James J. Corbett vs. Marvin Hart/Tommy Burns (over 20 rounds)

Discussion in 'Classic Boxing Forum' started by The Fighting Yoda, Apr 24, 2021.

  1. The Fighting Yoda

    The Fighting Yoda Member Full Member

    320
    464
    Jan 5, 2021
    Who would win? (each prime)
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2021
  2. BitPlayerVesti

    BitPlayerVesti Boxing Hagiographer Full Member

    6,945
    8,022
    Oct 28, 2017
    I'd pick Corbett against both.

    With Hart I am more hesistant given the Sharkey fights, though it's hard to take much of anything from them, but I'm honestly not sure Hart was as good as Sharkey, and he certainly wasn't as strong.
     
    The Fighting Yoda likes this.
  3. janitor

    janitor Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

    65,257
    14,328
    Feb 15, 2006
    I would actually give Hart a good chance.

    I don't think that Corbett would have liked his pressure orientated style.
     
    The Fighting Yoda likes this.
  4. Kamikaze

    Kamikaze Being happy means having less. Full Member

    1,898
    2,060
    Oct 12, 2020
    Yet he would school Tua?
     
    mrkoolkevin and Bukkake like this.
  5. BitPlayerVesti

    BitPlayerVesti Boxing Hagiographer Full Member

    6,945
    8,022
    Oct 28, 2017
    Ali schooled Foreman and struggled with Frazier, so it's really not that out there.

    Obviously one triangles is a considerably higher level than the other.
     
  6. Bukkake

    Bukkake Boxing Addict Full Member

    4,526
    2,317
    Apr 20, 2010
    I haven't seen Hart, so it's hard to tell, how a fight between him and Corbett would pan out.

    As for Burns... well, he's actually one of the few from that time, who looks decent. And since Corbett looks not quite as decent (I'm being kind here!), I think I'd put my money on Burns in this fantasy match-up.
     
    The Fighting Yoda likes this.
  7. janitor

    janitor Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

    65,257
    14,328
    Feb 15, 2006
    Why would you assume that Tua was better than Hart?

    It's not even like you can look at the film and decide that he was crap.
     
  8. Kamikaze

    Kamikaze Being happy means having less. Full Member

    1,898
    2,060
    Oct 12, 2020
    Tua would devour the souls of every single fighter from 1890s-1920s with ease and it haunts you.
     
    mrkoolkevin likes this.
  9. Kamikaze

    Kamikaze Being happy means having less. Full Member

    1,898
    2,060
    Oct 12, 2020
    See Tua, then see Corbett he was one of that generations most skilled fighters, shockingly David was better in every department and he was a caveman by todays standard.
     
  10. janitor

    janitor Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

    65,257
    14,328
    Feb 15, 2006
    Given his results in his own era, I have to seriously doubt that proposition.
     
  11. Kamikaze

    Kamikaze Being happy means having less. Full Member

    1,898
    2,060
    Oct 12, 2020
    That is a silly argument X did good in B era so he beats C
    You should look at the film it is more telling then prestige in a shallow era.
     
  12. janitor

    janitor Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

    65,257
    14,328
    Feb 15, 2006
    OK let's look at the film.

    You obviously don't need to be a bigger version of Sugar Ray Robinson to outbox Tua.

    I don't think that a left hook and not much else, is going to be enough for him to dominate any era quite frankly.
     
  13. Kamikaze

    Kamikaze Being happy means having less. Full Member

    1,898
    2,060
    Oct 12, 2020
    Yes, but you have have to be more then Jim Corbett to beat David.
     
  14. reznick

    reznick In the 7.2% Full Member

    15,854
    7,053
    Mar 17, 2010
    Corbett looks good on film, once you get past the fact that he was filmed in the oldest feature length film ever created in the history of mankind.

    That’s quiiite the handicap.
     
    janitor likes this.
  15. janitor

    janitor Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

    65,257
    14,328
    Feb 15, 2006
    What was Jim Corbett?

    I personally think that he was overrated for a long time, but he was obviously very good at not getting hit.

    The guys just feinted with every part of his body, and never seemed to present any sort of stationary target.

    The one thing that is obvious form ringside reports, is that he clowned pretty much everybody that he fought.

    There is nothing that Tua knew, that was not in the boxing manuals back then.

    I do not think my pick to be particularly ostentations, given the styles of the two fighters, their respective records, or even their physical proportions.

    Would I be shocked if Tua knocked out Corbett?

    No, because most of the top punchers that eh fought caught up with him eventually.

    However those were men who made better use of their opportunities, and had longer to do so.

    Fighters like Tua, never get to the top, without an absolute commitment to their style, and he didn't have it!