How many amateur fights is enough?

Discussion in 'World Boxing Forum' started by Ted Stickles, Apr 5, 2021.

  1. f1ght3rz

    f1ght3rz Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    You can not compare the US Amateur boxing system with the European one.

    In Europe you have a lot of club boxing so you have several fights in a month. If you participate in these leagues and competitions you have like 40-50 fights per year.

    I think the US system is much, much better because it's more friendly for the athletes. Boxing in Europe on the amateur level is brutal and sometimes these guys are already done before even reaching the pro ranks.

    There is also the tendency that Europeans leaving the Amateur ranks later. There are a lot of Europens who are still amateurs in their late 20s while in the US it's more common to turn pro early in the 20s because boxing is a much bigger sports over there.

    I don't think there is a right answer for the question how many amateur fights you should have before turning pro. It depends on a lot of things. My feeling tells me 50-100 is a good number if you have the skills and physical attributes to turn pro.
     
  2. Surrix

    Surrix Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Yes.
    Depends from country. A lot of european countries are pretty new in pro boxing and pro promotions in these is not like in U.K, where U.K had pro boxing as casual thing before 1914 th, a lot of countries in europe had pro boxing allowed in 1992 th. :(
    There are countries different in size, some country does have 1-5 mil inhabitants, some country like U.K is with dense and large population and enough large cities with metropolitan area: good thing for pro boxing.
    You can't compare traditions and opportunities in Ukraine or Finland or even Denmark if compare with U.K or U.S.
     
  3. ShovelHook

    ShovelHook Boxing Addict Full Member

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    I'm 22, turning 23 soon. I've only fought people my age and so far so good, I was going to enter the Irish national championships this year but covid scuppered that. No matter though, I'll enter next year with even more training and experience under my belt so I should do well. I started boxing late enough but I'm a very quick learner and apparently I was much better as a beginner than most people. I also train very diligently, always ask for technical advice and have a passion for the sport so I should do okay at least. I also have the kind of mind that suits the sport where I automatically think to set traps, I recognise openings when they're there and I can anticipate what will come back at me. I'm also not stupid where I drop my hands all the time, I always retract my hands quickly to my chin after punching. It's my favourite sport because you're always on your toes, having to think about your next move.
     
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  4. Surrix

    Surrix Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Well, if you are from Ireland this is not bad for pro boxing. Irish ppl are around all world and and also in U.S and U.K.
    If you are high level accomplished amateur you might sign with bob ( they does have Paddy D from Ireland for example ), frank or di bella, maybe even eddie.

    If no, then you will start with small hall ( club ) boxing proms and there too level is different: from undervalued just because small shows boxers who are very dangerous ( a lot of champs had started in club level ) till absolute bags. Depends from matchmaking etc.

    Ireland is not bad country for pro boxing, U.K too is close.
     
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  5. Surrix

    Surrix Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Regards who you might get in amateur boxing, I had 10 am KB fights under belt when I had my first am boxing fight.
    Third boxer they had gave me to fight with was with 7-4 ( 3 stoppage wins, 4 fights lost on points and 4 wins via points ) am KB and 2-0 am boxing record ( 1 win via points, 1 win via ref stoppage ). My am boxing record then was 1-1.
     
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  6. RazzAxx

    RazzAxx Active Member Full Member

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    This post is so off that it is actually funny. To see someone post such and ignorant and self-satisfied post while not knowing anything about the European /Eastern European athletes development systems. Is VERY hilarious.
    :D

    Please do explain the concept of *club boxing* and in which countries you are referring to have that trait in *amateur* boxing and who are the big names that have emerged into the olympics from *club boxing*
    :D
     
  7. ShovelHook

    ShovelHook Boxing Addict Full Member

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    With MTK being Irish I'm pretty sure I'll be quite well sorted if I ever want to turn pro, all I need to do is perform reasonably well at national level and perhaps win an intervarsity championship too (I've basically got that in the bag). There's also the Universiade, it's like the Olympics for college students, but their last two editions haven't had any boxing event for some reason which is a pity. Anyways, when it comes to the pros I've heard MTK take good care of their fighters financially and frankly I don't care that they're basically a money laundering operation for Ireland's largest drug cartel. They also have good relations with all of the big promotions, so I wouldn't even need to pick a promoter if I have them as my management.
     
  8. Surrix

    Surrix Well-Known Member Full Member

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    MTK might not be bad.
    Unless they might gave you someone like Bolotņiks to fight with or maybe someone like Yarde ( he almost had finished Kovalev in distance ).
     
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  9. f1ght3rz

    f1ght3rz Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    You're obviously pretty dumb because you're mixing all things together in here. There isn't one amateur system or level. The amateur ranks are complex and there are a lot of different levels we can talk about. You're probably got butthurt because you think i discredited the European Amateur scene. Grow up, little boy and stop crying.

