Got absolutely Tuned up yesterday

Discussion in 'Boxing Training' started by pistal47, Aug 16, 2019.



  1. pistal47

    pistal47 Boxing Addict Full Member

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    By a 16 year old kid. It was my first time back in the ring in over a year, just a few rounds of sparring. I'm 36, getting back to good shape, but NOTHING felt right yesterday. Couldnt get into a rythm, timing and accuracy were way off, I felt so slow and uncoordinated, and my physical attributes were always what I relied on. For the first time in a ring I felt old.

    It's not a big deal, a little wounded pride, but has anyone taken over a year off around my age and come back and picked up where they left off? It's my favorite hobby in the world, but maybe its time to close the book on competing? I was out for over a year because my right orbital bone had been badly fractured in 2 places, had surgery and healed properly. Going back today, but starting to realize it might just ve time to hang it up in regards to sparring and competing.
     
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  2. jimmyonebomb

    jimmyonebomb Member Full Member

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    I'v been in the same position a couple of years ago when 34, got done in by a 17 year old after sitting on me arse for 9 months ha! It knocks your confidence a bit but i got back into fighting shape by persevering, i felt in incredible shape but an old injury flared up and i had to take time out again. Im 36 myself now and considering another crack, tried to just go gym do weights but get bored.

    Anyway back to you! Theres a possibility you are feeling a bit old, but, if youve had over a year out the ring then your timing, accuracy, speed etc are gonna feel bad to a boxer whos training and ready to go, whether their 16 20 30 etc. If you really wanna have another go just see how it goes
     
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  3. gerryb

    gerryb Active Member Full Member

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    Theres a reason why most people retire at your age man. Not putting you off or down but unless theres an age category you can compete in where you are up against guys of a similar age? You are up against a fairly large handicap and that handicap is time. Father time catches up.
     
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  4. pistal47

    pistal47 Boxing Addict Full Member

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    I just do it for fun and as a hobby at this point. Officially I only have 7 amateur bouts under me so I'm still a novice and not in open class. But maybe you're right, thats something ive been thinking a lot about this past weekend. I worry that I will lose interest in training if its not focused towards the goal of competing. Life is tough and that would be a tough pill to swallow for sure, but maybe one I will have to in the very near future.
     
  5. gerryb

    gerryb Active Member Full Member

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    i was a competitive powerlifter man right up till i was 41,i miss the competition,the training for competition and the camaraderie. I was lost for a few years after my last comp and its very hard to let go. Its not like i was losing either,i was cleaning up in my age category before i had to quit . Without a goal to work towards,lifting seems a waste of time. So i agree,if it makes you happy,keep going. Just fighting younger guys man,they have the advantage of youth.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
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  6. pistal47

    pistal47 Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Camaraderie, thats the big thing for me. And something I really don't want to lose right now. I was always an active athlete my whole life, and when sports ended for me my freshman year of college after I blew out my right knee, things went south quickly and I didnt know why. In retrospect, it was the loss of camaraderie. When I enlisted in the Marine Corps., I got it back, though to be honest I was ****ing pissed off for a little. My plan was to try out for their boxing team but Iraq kicked off and my battalion needed everyone they could get, so it backfired in a way because I was stuck in the infantry for 4 years and 10 months but it was a blessing too. Greatest Brotherhood you could ever ask for. I got out, and again my life spiraled out of control, and again i didnt knoww why. Again, it was the loss of camaraderie. People around me all said it was PTSD -- except I dont ****ing have PTSD. I enlisted in the military again, but this time the Navy.

    My life is enjoyable and fulfilling when I have the big "C" word in my life, and when I don't I usually end up self-medicating with hard drugs and alcohol. But right now I'm at the point when I seriously need to consider stopping the competition aspect. Ive fought in tons and tons of smokers and things like that, sparred tons over the years as well. Its all adding up to a lot of knocks to the head. Couple those with all the years playing American football and my time in the Corps with all the blasts from breaching charges, C4, Semtex and whatnot that you're exposed to, and it's probably time to hang em up. I just have to find something to take its place.

    I wouldnt even think about it if I weren't a parent, but scarily, I am so what I choose has to be the best choice for my children.
     
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  7. DJN16

    DJN16 Well-Known Member Full Member

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    W
    When I was 24, out of shape and weighed 87 kilos, I was outclassed in sparring by a 16 year old internationalist who Weighed 69kgs.

    Slightly different circumstances but the 16 yr old bit got me reminiscing.

    My advice would be don't spar for another 4 - 6 weeks. Work on your fitness and technique while getting your weight down a few kilos assuming this is the case.

    Assess yourself then, you will know.
     
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  8. pistal47

    pistal47 Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Great advice, I think I always knew it was too soon but I've been stuck in a city thats known for its boxing and there isn't much else to do during the week so I jumped back into it too soon and got my ass handed to me. I'm the all or nothing type, which really backfires on me a lot, especially instances like this. For some reason taking things slowly is so hard for me as opposed to jumping in a shark tank head first, and no amount of beatings is likely to change that. But your right bud, I gotta pump the brakes and get back in there when I'm finally ready.
     
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  9. DJN16

    DJN16 Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Definitely mate. Regardless of your instinctive nature, longevity is the key in boxing. Knowing when to spar, timing it right. Especially in your 30s. Getting hit is no joke.
     
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  10. greynotsoold

    greynotsoold Boxing Addict Full Member

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    If you have always relied on physical attributes, change your approach. Spend some time and mental energy learning how to utilize positioning and distance to nullify an opponent's advantages while using your attributes to your advantage.

    It will keep you in the gym learning and sparring and it will make the young guys box smarter.
     
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