it, the trials and tribulations of turning pro:
Turning Pro
By Enrique Encinosa

miami.jpg (11805 bytes)
The boxing ring was assembled in the parking lot of a muffler shop. The temporary wood stands were filled with a capacity crowd since early morning. The area surrounding the ring was crowded with people, a few carrying umbrellas to protect them from the bright Florida sun, while others drank beers from paper cups. Up and down Calle Ocho over a half million people moved freely.

The yearly street festival in Little Havana was a picturesque sight on that warm March morning in 1984. Besides the free pro boxing card and martial arts exhibitions, street vendors peddled t-shirts, souvenirs and balloons. Temporary stages were set up for street performances by the best musicians from the tropics. Salsa music and Spanish rock sounds filled the air, the sound of electric guitars and steel instruments mixing with the thumping of conga drums. Dance ensembles in elaborate costumes performed for the crowds. Plates of roast pork with black beans and rice were sold from wooden booths, along with a variety of sandwiches, pastries, fruit juices, soft drinks and beer.

I was busy on that orange bright afternoon. One of my fighters was turning pro. The makeshift dressing room was a rented room in a tiny, worn-down hotel across the street from the muffler shop where the ring had been set-up. Dave Clark, one of the nicest people in boxing, was taping my fighter's hand. The fighter, a light heavyweight with a facial resemblance to Joe Frazier, was relaxed. Dave on the other hand, seemed slightly nervous. The boxing trainer had a father-son relationship with the young fighter, whom he had schooled since the youth had been a thin flyweight in Florida Junior Olympic tournaments.

"Don't worry," I said to Dave, pulling him aside, "this will be an easy fight. The next ones will be tougher, but this one is cake. Tell Little Joe to maneuver in the ring keeping the sun on his opponent's face. That will help."

Dave nodded. He had been working with the kid daily for five or six years. After ninety amateur bouts, the young teenager was entering the pro ranks while still in high school.

A Florida Deputy Boxing Commissioner wearing a wrinkled suit entered the dressing room, his forehead beading with perspiration from the afternoon sunshine. The man's face was creased by a scowl.

"Are you the manager of Robert Daniels?" he asked.

"Yes," I answered, "Is anything wrong?"

"Let's step outside. I need to talk to you."

The commissioner was upset.

"I thought you were an up front kind of guy," he told me, "but I guess I was wrong."

It was my turn to scowl.

"What the hell are you talking about?"

"This kid is seventeen and never had a pro fight. His opponent is twenty-six and has been fighting pro for six years. I'm going to cancel this bout."

I could not believe my ears. The commissioner was concerned about an overmatch while I was personally embarrassed because I believed the fight to be too easy, even for a pro debut. I had tried to procure a tougher opponent, but the few prelim light heavyweights in South Florida were unavailable, some healing, others not interested in fighting a young fighter for four round money, while a couple of others were away on vacations provided by the Florida Department of Corrections.

"Are you serious?" I asked, "James Roper has had eleven fights with only one win. He has been stopped seven times. Daniels was one of the best amateurs in Florida. This is an easy fight for my fighter."

"He's a minor."

"I have a notarized letter from his mother allowing him to turn pro."

"Not good enough."

"How about if I sign a letter assuming all responsibility for any injuries that might happen to him in this fight?"

The deputy commissioner nodded slowly.

"Okay," I insisted, "Get the paperwork ready. I'll sign."

As the deputy commissioner walked away, I shook my head in disbelief. A couple of minutes later, Frankie Otero, the former lightweight contender, working as the matchmaker for the eight bout card of four and six rounders, walked towards me, shaking his head.

"I can't believe that guy," he told me, "when he came bitching about that fight, I thought he would consider it a mismatch for Roper, not Little Joe. I explained it's not an even match."

"It isn't. It's an easy win for Little Joe. Can you open the card with this fight? I don't want this idiot to change his mind."

