A Fairly Thorough Explanation As To Why Ruiz's KO Victory Over AJ Was In Fact NOT A Fluke.

Discussion in 'World Boxing Forum' started by CST80, Sep 5, 2019.


  1. CST80

    CST80 The Mercurial Mephistophelean Malcontent Staff Member

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    Don't let yourself get fooled, while I'm not a huge fan of AJ, there's a reason why Anthony Joshua beat Wladimir Klitschko, Alexander Povetkin, Dillian Whyte, Carlos Takam and Joseph Parker. It's because Joshua's power is very real and works as a wickedly powerful deterrent and ultimately an exclamation point against most fighters with weak chins and safety first fighters that don't like taking risks, hell even guys with amazing chins can't be ruled out, he was even able to drop Ruiz after all. Is it Wilder level power? Maybe not, but it's not too far off. Add to that, AJ has a solid command of the fundamentals, decent reflexes, fast hands, is a good combination puncher, decent footwork, and yes good timing. So when you add the power as the ultimate deterrent, that quickly turns what appears to be only a moderately skilled boxer into a fearful beast of a fighter to most fans, so beastly in fact, most of his opponents are terrified of sharing the ring with him. Except for Ruiz, because Ruiz knew that he had his number going in. Hence the aw shucks I can't believed I'm being given this shot mixed with low level Cheshire Cat grin from ear to ear on his face before the fight. Why and how AJ falters against a guy like Ruiz is because he possesses a few qualities that are in every way, shape and form.... AJ's kryptonite. Let me lay them out for you....

    While Ruiz has a solid high guard defense, it's what he does with that high guard defense that matters. It's not just a high guard, it's a very active, very involved high guard. Ruiz has immaculate parrying skills, he does it so quickly and effortlessly, that its nearly imperceptible to the human eye. Every time AJ throws a punch, Ruiz's quick ass hands fly up, catch them, push them out of the way, or swat them away, and he does this with both hands and incessantly, it's almost Golovkin like, it's second nature and reflexive, it's fluid, something that's been ingrained in him for years. It's subtle, not obvious in the least, but it's frustrating as hell to AJ. The fact that no matter how many one twos or combinations he attempts, his punches never quite reach their intended destination, not the rights, the jabs, nothing. And because of that, he can't establish a rhythm, and therefore can't do what he does best, which is walk his man down and inflict damage by wearing him down with the jab, because he's so rarely landing flush on him with anything. That tends to mentally really throw fighters off of their game. Meanwhile, while AJ is trying to land his jab, which is incessantly being parried, Andy's is slowly walking him down, backing him up, throwing him out of his rhythm even more and due to is handspeed, is able to get his jab quickly in and out, consistently doing damage of his own, usually to the body, which is incrementally zapping AJ of all of his energy.

    Ruiz's head movement is exemplary, not only is his head usually constantly just out of range due to his parrying skills and footwork, but when a punch does get through his defense, he rides with it. He takes the stink off of it, by moving his head with the punch as it connects. So by pulling away instead of going into the punch, he greatly lessens its effectiveness. Most boxers do this to a certain extent, even brawlers that go toe to toe, but not as effectively as Ruiz. They always say it's the punch you don't see coming that does the most damage, well that's true. Because you're not defending against it or prepared for it. Therefore you have to absorb the full impact of it. Well aside from the counter left hook that dropped him, he was ready for and rolled with almost everything that was thrown his way. Also the punches that can hurt you the most are the ones you're moving into, see KTFO6 for example. Pac got KTFO, because he jumped chin first into a shot, that Marquez lunged forward putting his full body weight behind. That was literally the definition of sitting down on a punch. Basically it's the equivalent of two rams charging one another and clashing heads. Only one ram at the last minute weaves out of the way and connects flush on the chin of the other unsuspecting ram and puts his lights out.:lol: Well, Ruiz isn't that careless, because unlike most fools, he doesn't rush in.....

    Of course there is the whole chin, mental toughness, focus and powers of recovery of Ruiz thing. Most people buckle and mentally quit when they get tagged and dropped like that. Like AJ. Although, some do not and that's something that can't be taught, you just have it or don't. Ruiz got caught with an absolutely murderous left hook on the button, that shot would have KO'd many fighters cold. He hopped back up and shook it off like it was a flash knockdown. Also, since he recovered from it so quickly and retained his focus, due to his grit and mental toughness, he took the fight to AJ, but responsibly. Because he was cognizant that AJ would be going for the kill, so he calmly waited and using his superior defense, handspeed and timing, with laser focus was able to roll with, time him and immediately counter him and in combination inbetween his punches. Like the serenity in the eye of a hurricane.

