Joseph Terrence "Terry" McGovern the Terrible, some fight reports

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  1. BitPlayerVesti

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    Pedlar Palmer with Ted Kid Lewis
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    Vs Fred Snyder
    The Philadelphia Record - 30 Sep 1899, page 14 (second column to the right)
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    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    Billy Rotchford fought a lot of top fighters including Pedlar Palmer, Young Corbett II and Jimmy Barry. I'll have to go back and try and find those fights at some point.
    Vs Billy Rotchford
    The Champaign Daily News, Volume 5, Number 62, 10 October 1899
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    I also stumbled upon this
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    They are doing a project to digitise the local newspapers in Illinois
     
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    THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1899. Page 6
    MEETS PALMER'S FATE
    ROTCHFORD IS KNOCKED OUT BY M'GOVERN IN ONE ROUND.
    Brooklyn Champion Practically Settles the Tattenall's Conteast in Less than a Minute, Though the End Does Not Come Until After Two and a Quarter Minutes of Fighting-Chicago Man Knocked Down a Number of Times.
    Terry McGovern, bantam weight champion, added another knockout to his fast Increasing list last night. In two minutes and fifteen seconds of actual fighting he disposed of Billy Botchford In their bout at Tattersall's. The contest was practically ended in less than a minute, as the little fighting cyclone planted his powerful right on the Jaw, flooring his opponent and dazing him to such an extent that for the remainder of the time he staggered around the ring in a helpless condition.
    It was the case of a world-beater against a man who once gave promise of becoming a top-notcher, but who Is far from being in the physical condition necessary to stand the strain of a hard encounter.
    It was McGovern's first appearance not only In Chicago but in the West. Nevertheless, fresh from his international victory over Pedlar Palmer, the English champion, McGovern did not prove as great anattraction as the parade of all nations, The preliminary bouts were witnessed by a slim crowd, and although the main event was delayed until 11:40 the attendance for the windup was about 2,000.
    Two Burmese jugglers, Moun Coon and Moun Chit, attired in Oriental costume, were interested spectators.
    Rotchford was the first to enter the ring, attended by Teddy Murphy and Joe Choynskl. He was given a fair reception. McGovern came a minute later, the crowd rising to get a glimpse of the wonderful Brooklyn boy as he filed down the aisle. His seconds were Harry Forbes and Sam Harris, his manager. He was accorded a rousing cheer and bowed his acknowledgements.
    McGovern ln Fine Condition.
    Paddy Carroll, who had been mutually agreed upon as referee, announced that the men would fight straight Queensberry rules, but that if both were on their feet at the end of the six rounds there would be no decision. Thla announcement was received with some little signs of dissent, but as Carroll explained that his announcement was made for the benefit of those who had wagers on the bout, it received the approval of the majority.
    MeGovern looked the picture of health, his ruddy color being in strong contrast to the pallid complexion of his opponent. Rotchford did not look hopeful, and was evidently nervous, a condition which had no time to wear off.
    At the tap of the gong both crouched a trifle and fiddled fast. McGovern's footwork was a treat to watch, his movements being both graceful and agile. McGovern led with a light left for the body, and Rotchford countered on the shoulder. It was the only blow the Chicagoan appeared to land, for McGovern immediately sent a full right swing to the point of the jaw, toppling over his opponent Rotchford staid down till the count of eight, and then struggled to his feet and staggered a few steps. McGovern knew he had the battle won and did not rush in, but waited till Rotchford was again in sparring position. Then he sent his left to the jaw, and again Rotchford dropped. He scrambled to his feet, but was again floored with a right jolt and staid down six seconds. McGovern followed him as he staggered into his own corner with his head down. McGovern sent in left and right swings, but could not reach a vital spot, and Rotchford was forced through the ropes. He wa s down eight seconds. The end soon came, as McGovern whipped in a right uppercut on the point of the jaw and Rotchford toppled over in a heap. His seconds threw up the sponge. It wa s thought at first his jaw was broken, but on examination it was found to be all right.
    It was to some extent a pathetic victory, and the crowd, though cheering the champion as he climbed down from the ring, had many expressions of sympathy for Rotchford.
    The battle was quite similar to McGovern's victory over Pedlar Palmer a month ago, and lasted just about as long. The main difference was that McGovern got in on Rotchford with a full swing something he did not do with Palmer, whom he fought at close quarters all the time.
    Results of Preliminaries.
    "Kid" Bernstein was given the decision over Jack Nelson, colored, who is better known as "Moonshine," They fought six spirited rounds, which kept the crowd on edge. Nelson caused amusement by refusing to take his chair at the end of the first round. Later on he was glad of the accommodation. Bernstein had a lead on points in the first five rounds, though Nelson sent horns several good swings to the head in the last round, which came near getting him a draw. Both were tired at the finish and clinched repeatedly.
    Kid Gleason won all the way from Young Kelly, the latter's seconds throwing up the sponge in the middle of the fourth round. They met at 130 pounds. Kelly, though game and willing, knew little about the game. Gleason gradually wore him down with jabs and body punches. There were no knockdowns, but Kelly grew weaker and weaker and had no chance of winning. He was cheered for his gameness.
    Jim Adams, the man with the fighting face, knocked out Jack Beausbolte after one minute's fighting. Adams was announced as weighing 145 pounds and Beausbolte as 166. After a short exchange and a clinch they broke and each swung left and right at long range. Adams then swung a sledge hammer right which landed flush on the jaw, sending Beausbolte down and out.
    Jim Larkins, announced as weighing 112 pounds, but looking to be nearer 120, had a considerable advantage In height, strength, and reach over Slg Hart, who was announced as weighing 106 pounds. Despite this disparity the crowd urged Larkins to knock out his man. This he failed to do, although he scored by far the most points and was the aggressor throughout. He sent in many good body blows and Hart wa s kept busy ducking and blocking. Larkins fiddled so fast it was thought he would tire himself out. Hart could not hit him effectively, though he brought blood in the sixth round with a left on the nose. Larkins was wild in many of his attacks and Hart was not damaged greatly at the finish.
     