"Sure. As soon as you sign that paper get him up on the ring."

I walked back to the dressing room. Little Joe looked relaxed.

"Warm him up, Dave," I said, "He's going to be the first bout."

The deputy commissioner returned with a hand-written paper. I signed it with a smile, not wanting to provide any excuse that would interfere with the bout.

The next few minutes I wandered around ringside, talking to friends, sipping a soda, hoping that the political bureaucrats would not interfere once again. As Frankie signaled for the show to begin I felt relieved. Once up on the ring, I reasoned, the fight would not be scratched.

I went up on the ring. The deputy commissioner was seated at ringside, his face inches away from the ring apron, looking mildly disgusted in his wrinkled suit. I smiled once again, walked over towards the ring ropes, standing directly above the deputy commissioner. The paper I had signed was neatly folded on his breast pocket. Roper, dressed in green trunks and a faded robe entered the ring. I motioned for Little Joe to come to where I stood.

"How you feeling, Joe?" I asked.

"Fine." Robert was not a big talker.

"I want you to do me a special favor," I said, loud enough so the man at the ring apron would hear me, "I want you to drop this guy cold in the first round. I want you to drop him right here, in this spot where I am standing. Not anywhere else. Right here. You understand."

Daniels nodded. He didn't know the details of the situation but at seventeen, he had street smarts, earned in a tough northwest Miami neighborhood. The deputy commissioner looked like he was ready to jump in the ring, but the announcer, holding a battery operated microphone, was in the process of introducing Roper.

The fight lasted less than a minute. Roper danced, jabbing twice with his left. Little Joe shuffled in, hands held high, wine red gloves shielding his face. Roper moved to the side as Daniels pawed a lazy jab, cutting the ring, moving his opponent towards the spot where the commissioner sat. Roper jabbed twice more, threw a right that grazed Little Joe, eating a jab in return. As Roper's back touched the ropes, Little Joe shifted his weight, unloading a short hook that landed crisply on his
opponent's chin. James Roper dropped to the canvas, his glassy eyes staring at the deputy commissioner.

The referee raised Daniel's arm in victory. I toweled off my fighter while I looked down at the ring apron. The deputy commissioner was shaking his head in disbelief. I winked at him and smiled again. He did not smile back.

"You did good," I said to Little Joe, "you are on your way now."

I was right. Robert Daniels, who turned pro at seventeen in a Miami street festival, went on to become the first Florida born boxing champion.
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Old 01-11-2014, 07:23 PM   #542
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Default Re: I am a boxing manager: if you have questions about the boxing biz, ask!

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Originally Posted by dempsey1234 View Post
Guys found this article and thought you might like it, the trials and tribulations of turning pro:
Turning Pro
By Enrique Encinosa

miami.jpg (11805 bytes)
The boxing ring was assembled in the parking lot of a muffler shop. The temporary wood stands were filled with a capacity crowd since early morning. The area surrounding the ring was crowded with people, a few carrying umbrellas to protect them from the bright Florida sun, while others drank beers from paper cups. Up and down Calle Ocho over a half million people moved freely.

The yearly street festival in Little Havana was a picturesque sight on that warm March morning in 1984. Besides the free pro boxing card and martial arts exhibitions, street vendors peddled t-shirts, souvenirs and balloons. Temporary stages were set up for street performances by the best musicians from the tropics. Salsa music and Spanish rock sounds filled the air, the sound of electric guitars and steel instruments mixing with the thumping of conga drums. Dance ensembles in elaborate costumes performed for the crowds. Plates of roast pork with black beans and rice were sold from wooden booths, along with a variety of sandwiches, pastries, fruit juices, soft drinks and beer.