    But let's get straight to the topic...

    You want an example? For a guy who competed at the Olympics and in club boxing?

    Well, i'm obviously better informed about the country i live in (Germany) so i have two examples for you.

    1. Felix Sturm from the old generation. He was a club boxer (for my local club btw) and went to the Olympics afterwards. He was a world champion by the way. So i guess he's a very good example. It was obviously 20-25 years ago when he was an Amateur but the concept is still there in some countries.

    2. Erik Pfeifer in the new generation. Pfeifer went to the Olympics twice (2012 & 2016) and is a Bronze Medalist at the WCs twice (2011, 2013). He fought a lot in club boxing for different clubs like BC Hanau.

    So what do you want to tell me with your bull**** post?

    The European amateur system is very complex and not linear. And there is the big difference to the US system that you have a lot of countries with club boxing parallel to the Amateur tournaments like national championships or international ones.

    You should really get your facts straight dude before attacking people in here. You look like a total clown now. I never said ALL Amateur boxers are competing in club boxing. It depends on the national culture of boxing but a lot of countries have that club boxing thing like the UK, Germany, Poland, Czech Republic and a couple of more countries. Never said it's the case in ALL European countries and never said ALL Amateur boxers are part of it.

    So dude...either you want to discuss it properly or just GTFOH and don't quote me and don't talk to me.
     
  10. RazzAxx

    RazzAxx Active Member Full Member

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    Are you claiming that Sturm never was a part of national German Olympic/World championship training program and was just a club fighter?

    Get the f outta here with your bull****. The other one I don't even recognize, so whatever, with him.
     
  11. ShovelHook

    ShovelHook Boxing Addict Full Member

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    I fight at a very low weight so I wouldn't worry there. I'll probably cut all the way down to strawwweight (105lbs/47.5kgs) which is the lowest weight class. It's honestly a blessing that I'm so light, I'll have quite the advantage starting off in a relatively weaker division. I also punch way above my weight class, in my first fight in the amateurs I weighed in as a flyweight and fought a featherweight and I stopped him easily.
     
  12. OvidsExile

    OvidsExile God Bless America Full Member

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    Anything over 100 is probably a waste of time. If you don't fast track a fighter after they get world amateur or Olympic medals, you are just sabotaging their pro career, limiting their legacy. Almost all of the best fighters had world titles by the time they were 24. I have nothing but disdain for guys like Lomachenko who hung around the amateur ranks bum bashing for a decade, beating up on inexperienced children. There's no good reason to be a Felix Savon, Teofilo Stevenson, or Laszlo Papp if you live in countries where boxing is legal.

    What the **** was **** McTaggart's problem? 610-24? Was he just afraid to fight Joe Brown, Carlos Ortiz, Duilio Loi, and Flash Elorde in the pro ranks? Did he hate money?

    Duran and Chavez were done with that **** by fight twenty or thirty. Pacquiao turned pro at 16 after about fifty. If they wanted more experience and rounds then they added some easy pro fights and fought ten times a year. Beats paying for sparring partners, I guess.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2021
  13. Surrix

    Surrix Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Papp was in country where professional boxing did not had existed. Boxe was his life and he fought after his hands had been damaged and still he was great even in pros when he was old and over the hill. His era ammy boxing was brutal and sharp not like modern boxing and he had stopped a lot of guys in " ***** ammies ".

    About inexperienced childern in high level amateur tournaments I might tell you that agendas are different.
    For example with one boxer: when he had just amateur title in large country in youngsters division, he had approx 30 stoppage wins under belt. He even wasn't continental, not alone world medalist. No name kid for us.
    Imagine how much " kid " he was?
    How did had beat ppl ammy boxers from 50 ies and early - mid sixties. Sissy fights of course.

    A lot of them had more stoppage wins than notable pros in pro ranks.

    In very high level amateur tournaments you will not have for example boxers with 0-11 fight record like it is easily possible in pro ranks, so big question is where more bummy boxers are.

    With 0-11 ammy record ammy gym will not place you in local tournaments cos this might impact their chances to get new clients.
    Pro bag? Yeah, if you please, someone booked and turn into 0-12. Btw some discussed here boxers had fought such kind of bags.
     
  14. Surrix

    Surrix Well-Known Member Full Member

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    This yeah.
    Now if you are not in North Korea or Cuba, then after such medals you might get some managers and promoters who will offer you something and place you in A side corner at least to test. Cool if with you they also are able to sell tickets.
    Medal like any Oly or World Championship medal, continental championship medal is good thing.
     
  15. Surrix

    Surrix Well-Known Member Full Member

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    There is cool pro boxing record with notable boxer. World beater.
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