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    The Chicago Sunday Tribune NOVEMBER 19, 1899
    KNOCKS THEM BOTH OUT.
    ALL FIGHTERS LOOK ALIKE TO CHAMPION TERRY M'GOVERN
    He Defeats Patsy Haley in One Round at Tattersall's ansd Follows a Little Later by Retiring Billy Smith in Three Ronnds — Eight Thousand People Watch the Little Brooklyn Wonder Perform the Feat—Several Interesting Preliminaries
    Terry McGovern, probably the greatest fighter of his weight the world has ever seen, won fresh fistic honors at Tattersall'a last night. In one minute and forty seconds he knocked out Patsey Haley of Buffalo, and then, after a rest of twenty minutes, gav e "Turkey Point Billy" Smith of Philadelphia his quietus after one minute of fighting in the third round.
    Eight thousand people saw him accomplish the dual performance and went away wondering at the marvelous skill and strength of the little fighting machine from Brooklyn. Two such decisivce defeats effectually dispose of any theory of accident in his encounter with Pedlar Palmer , the British champion.
    Long before the time set for the opening bout the crowd began arriving , and so great was the crush that it took late comers at least fifteen minutes to reach the ticke office. Inside the hall the crowd taxed the seating capacity to its utmost, except in the cheaper sections at the south end. Around the ringside, filling the boxes and reserve d seats, was a dense crowd of humanity, while up where the gallery gods were located some were perched on places of vantage with their heads almost touching the roof.
    It was one of the largest crowds ever gathered in the building for a similar event , and It is safe to say not one of the spectators went away dissatisfied . Of the five bouts scheduled four resulted In knockouts , and in each instance it came quickly . There was no battering of an opponent down to a state of weakness.
    Their Chance is Feeble.
    Haley and Smith had apparently about as much chance of winning as did Don Quixote when he essayed his famous stilt with the windmill. While they did not go into their contests with the same degree of confidence as did the erratic old knight, the results were just as disastrous.
    The program of having the boys toss for order of battle in the ring was not carried out. Haley, however, was the first victim. Referee Siler was accorded a welcome that made the rafters ring. Haley was accorded a fair amount of applause. He was accompanied by Martin Judge, Abe Pollock, and " Kid " McGlynn. McGovern came a few seconds later, and secured the usual storm of applause that is showered on champions. In his corner were Sam Harris, his manager, Matty Matthews , and Al Herford , manager of Joe Gans.
    No time was wasted in getting instruction s fro m Siler, and as soon as the gong sounded McGovern began operations. He rushed at Haley, and before the latter had time to do any clever work whipped in a few of his famous trip-hammer body punches.
    Haley evidently had planned to fight back. They fiddled a minute, and he shot a stiff jab into McGovern's nose. They clinched and fought for the body. Haley partly slipped to the floor, and was down five seconds. Fiddling fast with both hands, McGovern lost no tim e i n resumin g his attack . They came to a clinch, and Haley was kept busy looking after his ribs and stomach. After the break McGovern swung a vicious right, which glanced from his opponent's head. McGovern twice swung his right without connecting. Haley fought back pluckily, but it proved his downfall. In the mixup McGovern swung his left to the point of the jaw, and Haley fell in a heap and was counted out.
    McGovern Gets a Kiss
    McGovern went to his corner and was affectionately kissed by one of his supernumerary seconds. The brief encounter had lasted just a minute and forty seconds, and as the little knocker-out wended his way to his dressing-room he was cheered again and again. Haley, it is reported, had trained none too faithfully for the contest. Succeeding this bout came the Forbes-Ryan encounter with its abrupt ending.
