How much Protein per day..?

Discussion in 'Boxing Training' started by nufc_jay, Feb 22, 2012.


  1. nufc_jay

    nufc_jay Guest

    There seems to be mixed messages regarding how much protein is ideal to intake when training regularly, depending of course on your training regime and goals.

    I hear some people saying it should be around 40-60g per day and other saying 1g per lb of bodyweight.

    Now I way approximately 194lbs, I train fairly intensly at Kickboxing 4 times a week which is a mixture of fitness, techniques and sparring.
    Additionally, on days I don't Kickbox I work out at home with free weights, nothing heavy (I don't have the kit) around 12kg on a dumbell doing shoulder presses, bicep curls, bent over rows, shrugs e.t.c...

    My overall goal is to lose weight (which I'm slowly doing through calorific defecit and working out) whilst maintaining (increasing if possible) muscle mass.

    So with that in mind, how much would you recommend I should intake per day with regards Protein. Currently it's about 120g per day and I have cut my calorific intake right down to around 1200 calories per day...

    Thanks
     
  2. MURDR63

    MURDR63 Member Full Member

    194
    0
    Sportsbook:
    1,000
    Feb 14, 2012
    I'm in the group that suggests 1g per lb of weight, but there is no "correct" amount. I usually make sure I consume more than 1g/lb just to be safe and make sure I get enough.
     
  3. lefty

    lefty Boxing Addict Full Member

    5,804
    0
    Sportsbook:
    1,000
    Apr 29, 2006
    On your kickboxing days take in more calories and on your weight days take in less, adjust it for your activity levels. Timing of protein seems to be more important than overall intake, before and after sessions. 120g over a day should be plenty, being on a calorie deficit you'll probably be using more protein for energy so you could even eat a bit more protein especially on weight training and rest days. On your days of kickboxing you'll want to be getting in enough carbs so that should be your number one priority over protein, the extra carbs will help spare the protein you take in anyway.
    It's close to impossible to increase muscle mass while being on a calorie deficit, 1200 calories does sound very low as well btw.
    To maintain your muscle mass you need to lose weight slowly, 1200 calories would probably result in quicker losses.
    Doing it slowly, doing strength training and timing of recovery macros is the key to losing weight with minimal strength/muscle mass loss.
    I don't like the exercices you're doing to be honest and that amount of weight wouldn't be doing anything for a guy of your size.
    With the dumbells you could do turkish get ups and various squatting/full body multijoint exercises for more benefit. Do you have anywhere to do pull ups/dips? Doing pushups would be better for you in terms of functional strength and probably be harder for you with your size than your dumbell exercises.
     
  4. nufc_jay

    nufc_jay Guest


    Thanks for that, I forgot to mention I do a pushup regime every day which varies, some days I'll just bang out 100 pushups as explosive as possible in 2 sets of 50
    Other days I'll do 50 normal push ups straight into 30 between the floor and half way stright into 30 between half way and up if you catch my drift so I do do a fair amount which i find ****s me up pretty good!
     
  5. BladeJrs

    BladeJrs N/A Full Member

    404
    0
    Sportsbook:
    1,000
    Oct 19, 2007
    It's actually the opposite lefty. It's more important to look at overall intake than timing. That kind of timing only comes into play if you're doing multiple workouts in a day; otherwise you'll replenish everything by the time of your next workout the next day, whether you try to time intake specifically or not. :)
     
  6. KiengKoopa

    KiengKoopa New Member Full Member

    4
    0
    Sportsbook:
    1,000
    Jan 24, 2011
    1200 calories for a 194lbs is quite low. Especially since you said you want to "possibly" gain muscle. It is very hard to build muscle during a calorie deficit, unless you are new to weight lifting. However, you can "maintain" your current muscle if you drop your calories 300-500 below your maintenance.