I was busy on that orange bright afternoon. One of my fighters was turning pro. The makeshift dressing room was a rented room in a tiny, worn-down hotel across the street from the muffler shop where the ring had been set-up. Dave Clark, one of the nicest people in boxing, was taping my fighter's hand. The fighter, a light heavyweight with a facial resemblance to Joe Frazier, was relaxed. Dave on the other hand, seemed slightly nervous. The boxing trainer had a father-son relationship with the young fighter, whom he had schooled since the youth had been a thin flyweight in Florida Junior Olympic tournaments.

"Don't worry," I said to Dave, pulling him aside, "this will be an easy fight. The next ones will be tougher, but this one is cake. Tell Little Joe to maneuver in the ring keeping the sun on his opponent's face. That will help."

Dave nodded. He had been working with the kid daily for five or six years. After ninety amateur bouts, the young teenager was entering the pro ranks while still in high school.

A Florida Deputy Boxing Commissioner wearing a wrinkled suit entered the dressing room, his forehead beading with perspiration from the afternoon sunshine. The man's face was creased by a scowl.

"Are you the manager of Robert Daniels?" he asked.

"Yes," I answered, "Is anything wrong?"

"Let's step outside. I need to talk to you."

The commissioner was upset.

"I thought you were an up front kind of guy," he told me, "but I guess I was wrong."

It was my turn to scowl.

"What the hell are you talking about?"

"This kid is seventeen and never had a pro fight. His opponent is twenty-six and has been fighting pro for six years. I'm going to cancel this bout."

I could not believe my ears. The commissioner was concerned about an overmatch while I was personally embarrassed because I believed the fight to be too easy, even for a pro debut. I had tried to procure a tougher opponent, but the few prelim light heavyweights in South Florida were unavailable, some healing, others not interested in fighting a young fighter for four round money, while a couple of others were away on vacations provided by the Florida Department of Corrections.

"Are you serious?" I asked, "James Roper has had eleven fights with only one win. He has been stopped seven times. Daniels was one of the best amateurs in Florida. This is an easy fight for my fighter."

"He's a minor."

"I have a notarized letter from his mother allowing him to turn pro."

"Not good enough."

"How about if I sign a letter assuming all responsibility for any injuries that might happen to him in this fight?"

The deputy commissioner nodded slowly.

"Okay," I insisted, "Get the paperwork ready. I'll sign."

As the deputy commissioner walked away, I shook my head in disbelief. A couple of minutes later, Frankie Otero, the former lightweight contender, working as the matchmaker for the eight bout card of four and six rounders, walked towards me, shaking his head.

"I can't believe that guy," he told me, "when he came bitching about that fight, I thought he would consider it a mismatch for Roper, not Little Joe. I explained it's not an even match."

"It isn't. It's an easy win for Little Joe. Can you open the card with this fight? I don't want this idiot to change his mind."

"Sure. As soon as you sign that paper get him up on the ring."

I walked back to the dressing room. Little Joe looked relaxed.

"Warm him up, Dave," I said, "He's going to be the first bout."

The deputy commissioner returned with a hand-written paper. I signed it with a smile, not wanting to provide any excuse that would interfere with the bout.

The next few minutes I wandered around ringside, talking to friends, sipping a soda, hoping that the political bureaucrats would not interfere once again. As Frankie signaled for the show to begin I felt relieved. Once up on the ring, I reasoned, the fight would not be scratched.

I went up on the ring. The deputy commissioner was seated at ringside, his face inches away from the ring apron, looking mildly disgusted in his wrinkled suit. I smiled once again, walked over towards the ring ropes, standing directly above the deputy commissioner. The paper I had signed was neatly folded on his breast pocket. Roper, dressed in green trunks and a faded robe entered the ring. I motioned for Little Joe to come to where I stood.

"How you feeling, Joe?" I asked.

"Fine." Robert was not a big talker.

"I want you to do me a special favor," I said, loud enough so the man at the ring apron would hear me, "I want you to drop this guy cold in the first round. I want you to drop him right here, in this spot where I am standing. Not anywhere else. Right here. You understand."