    McGovern was given time to rest, and then came in for the final bout against Billy Smith. The friends of the latter had bet that he would last three rounds and he tried his best to win the money on this proposition. If the track had bee a straightaway he might have had a chance. Although making a runaway fight the sympathies of the crowd were with him, for the spectators knew just what he was up against. In the two and one-third rounds he lasted he was on the floor about twenty times.
    At the sound of the gong Smith began to pireuette round the ring, with all the grace of a dancing master. His track had more laps to the mile than McGovern's, who went nimbly around after the fast-moving Philadelphian. McGovern suddenly stopped and smiled. He got Smith in a corner. Realizing he was in danger the latter ducked low and sprinted to the other side of the stage. McGovern swung his right at the moving target and landed a light blow on the back. Smith came in with a rushing left lead for the head and they clinched. McGovern at once began preparations for a tattoo on his opponent's ribs. Smith wrestled and went to the floor, taking the limit. Smith again landed a light left on the face and they clinched. Smith resumed his sprinting tactics and McGovern, after following him for a few seconds, again came to a standstill and smiled. Smith went in with a rushing left, clinched, and went to the floor for nine seconds. While down he leisurely brushed the resin from his gloves. McGovern did not like the style of the contest and began earnedt efforts to corner Smith. He whipped a hard right uppercutt to the body, but Smith was receding and It did no great damage. Smith went down twice for a number of seconds and then the bell rang. The sound, which must have been welcome to the Philadelphian, seemed doubly so to the crowd. At last a man had been found to stand up before the Brooklyn cyclone for three minutes and a great cheer filled the building.
    Cheer Smith's Running.
    The second round was much of the same character, with the exception that Smith went down ten times. Three times McGovern went over with him, but he wa s always up in an instant, while Smith took the rest cure as long as the rules woul d permit . McGovern was by far the stronger of the two and once tried to hold Smith up and punch him. Once he tried to assist Smith to his feet, but the Quaker City lad did not want to resume operations so quickly. Smith tried a few left leads after a clinch, but none appeared to land solidly. Nearing the finish of the roun McGovern pounded his rlgrft on Smith's kidneys. Once more the gong ran and the cheers of the crowd were louder than ever. Under ordinary conditions Smith would have received as much hissing as he received applause, but his elusive Aguinaldo tactics were highly appreciated.
    In the third round Smith swung his right over McGovern's head. McGovern went fiercely after him and they fought to a clinch on the ropes. A few more sprints and two or three little mix-ups ended by Smith going to the floor for six seconds. The exact blow could not be seen and It looked as though he had been wrestled down. He was not as lively as usual when he arose and McGovern, forcing the pace, whiiped in one or two swings. The last was in the nature of an uppercut, which landed on Smith's chin and sent him out for keeps.
    In the preliminary bout Jack Nelson stopped Pete Boyle in one round. Sig Hart was given the decision over Dave O'Connor after six rounds. Clarence Forbes knocked out Tim Ryan, a novice, In the first round.
    Sig. Hart and Dave O'Connor met at catch weights, the former conceding about ten pounds. At the conclusion of the bout Referee Beaton , who decided in favor of Hart, was the recipient of a demonstration which lasted fully forty minutes.
     
