Fights that looked fixed to you

Discussion in 'Classic Boxing Forum' started by JC Boxing, Apr 1, 2019.



  1. JC Boxing

    JC Boxing Member Full Member

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    I remember watching Mosely vs Mayweather live and thinking it was fixed after Mosley did nothing past the 2nd round.
     
  2. heerko koois

    heerko koois Boxing Junkie Full Member

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  3. mcvey

    mcvey Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    Carnera v Sharkey2
     
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  4. robert ungurean

    robert ungurean Богдан Full Member

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    Tyson Seldon
    Marciano Walcott 2 still looks iffy to me
     
  5. he grant

    he grant Historian/Film Maker Full Member

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    Mancini Ramirez is a stinker .. the guy decks and fights a near prime Arguello to a split decision loss, gives Rosario life and death twice but gets shut out by Mancini ? I never bought that one ...
     
  6. KuRuPT

    KuRuPT Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Fixed as in corrupt judging or outside influences or just fights where the fighter is seemingly throwing a fight. For example, I believe Don King fixed the Ramirez vs. Whitaker fight in that Pea wasn't going to win a decision. But neither Whitaker nor Ramirez fought any differently and likely didn't know. So are you looking for both or more one than the other?
     
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  7. JC Boxing

    JC Boxing Member Full Member

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    Boxer throwing the match
     
  8. Hannibal Barca

    Hannibal Barca Active Member Full Member

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    Marciano vs Walcott 2
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  9. Hanz Cholo

    Hanz Cholo Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Hopkins vs de La Hoya (Oscar Dive)
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  10. The Long Count

    The Long Count Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Wilder Scott

    Tyson seldon
     
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  11. JC Boxing

    JC Boxing Member Full Member

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    Lol I forgot about Tyson vs Seldon I would cringe when Seldon threw himself to the floor.
     
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  12. Longhhorn71

    Longhhorn71 Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Kid Gavilan vs Johnny Saxton

    The October 1954 defeat on points of Kid Gavilan, who has died aged 77, against Johnny Saxton at Philadelphia's Convention Hall, is widely regarded as one of boxing history's worst decisions. No fewer than 20 of the 22 ringside reporters judged Gavilan to have been the winner. The fight - in an era when gangsters forged close links with the sport - was widely regarded as a fix.

    Gavilan, lost his world welterweight crown that night, and perhaps unjustly, the "Cuban Hawk" is remembered for several reputedly fixed fights. Indeed, shortly before Gavilan unsuccessfully challenged Sugar Ray Robinson for the world title in July 1949, one of his opponents is said to have refused $100,000 to take a dive. Yet despite the murkier aspects of Gavilan's career, a good two decades before Muhammad Ali introduced the "Ali Shuffle", the Cuban was treating spectators to similarly flamboyant showmanship - even incorporating his own dance routine into his fights. Gavilan's legacy to boxing remains the "bolo" punch - half-hook and half-uppercut. That flashy punch is now used far too often, yet few fighters can emulate the lightning, sweeping arc of Gavilan, who claimed to have perfected the motion after years of machete-wielding on Cuban sugar plantations.

    Gavilan was one of the best and most popular pugilists of all time, who thrilled crowds across the world. His July 1952 world title defence against Gil Turner in Philadelphia drew what was then a welterweight record gate. Despite never weighing more than 151 pounds, Gavilan was never knocked out in a 143-fight career. He frequently took on middleweights due to a lack of meaningful opposition in the 147lb welterweight division and he was an early 1950s television favourite.

    His fights against the likes of Sugar Ray Robinson and Ike Williams thrilled New York fight crowds and Gavilan was welterweight champion for three years until that questionable loss to Saxton. In April 1954 Gavilan was outpointed over 15 rounds at Chicago, when challenging Carl "Bobo" Olsen for the world middleweight crown.

    Born Gerardo Gonzalez in Camaguey, Cuba, Gavilan was boxing at 10 and had 60 amateur bouts before his 1943 professional debut in Havana. After losing just once in 24 bouts, he went to the US in 1947. Despite points losses against Williams and Robinson, Gavilan fought himself into title contention within two years, only to be narrowly outpointed by the world welterweight champion Robinson, then at the peak of his career, over 15 rounds in Philadelphia's Municipal Stadium in July 1949.

    In May 1951, the Cuban enjoyed his finest hour by outpointing Johnny Bratton at New York's Madison Square Garden to capture the vacant world welterweight belt. Three months later, Gavilan defeated Billy Graham at the same venue, a victory which prompted some disgruntled observers to dub Graham the "uncrowned welterweight champion". Nevertheless, Gavilan went on to defend the title another five times. His defence against Bobby Dykes in a racially segregated Miami on February 4 1952 was the city's first title bout in which the combatants were black and white.

    After the Saxton loss Gavilan fought until June 1958, finishing with 107 victories against 30 losses and six draws. He moved back to his homeland, anticipating a comfortable retirement. Instead the Cuban government confiscated his ranch and he was effectively penniless when he returned to the US in 1968. He was inducted into boxing's International Hall of Fame in 1990, and despite the loss of his sight, he delighted Miami fans during a testimonial evening in May 2001 by launching an impromptu shadow boxing display which culminated in a perfectly executed bolo punch.
     
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  13. mcvey

    mcvey Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    I think Walcott elected to stay down.I don't think Marciano had any inkling of what was going to happen.To be fair Jersey Joe may not have gone in the ring with the intention of losing,after he got nailed he might just have thought,"I don't want to go through this again." We know Marciano was practising that uppercut in training.
     
  14. mcvey

    mcvey Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    The Graham fight was supposed to be," in the bag"with a bought referee,no one has ever suggested either fighter was party to any wrong-doing.
    Some of Jimmy Carter's results look decidedly odd.
     
  15. 88Chris05

    88Chris05 Active Member Full Member

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    Any excuse to post this....
    This content is protected


    But back to 'real' boxing. As others have said, not necessarily fights where money has been passed or a result pre-arranged, but where there's definitely been something fishy going on.

    Reid versus Ottke. Now the judges' decision was enough to raise eyebrows, as I felt that Reid clearly did enough, albeit not an absolute landslide. But referee Roger Tillerman should never have been allowed anywhere near a boxing ring again after his disgusting performance here. Ottke was unbearably smug throughout the fight - he knew full well he was being protected, and he and Tillerman made zero effort to hide it.

    Ottke spent the first three rounds looking across and complaining to Tillerman for every little (imagined) infraction. Reid was repeatedly warned in the early stages for these 'fouls', whereas Tillerman said nothing when Ottke did far worse. In the fourth round, Ottke charged Reid head-first, the most deliberate butt you could wish to see, and then when in the clinch raises his arm to his supporters, as if to say, "Can you believe I'm getting away with this!?" Not even a peep from Tillerman, of course.

    In the fifth round, Reid was warned for punching Ottke in the face. Seriously. Not a rabbit punch, not a shot landed on the break or after the bell, not a cheap shot when Ottke was looking away etc....Just a simple, mid-range right hand. It landed flush on Ottke, and Tillerman stepped in, broke the action and warned Reid. Unbelievable. In the sixth round, Ottke threw a punch, missed, and fell in to Reid so that their shoulders collided. Cue Tillerman calling it a 'headbutt' by Reid and deducting a point.

    It got to the point where Reid was visibly reluctant to engage or let his hands go, as he just knew that Tillerman would likely disqualify him for having the sheer nerve to, you know, actually hit his boy Ottke.

    Sorry guys, can never help but go on a bit of a rant when it comes to that fight!
     
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