Finding a good coach

Discussion in 'Boxing Training' started by morubbani, Oct 25, 2022.

  1. morubbani

    morubbani New Member Full Member

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    I'm a 16 year old beginner boxer in the UK. I am looking to fight amateur eventually. I go to a boxing gym about 15 mins away from me and have been going their for a few months (actually a year and a few months but I messed my knee up so had to take a year off, making it a few months). I like one of the coaches there, but I feel like they play favourites allot.
    They focus on a few talented young amateurs, and don't really give me any time.
    Also, in sparring it is usually quite hard. Last time, I got battered by some guy much batter than me and feel like I wasn't given the opportunity to practice any skills or learn. That has happened a few times.
    I have considered switching, but I do like one of the coaches. Also, I feel like other gyms in my area (it is not rich in boxing history) will just be the same.
    Though these may be excuses because I'm too much of a ***** to leave my gym and join a new one. Any tips?
     
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  2. Willis Brown

    Willis Brown Member Full Member

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    In the main boxing coaches apart from those related to them make judgments on what they perceive to be ability and attitude, a bit like employers . Ask yourself the question if you were a coach “ what type of student would you invest your time in” ? Turn up on time , have your wraps on , skipping rope etc. etc listen and give it your best for 3 months and if you still feel under valued then consider moving.
     
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  3. morubbani

    morubbani New Member Full Member

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    Oct 26, 2021
    Yea I guess I just haven't shown anything yet. I know where my weaknesses are. In sparring, I often freeze up when the opponent is pressuring me. I forget to move my head and stuff. It's annoying because I know what would help - putting me in situations where I have no choice but to move my head and escape. But they kind of just chuck me in there.
    But to be honest I do still learn a lot and it's kind of just learning on the job.
     
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  4. greynotsoold

    greynotsoold Boxing Addict Full Member

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    A lot of boxing teachers rely on "on the job" learning because that is how they learned.
    The way to attract attention is to work hard, then ask questions.
     
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  5. turpinr

    turpinr Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    I bumped into a lad I used to coach yesterday.
    He used to come to the club and get right down to it, a coaches dream.He trained hard, listened to what he was being told and never bullied anyone in sparring.
    But he wasn't my favourite and coaches shouldn't have favourites but they do.
    I'd say just keep turning up and give it your all.
    If I was coaching in a boxing club and had 10 kids, with half wanting to compete, those 5 would get more attention, even if only 1 looked like he'd make it.
    Very upsetting for coaches to give their all to a kid they think 'has it' only for the kid to stop turning up.
    But there's nothing more gratifying than coaching a kid from showing them the basics of how to get their stance right, up to competition.
    One of the things raw novices and beginners don't or can't do is just relax and breath properly but it will come.
    The lad i spoke to yesterday said he didn't pace himself in his first couple of fights.
    I told him I didn't in mine either.
    Whereabouts in the UK are you ?
     
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  6. turpinr

    turpinr Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Most boxers will tell you they've been hit harder in sparring than in a fight, I know I did.
    Having said that sparring is nothing like an actual fight really.
     
  7. morubbani

    morubbani New Member Full Member

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    Oct 26, 2021
    Yea Im trying to really listen to the coaches and put into practice what they are saying. In the last session, I stayed behind to do some extra drills and they gave me some attention. You guys are right about if you put in the work, they will give you time.
    I've sparred probably about 5 times in total. I am still trying to get comfortable int here and move around. I'm hoping with time I will get used to it. I find that as soon s I get pressured, I just freeze up. But I guess that's just lack of experience.
    I'm down South near Reading.
     
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  8. morubbani

    morubbani New Member Full Member

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    Oct 26, 2021
    Yea you're right. Last session I stayed behind to do some drills and ask questions, and they started to pay attention and stuff.
     
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  9. turpinr

    turpinr Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Righto I'm up in the North West of England.
    Yeah the freezing up will be from inexperience, and after only 5 spars you're probably doing as well as can be expected.
    I've known scores of kids and young adults get discouraged after their first sparring session and give up, so you're ahead of them.
    At least if you're nervous you won't lose concentration.
    Do your coaches get in the ring with you when you're sparring ?
     
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  10. morubbani

    morubbani New Member Full Member

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    Oct 26, 2021
    I though it would be inexperience. We spar once a week so I'm hoping that goes quick. I want to get over this freezing up stage so I can actually practice the skills I drill and learn outside of the ring. But I guess that's how you learn.
    My coaches are on the side of the ring, and they do give me like a hint between rounds. Like last sparring session, he told me to stick the jab harder because I was pawing it too much.
     
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  11. turpinr

    turpinr Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    The pawing will also be from inexperience and the fact you're nervous.Are the jabs dropping short ?
    Once the jabs start landing with you're shoulder behind it, then you'll get more confident
    PS Are you eligible for a skills bout ?
     
  12. morubbani

    morubbani New Member Full Member

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    Oct 26, 2021
    They have been dropping short. I think that definitely is making me nervous because my shots are missing but theirs are landing. What I struggle with is getting in and out of range. I watched a video about it on YouTube, and it said that when we shadowbox and do heavy bog, we often start off in range and rarely practice getting in and out. So that's kind of what I'm focussing on now. Just trying to get in, land the jab, and get out.
    I also find that my form just completely goes when I spar. When shadowboxing I keep my hands up and my footwork is good, I keep my balance and don't really lunge too much. But when I spar I get a bit sloppy. I guess that is because of nervousness and fear of getting hit.
     
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  13. turpinr

    turpinr Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Getting in and out of range is a lot harder than it sounds so don't be too discouraged.
    When I coached I had the kids take a step into range on the pads or bags, land a punch or punches, then you either step put of range or roll under a counter, pivot, what have you.
    I also had them just taking a step forwards, one-two then stepping back as a drill or in shadow boxing but as I say getting into range and out again is not as easy as it looks
    A lot of it is down to speed or fainting with your shoulder, feet, head, gloves.
    The master at staying in that zone where you can throw punches and also be hit is GGG, he's always there.
     
  14. morubbani

    morubbani New Member Full Member

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    Oct 26, 2021
    Yea I've been practicing feinting before I step in and also moving my head as I come in. That's another thing that goes when I spar, my headd movement. So I've been really trying to drill that in
    Yea I have studied a bit of GGG. The way he cuts off the ring is incredible. He so seamlessly steps laterally to cut off routes. It's like he doesn't think about it
     
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  15. turpinr

    turpinr Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Greats like him make it look easy don't they ?
    Head movement is another thing that isn't as easy as it looks.I could ride punches fairly well but I wasn't very hot at slipping them.
    The thing is with feinting, you have to be near enough for your sparring partner for him to believe you're in range otherwise they won't worry.