  6. BitPlayerVesti

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    Vs Eddie Sprague
    Waterbury evening Democrat. [volume], December 01, 1899, Image 7
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    The daily morning journal and courier., December 01, 1899, Image 1
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    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    Skipping some minor bouts which were hard to find reports on.

    Vs Harry Forbes
    The sun., December 23, 1899, Page 5, Image 5
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    The Brooklyn Daily Eagle., December 23, 1899, Page 13, Image 13
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    Vs George Dixon
    The sun., January 10, 1900, Page 1, Image 1
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    The sun., January 10, 1900, Page 2, Image 2
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    The Brooklyn Daily Eagle., January 10, 1900, Page 14, Image 14
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    THE NATIONAL POLICE GAZETTE: NEW YORK. Saturday January 27, 1900
    M'GOVERN DEFEATS DIXON AND BECOMES THE UNDISPUTED FEATHERWEIGHT CHAMPION
    Colored Lad Made a Clever Showing at the Outset and Looked to he a Sure Winner,
    SECONDS THREW UP THE SPONGE WHEN HE WENT DOWN.
    George Dixon's courage was tbe most impressive feature of tbe great fight with "Terry" McGovern. He met his Waterloo at the hands of the Intrepid little Brooklynlte, but went to defeat with a smile on bis face and a disposition to be aggressive, but nature refused to supply him with energy enough to continue the uneven struggle, and wben tbe sponge was thrown into the ring, in acknowledgment of his defeat, the humane act was applauded by those who wanted to see him spared the Ignominy of a knock-out. For elgbt rounds he bad battled fast, furiously and courageously. In the earlier rounds he was the aggressor, and for a long while it looked as if he had regained hla old-time champlonship form and would win over his youthful, hard-hitting, brave opponent. So favorably did his movements In the ring impress the spectators that the betting, which before the battle was 2 to 1 In favor of McGovern, shifted completely around and Dixon money offered at odds from all parts of the arena found no takers. Dixon was distinguishing himself In the manner which gained hlm ths title of champion and enabled him to hold it longer than any other fistic premier, not excepting John L. Sullivan. It looked for quite a while as If the little colored hero would add the scalp of another aspirant to his title to the many which he has accumulated during the twelve years of his incumbency. The white fellow was making a pitiful showing against his dusky rival, the lad who had been hero of a hundred battles, and not only never had been knocked out, but never had been knocked down In a regulation ring fight. At long range McGovern was powerless to cope with him. In the clinches, which were numerous, the Brooklyn flghlar worked both hands on the body freely, but these blows at short range did not seem to be effective. Everything was coming Dixon's way. Time and again he poked McGovern's head back with his left. He seemed to be, and he was, fighting as well as he ever fought, and it looked, barring accident, that he would win galloping. If Dixon could have kept up the pace there is no doubt that he would have won, and won within the limit of twenty-five rounds. But he fought himself out In the first few rounds, and he never had a chance lo recuperate his strength. The opening of the fourth found a change, and thereafter Dixon's star began to fade and continued to fade until the close of the eighth round, when it was eclipsed. Dixon went to the ring floor eight times in this round. Not once was he knocked down clean, going down usually from weakness, while at close range.
    The fight was held in the Broadway Athletic Club on January 9, and attracted a crowd that was only limited by the capacity of the clubhouse. Every nook and corner and cranny had Its occupaut. Every aisle and passageway was thronged. Never before liad the quaint old building been so crowded.
    It was by all odds the heaviest betting fight that has taken place In years, at the ringside the money was handled about in thousand dollar bunches by McGovem's adherents. In some Instances the McGovernltes offered odds of 2 to 1 without finding takers. Any number of men, however, were willing to bet even money that Dixon would stay ten rounds, and thousands of dollars were staked on this proposition.
    After a lively preliminary, Dixon, accompanied by "Tom" O'Roorke, his manager, "Bob'' Armstrong and "Charlie'' Miner, entered the ring. Two minutes later McGovern, with an Irish flag knotted about his neck, bounded through the ropes, and, walking quickly across the ring to Dixon's corner, shook hands with the colored boy. "Sam" Harris, "Terry" Lee and "Charlie" Mayhood acted as his seconds. Colonel Paddeu held the watch for him, and "Mike" Slattery or Providence performed a similar office for Dixon
    Both fighters were received enthusiastically by the crowd and neither lost any time In preparing for the contest. Then Master of Ceremonies "Joe" Humphries introduced Referee "Johnny" White, who called Dixon and McGovern to the centre for instructions, and the battle began.