    All the while, Ruiz is consistently landing that heavy authoritative jab to the body, and occasionally tossing in snappy fast two punch combos to the gut, causing AJ, who has a terrible gas tank to begin with, to start sucking air and dropping his hands, leaving his head open as a target.

    Also, Andy's offense also serves as his defense. Especially when his opponents are tired. He comes in like a fistic tornado, responsibly, and still jabbing and feinting his way in, then he unleashes the flurry when in range, his opponents automatically shell up or keep their hands at home trying to defend themselves. Meanwhile, his handspeed is so frighteningly fast, he can unleash a 3 or 4, even 6 punch combo, that even if the first two miss or are defended against, the last two will land flush. And speed equals power, especially with heavyweights. After all, what would you rather be hit with? A baseball going 20 miles an hour, or 3 little rubber balls coming at your noggin at 50?

    And last, but far from least. This is the most important aspect of all....

    He lost to Ruiz, not only because Ruiz has better footwork, faster hands and better defense. He lost to him because Andy is an excellent trap setter and an excellent counter-puncher who counter punches in combination. Andy possesses a rare and somewhat unique asset, its his ability to not only ride with a shot. But to set a trap by baiting him in, get him to throw, roll with the punch as it grazes his chin, and then his head follows Joshua's fist BACK OUT as he draws it back in, using it as a momentarily open door to get inside and land on him before he's able to get it off again. It's almost as if Ruiz is reacting to Joshua's punches as if they're magnets pulling him inward, right back into the front door. It's like timing a cuckoo clock and following the cuckoo back in the door after it pops out.:lol: How's that for next level slickness? And yes, that is the next level skillset I'm talking about here.

    Think on what I just laid out, mull it over, fully process it, go check out the fight again after taking all of this in, and you'll see exactly what I saw before I picked Ruiz for the upset.

    Can AJ land a haymaker that puts Ruiz down for the count in the rematch, this is boxing anything is possible. But it's not going to be that easy is it? Ruiz is a riddle, with a boxing IQ that's several levels higher than AJ's, and that's not just something he can learn how to deal with overnight, especially working with trainers that probably aren't even properly processing why they lost in the first place.

    It's not just one of these reasons why AJ lost, its all of them, and in order to beat Ruiz, he's going to have to first decode these copious subtle intangibles that Ruiz brings to the table and learn how deal with every last one of them.

    But let's be honest, skills pay the bills, and like most decent but one dimensional fighters, AJ's hit his ceiling, and that ceiling is more than enough to beat 90% of the Heavyweights out there, but.... not Ruiz. Because Ruiz has his number, and will have the number of countless other Heavyweights in the future. This isn't a fluke, Ruiz is not a joke, there was no lucky punch, because Ruiz landed 59 of them (that's a hell of a lot of lucky punches:lol:), which gradually broke him down, disconnected him from his senses and ultimately took his heart and soul from his body, put them on a plate, and Ruiz put some Adobo seasoning on them and feasted upon it, before AJ's very own eyes. Ruiz won every second of this fight, and made AJ his *****. Its as simple as that.
     
  2. Aydamn

    Aydamn Dillian Whyte #CLEARED like I said he would be Full Member

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    Holy ****, I got you triggered CST80.

    All of that writing!!!!!! I triggered that much emotion in you.

    I'll free up some time in my afternoon to dissect all 1463 words...
     
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  3. CST80

    CST80 The Mercurial Mephistophelean Malcontent Staff Member

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    No one triggered me, I had to explain this to idiots like you that don't fully comprehend the sport of boxing as well as you think you do. Oh yeah, and to shut your ass down and all the other propagandists on this site that like to peddle lies and misinformation, most of which is to only make themselves feel better about themselves for being such idiots to believe in such a flawed fragile false idol to begin with.:D I thrive on tearing bull**** narratives to ribbons. It's kind of my jam (goddamn I hate that term:lol:).
     
  4. BAWA1980

    BAWA1980 Member Full Member

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    It is a pretty long post explaining what many people have already said in much smaller, more succinct posts.
     