Daniels nodded. He didn't know the details of the situation but at seventeen, he had street smarts, earned in a tough northwest Miami neighborhood. The deputy commissioner looked like he was ready to jump in the ring, but the announcer, holding a battery operated microphone, was in the process of introducing Roper.

The fight lasted less than a minute. Roper danced, jabbing twice with his left. Little Joe shuffled in, hands held high, wine red gloves shielding his face. Roper moved to the side as Daniels pawed a lazy jab, cutting the ring, moving his opponent towards the spot where the commissioner sat. Roper jabbed twice more, threw a right that grazed Little Joe, eating a jab in return. As Roper's back touched the ropes, Little Joe shifted his weight, unloading a short hook that landed crisply on his
opponent's chin. James Roper dropped to the canvas, his glassy eyes staring at the deputy commissioner.

The referee raised Daniel's arm in victory. I toweled off my fighter while I looked down at the ring apron. The deputy commissioner was shaking his head in disbelief. I winked at him and smiled again. He did not smile back.

"You did good," I said to Little Joe, "you are on your way now."

I was right. Robert Daniels, who turned pro at seventeen in a Miami street festival, went on to become the first Florida born boxing champion.
Great story,cheers for the reply to my post also
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Old 01-12-2014, 05:45 PM   #543
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Hello I have a website I started that focuses on sparring partners, from a managers prospective would this be a useful tool for your fighter? VanSparr Sparring
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Old 01-12-2014, 09:55 PM   #544
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Stop posting ur gay sparring website that ppl have to pay for on here
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Old 01-13-2014, 02:23 PM   #545
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VS no manager who knows his stuff will pay for a sparring service if that is what your sparring site does. I still do it the old fashioned way, I pick up the phone and call around.
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Old 01-13-2014, 04:54 PM   #546
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Default Re: I am a boxing manager: if you have questions about the boxing biz, ask!

Quote:
Originally Posted by dempsey1234 View Post
Guys found this article and thought you might like it, the trials and tribulations of turning pro:
Turning Pro
By Enrique Encinosa

miami.jpg (11805 bytes)
The boxing ring was assembled in the parking lot of a muffler shop. The temporary wood stands were filled with a capacity crowd since early morning. The area surrounding the ring was crowded with people, a few carrying umbrellas to protect them from the bright Florida sun, while others drank beers from paper cups. Up and down Calle Ocho over a half million people moved freely.

The yearly street festival in Little Havana was a picturesque sight on that warm March morning in 1984. Besides the free pro boxing card and martial arts exhibitions, street vendors peddled t-shirts, souvenirs and balloons. Temporary stages were set up for street performances by the best musicians from the tropics. Salsa music and Spanish rock sounds filled the air, the sound of electric guitars and steel instruments mixing with the thumping of conga drums. Dance ensembles in elaborate costumes performed for the crowds. Plates of roast pork with black beans and rice were sold from wooden booths, along with a variety of sandwiches, pastries, fruit juices, soft drinks and beer.

I was busy on that orange bright afternoon. One of my fighters was turning pro. The makeshift dressing room was a rented room in a tiny, worn-down hotel across the street from the muffler shop where the ring had been set-up. Dave Clark, one of the nicest people in boxing, was taping my fighter's hand. The fighter, a light heavyweight with a facial resemblance to Joe Frazier, was relaxed. Dave on the other hand, seemed slightly nervous. The boxing trainer had a father-son relationship with the young fighter, whom he had schooled since the youth had been a thin flyweight in Florida Junior Olympic tournaments.

"Don't worry," I said to Dave, pulling him aside, "this will be an easy fight. The next ones will be tougher, but this one is cake. Tell Little Joe to maneuver in the ring keeping the sun on his opponent's face. That will help."

Dave nodded. He had been working with the kid daily for five or six years. After ninety amateur bouts, the young teenager was entering the pro ranks while still in high school.

A Florida Deputy Boxing Commissioner wearing a wrinkled suit entered the dressing room, his forehead beading with perspiration from the afternoon sunshine. The man's face was creased by a scowl.