    Fight by Rounds.
    Round 1 —McGovern rushed Dixon and landed a right swing. Dixon was after him like a deer. A clinch followed, and McGovern's arms swung like a windmill In wicked infighting. Dixon, strong as a young steer, broke away and delivered two uppercutts. His arm caught around McGovern's neck like the coll of an anaconda. McGovern's right beat a drumbeat on the colored boy's back. Dixon was never cooler. He caught McGovern two swift left swings straight on the nose by way of reminding the Brooklynlte that his day was not done.
    Round 2— The swiftest fighting everseen began again at the gong sound. Dixon was the cooler of the two. He missed a left swing, and in a clinch McGovern continued his tattoo with left and right short arm blows on Dixon's breast and stomach. Dixon landed two left swings, and McGovern gave him a wicked hinge In the stomach. Dixon, in return, forced the Brooklyn boy to tiie ropes in his corner. They fanned each other till Dixon got a swing home on McGovern's solar. Dixon's eye began going. McGovern closed the round hugging the colored whirlwind.
    Bound 3—Both men were cautious. In return for some short punches in a clinch, Dixon lauded a telling left on McGovern. Both men fought in a clinch. Dixon learned to spring away out of reach. A left swmg canght McGovern on the neck, but It did not effect him moch. Dixon had the best of the fighting, and, taking advantage of a lull, staggered McGovern with a left and right swing which sent the Brooklyn boy's head back between his shoulder blades. McGovern landed two pouches at the gong.
    Round 4—Dixon was the favorite In the betting. Some short fiddling. McGovern clinched at each exchange, Dixon gave him the shoulder. Straightening up he gave McGovern a rib cracker with the right. McGovern answered with a volley that forced Dixon to the ropes. Referee White cautioned both men about striking in cllnches. McGovern followed a right with a wicked left, and Dixon staggered. Dixon rallied quickly and cracked McGovern's head with both hands The blown would have put any ordinary fighter out, McGovern had the best of the round.
    Round 5—McGovern rained body blows on Dixon's solar plexus. The colored lad returned the fire, aiming for the face. Roth men granted. Dixon uppercut tbe white fighter, and, hooking him wlith a left around tbe neck, put him to the floor. He was up in a jlffy Dixon swung a left thst sounded out to the car tracks. The body blows forced the blood from Dixon's mouth. He rushed McGovern, but gained no advantage. Dlxon stabbed McGovern In the chest with a left. At the gong Dixon had it his own way.
    Round 6 - McGovern recuperated from his punishment in the last round. McGovern's left blocked Dixon when they clinched and he pummelled Dixon as if he was flaying wheat. Dixon sent a cracking left lo McGovern's Jaw. A dosen clinches and as many swings of McGovern's short arm blows followed. The left arm punches in Dixon's stomach begun to tell. McGovern ducked a swing as the gong bounded. McGovern's round.
    Rouud 7—A clinch with the gong, Dixon mised iwo swings with the left, landed one, and McGovern punched him in the winrd. They hugged each other for ten seconds. McGovern landed two lefts on Dixon's jaw. The blows were too swift for the eye to follow, separating for a moment, Dixon jabbed McGovern's head back with his left Dixon hugged McGovern and the latter, breaking both hands away, rained right and left on the stomach and breast to the gong.
    Round 8— Both men were jaded, Dixon's lip and eye bleedlng as they came to the front. In a rush and a whirlwind Dixon slipped to his knees at ibe north ropes, McGovern helped him up. Another McGovern onslaught and Dixon went to the floor in McGovern's corner. He rose groggy. They fought back to Dixon's corner, and with lightning blows McGovern knocked Dixon under the ropes thrice in quick succession in the southwest corner. It was a brave dying. The colored boy's face was streaming blood. Again he staggered across the ring and went down hard in McGovern's corner. One more fall, a last appealing look from Dixon, and the latter's manager, merciful In his colored boy's behalf, threw up the sponge.
     