    As stated above, 1200 calories is pretty low for being 194 lbs. Along with that you are highly active. You may want to find your maintenance level and subtract 300-500 cals from it. You may drop the weight slower but you'll minimize the muscle loss.
     
  7. I dont know how you function on 1200 cals, that seems so low i feel im restricting myself at 2000 if i were cutting and im alot smaller than you, good luck with it tho dude..
     
  8. death

    death Active Member Full Member

    758
    0
    Sportsbook:
    1,000
    Apr 11, 2008

    1200 calories is only "quite low" for 195Ibs physical active male? I would consider that an extreme case of an eating disorder right there. Hell, one big bowl of oatmeal with one egg is roughly 400 cal right there. Come on man.
     
  9. happydrinks

    happydrinks directfraction.storenvy.com Full Member

    5,176
    0
    Sportsbook:
    1,000
    Sep 14, 2009
    0.7 - 1grams x bodyweight in lbs.

    Also, why are you doing bicep curls?
     
  10. lefty

    lefty Boxing Addict Full Member

    5,804
    0
    Sportsbook:
    1,000
    Apr 29, 2006
    Nah it is actually the timing, after a workout you have a window for increased protein synthesis. Overall intake really isn't too important when it comes to protein. What you're talking about is the case for carb intake.
     
  11. Earl-hickey

    Earl-hickey Boxing Junkie booted

    14,019
    1
    Sportsbook:
    1,000
    Oct 31, 2010
    1 grap per pound id to bulk up and gan muscle, if you are training for boxing something like 0.6-0.7g per lb would seem to me to be about right because its used for a different purpose
     
  12. lefty

    lefty Boxing Addict Full Member

    5,804
    0
    Sportsbook:
    1,000
    Apr 29, 2006
    You hear this sort of thing all the time but the science doesn't back it up. Bulking up is about total calories and timing of protein for maximum effect. Eating lots of protein just makes you good at using protein for energy, if you eat plenty of carbs it spares the protein to actually repair muscle.
     
  13. MURDR63

    MURDR63 Member Full Member

    194
    0
    Sportsbook:
    1,000
    Feb 14, 2012
    OP, I'd recommend you start eating a lot more. he average inactive person burns around 2000 calories a day from daily activities. As someone who works out, you most likely burn a lot more than that. If you want to lose weight but maintain muscle, as Kieng said, you want to burn NO MORE than 500 calories less than you burn.

    Also, if you really want to gain muscle, no offense, but 12kg DBs won't really do much, especially with shrugs, as that is not even close to enough weight to gain muscle in your traps.
     
  14. BladeJrs

    BladeJrs N/A Full Member

    404
    0
    Sportsbook:
    1,000
    Oct 19, 2007
    Im speaking of protein too. You're speaking in old fashioned myth, sir.

    You can read further in the actual journals/research cited in such articles as these:
    "Tipton and colleagues (2003) examined responsiveness of protein synthesis for a day after a workout, and found it to reflect a 24 hour enhanced level. That’s right folks, a FULL DAY! This means that having a morning shake will have the same impact on muscle protein synthesis as one consumed following the workout!
    These results shouldn’t be too surprising because we’ve known for over a decade that postworkout protein synthesis is jacked up for this long (MacDougall et al., 1995), but if you’re discovering this for the first time, then it’s pretty exciting!
    Some research suggests that even 48 hours after the workout our protein synthesis levels can be elevated by ~33% (Phillips et al., 1997), giving us an even longer period during which we can maximize our muscle growth with protein drinks."
     
  15. lefty

    lefty Boxing Addict Full Member

    5,804
    0
    Sportsbook:
    1,000
    Apr 29, 2006
    That's nonsense, you need to read the articles and think for yourself. Yes protein synthesis is increased for an extended period but we're talking about the Optimal time and when you'll get the best results even if your protein intake isn't at a high level. Read some current research and you'll see why sports nutritionists place more of an emphasis on timing now rather than total intake.

     


Advertisement