"Are you the manager of Robert Daniels?" he asked.

"Yes," I answered, "Is anything wrong?"

"Let's step outside. I need to talk to you."

The commissioner was upset.

"I thought you were an up front kind of guy," he told me, "but I guess I was wrong."

It was my turn to scowl.

"What the hell are you talking about?"

"This kid is seventeen and never had a pro fight. His opponent is twenty-six and has been fighting pro for six years. I'm going to cancel this bout."

I could not believe my ears. The commissioner was concerned about an overmatch while I was personally embarrassed because I believed the fight to be too easy, even for a pro debut. I had tried to procure a tougher opponent, but the few prelim light heavyweights in South Florida were unavailable, some healing, others not interested in fighting a young fighter for four round money, while a couple of others were away on vacations provided by the Florida Department of Corrections.

"Are you serious?" I asked, "James Roper has had eleven fights with only one win. He has been stopped seven times. Daniels was one of the best amateurs in Florida. This is an easy fight for my fighter."

"He's a minor."

"I have a notarized letter from his mother allowing him to turn pro."

"Not good enough."

"How about if I sign a letter assuming all responsibility for any injuries that might happen to him in this fight?"

The deputy commissioner nodded slowly.

"Okay," I insisted, "Get the paperwork ready. I'll sign."

As the deputy commissioner walked away, I shook my head in disbelief. A couple of minutes later, Frankie Otero, the former lightweight contender, working as the matchmaker for the eight bout card of four and six rounders, walked towards me, shaking his head.

"I can't believe that guy," he told me, "when he came bitching about that fight, I thought he would consider it a mismatch for Roper, not Little Joe. I explained it's not an even match."

"It isn't. It's an easy win for Little Joe. Can you open the card with this fight? I don't want this idiot to change his mind."

"Sure. As soon as you sign that paper get him up on the ring."

I walked back to the dressing room. Little Joe looked relaxed.

"Warm him up, Dave," I said, "He's going to be the first bout."

The deputy commissioner returned with a hand-written paper. I signed it with a smile, not wanting to provide any excuse that would interfere with the bout.

The next few minutes I wandered around ringside, talking to friends, sipping a soda, hoping that the political bureaucrats would not interfere once again. As Frankie signaled for the show to begin I felt relieved. Once up on the ring, I reasoned, the fight would not be scratched.

I went up on the ring. The deputy commissioner was seated at ringside, his face inches away from the ring apron, looking mildly disgusted in his wrinkled suit. I smiled once again, walked over towards the ring ropes, standing directly above the deputy commissioner. The paper I had signed was neatly folded on his breast pocket. Roper, dressed in green trunks and a faded robe entered the ring. I motioned for Little Joe to come to where I stood.

"How you feeling, Joe?" I asked.

"Fine." Robert was not a big talker.

"I want you to do me a special favor," I said, loud enough so the man at the ring apron would hear me, "I want you to drop this guy cold in the first round. I want you to drop him right here, in this spot where I am standing. Not anywhere else. Right here. You understand."

Daniels nodded. He didn't know the details of the situation but at seventeen, he had street smarts, earned in a tough northwest Miami neighborhood. The deputy commissioner looked like he was ready to jump in the ring, but the announcer, holding a battery operated microphone, was in the process of introducing Roper.

The fight lasted less than a minute. Roper danced, jabbing twice with his left. Little Joe shuffled in, hands held high, wine red gloves shielding his face. Roper moved to the side as Daniels pawed a lazy jab, cutting the ring, moving his opponent towards the spot where the commissioner sat. Roper jabbed twice more, threw a right that grazed Little Joe, eating a jab in return. As Roper's back touched the ropes, Little Joe shifted his weight, unloading a short hook that landed crisply on his
opponent's chin. James Roper dropped to the canvas, his glassy eyes staring at the deputy commissioner.