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    Vs Ward
    The sun., January 30, 1900, Page 4, Image 4
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    Evening star. [volume], January 30, 1900, Page 9, Image 9
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    Akron daily Democrat., January 30, 1900, Page 5, Image 5
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    Eddie Santry Vs Ben Jordan
    The sun., October 11, 1899, Page 8, Image 8
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    Vs Santry
    Weekly Pantagraph, Volume 54, Number 5, 2 February 1900
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    The Rock Island Argus, Volume 48, Number 90, 2 February 1900
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  12. BitPlayerVesti

    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    This is long and the OCR is poor, so it'll take a while to get the full text posted.

    THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBUARY 2, 1900.

    M'GOVERN WINS FROM SANTRY
    Secures Victory Over the Chicago Man, Knocking Him Out in Fifth Round.
    BLOW ON JAW DOES IT.
    Local Fighter Unable to Withstand the Punching of the Brooklyn Champion.
    DENFASS BEATS BILLY STIFT
     
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  13. Senya13

    Senya13 Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    It was 1900-02-02 The Chicago Daily Tribune (page 4), not February 3, 1900.
     
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  14. Senya13

    Senya13 Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    If anybody is heavily into McGovern, his earliest known bouts were in Active A.C. amateur tournament in January 1897, he fought at 115 pounds. On Jan 21 he had a 4-round draw (one extra round) vs Nick Wilton, and on Jan 23 he beat Jack Lacy in 1 round and William Downey in 4 rounds (1 extra round), winning the tournament. His name was given as Tom McGarvey of Jackson A.C. or Dan McCarthy of Brooklyn in the newspapers.
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    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    There's also a statement from George Siler and preliminary bouts which I haven't got the text for yet.
    THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBUARY 2, 1900.
    M'GOVERN WINS FROM SANTRY
    Secures Victory Over the Chicago Man, Knocking Him Out in Fifth Round.
    BLOW ON JAW DOES IT.
    Local Fighter Unable to Withstand the Punching of the Brooklyn Champion.
    DENFASS BEATS BILLY STIFT


    It took Terence McGovern of Brooklyn four and a half rounds to solve the defense of Eddy Santry, the Chicago featherweight, in last night’s battle at Tattersall’s. Then Santry failed to get up at the count of ten, following a knockdown, and the Brooklyn lad was declared the winner, although Santry, who had staggered to his feet just a moment too late, did his best to protest against the decision.