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  5. Aydamn

    Aydamn Dillian Whyte #CLEARED like I said he would be Full Member

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    And I like to poke holes in the supposedly pristine narratives which know-it-all's like yourself think are "perfect", it's kind of my bread and butter.

    Skim reading your original post, you make many assumptions, like the version of Dillian Whyte which AJ beat was highly inexperienced, out of shape, and injured... so bringing that fight up to support your argument on AJ's strengths/flaws is completely irrelevant.

    Secondly, we don't have enough information about AJ's ability to adapt following a loss to a fighter like Ruiz, it could really have been an off night for him and he failed to adjust inside the fight (that much we know)... but could he go away, and come back with a reignited sense of purpose, confidence... and strategic adjustments??? WHY NOT, and you are not one to predict whether he can or can't because that's just shooting in the dark.
     
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  6. BoxingABC1

    BoxingABC1 5x WBK Champ Full Member

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    absolutely spot on, people probably still won't comprehend it even with this breakdown....and there's the proof ^^^
     
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  7. HappyClappy

    HappyClappy Member Full Member

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    Well, sortve. But if Joshua walks out there in the rematch and sparks Ruiz in 3 rounds, then yeah, the first fight will be a fluke.

    We can do all the technical analysis we want, but if Ruiz loses, his win in the first fight will go into boxing history as being a fluke.
     
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  8. Aydamn

    Aydamn Dillian Whyte #CLEARED like I said he would be Full Member

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    Ruiz went in as the strong underdog, and AJ was overlooking him. Now the roles are reversed, Ruiz splurging his prize money, living it up like a kid at a candy store with daddy's credit card...

    AJ is used to the money, been there, done that... now he fights for something... and he has been training since the loss... Ruiz has been picking out the colour of the interior for his new Rolls Royce, and sorting out the RGB lighting on his brand new gaming PC.
     
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  9. Mr Icaman

    Mr Icaman 28-0 WBC Peoples Champ + Lineal Full Member

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    Sorry too many words for me to read and tbh you and AJ are the same as MP and Horn...
     
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  10. BoxingABC1

    BoxingABC1 5x WBK Champ Full Member

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    why would it be a fluke? you can't fluke that sort of beatdown. Rahman over Lewis could be seen as a fluke, Douglas over Tyson could be seen as a fluke, Ruiz over AJ definitely cannot be considered a fluke
     
  11. BoxingABC1

    BoxingABC1 5x WBK Champ Full Member

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    AJs opponents are always strong underdogs, Ruiz was no different.

    So he wasn't fighting for anything before the Ruiz fight, just doing it for the ****s and giggles of it?
     
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  12. Aydamn

    Aydamn Dillian Whyte #CLEARED like I said he would be Full Member

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    It is a fluke if AJ wins the second. AJ is only guilty of his inability to adjust inside the fight, some guys like lewis take a shot and stay down from the concussion, AJ just fought on... he fought on with a concussion and had no idea what was going on.

    AJ is tough as nails. He'll make the required adjustments and come back like a beast with a plan.
     
  13. JordanK2406

    JordanK2406 Well-Known Member Full Member

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    A lot of good points tbf and even though I’ve always been an AJ fan, u make some good points there. Feel like AJ IMO hasn’t been the same predator and fighter since the Klitschko fight. That fight made AJ become a lot more cautious and patient which can be an advantage but for AJ it’s in my eyes made him worse and allows for people to get into fights more and gain a foothold and put their stamp on fights like Ruiz did and Parker was able to do. AJ to me needs to change it up for his career honestly
     
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  14. BoxingABC1

    BoxingABC1 5x WBK Champ Full Member

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    Explain how battering someone like that is a fluke? Do you have proof of this apparent concussion btw?
     
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  15. Aydamn

    Aydamn Dillian Whyte #CLEARED like I said he would be Full Member

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    Yeah AJ was not motivated at all, he even gave a documentary on why. He made tons of cash and had four belts, he didn't really care too much.

    Look at Fury, he won his belts then ****ed off to colombia and cocaine, and said "Well ive done it now, Im the champ... now what?"

    So don't act like it doesn't happen.

    AJ is fighting for something now, and he will make the required adjustment and pound Ruiz into oblivion, because Ruiz knows how hard AJ punches.. AJ just didnt get a chance to deliver his punches effectively enough following round 3.
     
    YearZero likes this.


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