The referee raised Daniel's arm in victory. I toweled off my fighter while I looked down at the ring apron. The deputy commissioner was shaking his head in disbelief. I winked at him and smiled again. He did not smile back.

"You did good," I said to Little Joe, "you are on your way now."

I was right. Robert Daniels, who turned pro at seventeen in a Miami street festival, went on to become the first Florida born boxing champion.
Great read Dempsey! Question, should I try to make connections with matchmakers right now while I have no fighter or wait until I sign one first?
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Old 01-13-2014, 07:07 PM   #547
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Great read Dempsey! Question, should I try to make connections with matchmakers right now while I have no fighter or wait until I sign one first?
Nah, start developing a relationship ASAP, in boxing it's who you and most importantly who knows you. Be straight with them ask them for advice, talk about fights and fighters talk boxing, get to know each other, it's the best way.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:08 PM   #548
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Default Re: I am a boxing manager: if you have questions about the boxing biz, ask!

This is a great thread props to Dempsey & MakeWeight for answering questions & giving detailed insight into the boxing world.

I have a question myself I could be getting into the boxing world as a manager, my close friend is currently amateur & is looking at turning pro this year & he wants me involved. Once he turns pro what roles do you think need to be filled straight away (e.g. Lawyer, advisor S & C Coach etc
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Old 01-17-2014, 12:22 AM   #549
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This is a great thread props to Dempsey & MakeWeight for answering questions & giving detailed insight into the boxing world.

I have a question myself I could be getting into the boxing world as a manager, my close friend is currently amateur & is looking at turning pro this year & he wants me involved. Once he turns pro what roles do you think need to be filled straight away (e.g. Lawyer, advisor S & C Coach etc
Unless you have deep pockets or this fighter has some serious sponsors, S and C coach, lawyer etc are going to be a step far straight away. A solid honest trainer and you making the right connections to guide him are the things he will need straight away, before you have to worry about any of that.
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Old 01-17-2014, 01:31 PM   #550
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This is a great thread props to Dempsey & MakeWeight for answering questions & giving detailed insight into the boxing world.