    In the hubbub the crowd could not tell whether Slier had counted Santry out or had stopped the fight to prevent further punishment. Santry was resting on one knee at the count of ten and was clearly counted out. Ho was dazed and did not recover his full senses for several minutes.

    The knockout came in the fifth round, after a fierce mix-up. in which Santry did some clever work, although he was fast growing weak. McGovern would not be denied and straightening Santry up with a short arm jolt to the stomach, landed right and left on the Jaw In quick succession and Santry fell to the floor on his face. He got up just after the count of ten, but was In a weakened condition.

    McGovern's showing was a revelation to the crowd. In his previous contests in this city he has never received any punishment. Last night be gave an exhibition of aggressiveness that astonished every one. Going against a man who Is admitted to be a fairly good puncher, he Just waded In and took all that Santry could send without aa much as blinking. Time and again he went In without guard and let Santry land on him. None of the blows seemed to stagger him In the slightest, and, except that be seemed a trifle tired once or twice from the hard work, there was no evidence of the hard-battle he was engaged in.

    Sentry's clever defense work was at a discount in that McGovern made him fight in Just his own style. There was no individual leading with a chance for a hard counter from a distance,-a mode of fighting at which Santry is an adept McGovern kept coming. If Santry moved back the Brooklyn man moved up to within range, and then it was a case of blow for blow. Under these conditions it resolved itself Into a content as to who could bit the harder, and those who saw Sentry standing manfully to.this toe-to-toe style of battling felt sure that there could be but one ending, and, they were right in their ideas. Santry could perhaps, have done much more foot work than he did. but for a man claiming the featherweight championship such tactics would probably have found, disfavor with the crowds and, though his Judgment may be questioned by some, he won golden opinions by his gritty and determined battle against the best man of his weight the world has ever seen.

    Big Crowd Sees the Battle.

    The contest was witnessed by the largest crowd that ever saw a pugilistic encounter in Chicago, the big building at Sixteenth and Dearborn streets being filled.

    There were between 8,000 and 9,000 people hi the building. Hundreds of them were from points outside of Chicago, for the contest was regarded as having quite a bearing on the 122-pound championship, even though only a six-round affair, Santry's victory over Ben Jordan, the English champion featherweight, helped to give this meeting added significance. McGovern, however, was a decided favorite in the betting,, nearly all the wages being on the proposition that Santry would or would not last the six 'ounds. During yesterday considerable money made its appearance on the Santry end so much of it that it led to gossip, and the backers of McGovern's ability to finish the contest inside the limit accordingly felt uneasy when at the ringside the announcement was made there would be no decision In case both men were on their feet.

    The Stit-Denfass match, which Immediately preceded the encounter between the two little stars, seemed to please the big crowd greatly. although It signified the humiliation of the local man by a fighter who a few months ago was comparatively unheard of.

    Then there was quite a wait before Santry and McGovern appeared and enough speechmaking after they did show themselves to do for a ward convention. There was a continual protest from spectators in the north end of the building against the action of those in front of them who were standing and cutting off the view. So thick was tobacco smoke that those whose view was otherwise unobstructed felt at a disadvantage.

    Santry was the first to appear in the ring, taking the southeast corner. His seconds the veteran Harry Gil more and Jack Moffat. The crowd gave Santry comparatively sparing applause. When McGovern appeared a few seconds later the noise was a little more emphatic and it pleased the Brooklyn boy, whose face brightened quickly as he bowed in acknowledgment. Then the little prize ring etiquette of “saluting your partner" occurred to McGovern. and, turning, he hurried across the ring and grasped the hand of Santry, who had advanced a little way to meet him. Had MeGovern's face been, photographed at this moment It might he used to advantage by those who argue that prize fighting is not brutal. The 'tittle fighter's' face was absolutely radiant with cordiality; McGovern's seconds were his manager, Sam Harris, and Henry Mayrood.