I have a question myself I could be getting into the boxing world as a manager, my close friend is currently amateur & is looking at turning pro this year & he wants me involved. Once he turns pro what roles do you think need to be filled straight away (e.g. Lawyer, advisor S & C Coach etc
TB learn as much as you can about the lay of the land in your area. I don't know about your friend but if he doesn't have a "name", in other words that he is a well known amateur who has a reputation, it will be hard to get a promoter interested enough to sign him. Let's say he is a "name" in the amateur circles, finding opponents who would be willing to fight him is at times frustrating and difficult. That is why you need a promoter willing to spend the money to bring you along "right".
If your guy has fought in the local amateur area he will be known enough for the local matchmaker to put him into a category; makes good fights, a puncher, an opponent, ticket-seller with a following. a boring stinkin' guy, a southpaw, has potential. The matchmaker will decide where you fit in the scheme of things. You the Manager has to convince the matchmaker or promoter, that your guy deserves a shot on a card. As the manager you have to figure where you fit in not based on the managers POV but how the locals view your fighter. If he fought amateur there is already a line on him. It's the managers job to get a line on the opponent and decide the guys future, will he be an opponent or worthie
of better things and of signing. Sometimes the promoter is looking to put on good fights and not protecting anybody. Then it's survival of the fittest, you the manager has to weigh the risks vs the rewards. Check the area promoters and matchmakers if they are experienced and been around awhile don't try to BS them, they've heard it all. Don't become a pest, read him as he is reading you. Remember he needs you but not as much as you need him.
First thing is make sure the fighter has a trainer who can get him ready for the fight. As you are building a team, Coach, asst. coach, cutman, S&C guy. Usually a S&C guy is brought in for a specific reason, such as problems making weight, stamina problems, they come in if there is a problem. You the manager has to decide if the expense is warranted. An attorney is only needed to read contracts and tell you what you should or shouldn't agree to. Good luck
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Old 01-17-2014, 01:48 PM   #551
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Unless you have deep pockets or this fighter has some serious sponsors, S and C coach, lawyer etc are going to be a step far straight away. A solid honest trainer and you making the right connections to guide him are the things he will need straight away, before you have to worry about any of that.
SG, You are so right it takes money to build a fighter, something people don't realize until it's too late.
I have such a problem one of my guys has to travel to get proper training and sparring, which means hotel or an apartment, food, transportation. That figures out to approximately $2000 per camp, not counting equipment cost.
Take one step at a time adding or replacing as you move along.
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Old 01-17-2014, 05:57 PM   #552
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Unless you have deep pockets or this fighter has some serious sponsors, S and C coach, lawyer etc are going to be a step far straight away. A solid honest trainer and you making the right connections to guide him are the things he will need straight away, before you have to worry about any of that.
The trainer he is currently with is a very good trainer, knows his stuff & they work well together. Thanks for your response
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Old 01-17-2014, 05:58 PM   #553
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TB learn as much as you can about the lay of the land in your area. I don't know about your friend but if he doesn't have a "name", in other words that he is a well known amateur who has a reputation, it will be hard to get a promoter interested enough to sign him. Let's say he is a "name" in the amateur circles, finding opponents who would be willing to fight him is at times frustrating and difficult. That is why you need a promoter willing to spend the money to bring you along "right".
If your guy has fought in the local amateur area he will be known enough for the local matchmaker to put him into a category; makes good fights, a puncher, an opponent, ticket-seller with a following. a boring stinkin' guy, a southpaw, has potential. The matchmaker will decide where you fit in the scheme of things. You the Manager has to convince the matchmaker or promoter, that your guy deserves a shot on a card. As the manager you have to figure where you fit in not based on the managers POV but how the locals view your fighter. If he fought amateur there is already a line on him. It's the managers job to get a line on the opponent and decide the guys future, will he be an opponent or worthie
of better things and of signing. Sometimes the promoter is looking to put on good fights and not protecting anybody. Then it's survival of the fittest, you the manager has to weigh the risks vs the rewards. Check the area promoters and matchmakers if they are experienced and been around awhile don't try to BS them, they've heard it all. Don't become a pest, read him as he is reading you. Remember he needs you but not as much as you need him.
First thing is make sure the fighter has a trainer who can get him ready for the fight. As you are building a team, Coach, asst. coach, cutman, S&C guy. Usually a S&C guy is brought in for a specific reason, such as problems making weight, stamina problems, they come in if there is a problem. You the manager has to decide if the expense is warranted. An attorney is only needed to read contracts and tell you what you should or shouldn't agree to. Good luck

He is looking to create more of a name for himself within the amateurs so I'll take that on board aswell as everything else (negotiating, checking out promoters in the area etc) he's very dedicated in terms of conditioning & staying in shape & that seems to be a common theme in the thread is making sure you have an attorney look at any contract given.

I'm a completely new to the boxing & have no previous experience so thanks much appreciated.

Last edited by The Boss; 01-17-2014 at 06:10 PM.
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Old 01-19-2014, 09:06 PM   #554
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He is looking to create more of a name for himself within the amateurs so I'll take that on board aswell as everything else (negotiating, checking out promoters in the area etc) he's very dedicated in terms of conditioning & staying in shape & that seems to be a common theme in the thread is making sure you have an attorney look at any contract given.

I'm a completely new to the boxing & have no previous experience so thanks much appreciated.
Good Luck if I can help let me know. One thing don't oversell the fighter as most guys will might come back and bite you in the butt.
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Old 01-20-2014, 06:14 PM   #555
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Good Luck if I can help let me know. One thing don't oversell the fighter as most guys will might come back and bite you in the butt.

I will most definitely be asking for your advice when he does turn professional, so thanks again.
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