Joseph Terrence "Terry" McGovern the Terrible, some fight reports

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  1. BitPlayerVesti

    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    Manager Harris leaned over and informed the newspaper men that McGovern bad a badly Injured thumb, the result of a boxing bout in Philadelphia.

    After considerable talk It was announced that McGovern wanted to battle under straight Marquis of Queensberry rules; that Santry had insisted' on a "clean break." and that they had finally compromised on battling under straight Queensberry rules, with the provision that the decision should be a draw in case both men were on their at the end of the six rounds. This decision displeased a great part of the crowd, which showed It by hissing.

    McGovern's Interrogation Point.

    Finally all preliminaries were settled and the gong sounded the start of battle. As the men faced each other It was seen Santry had an advantage in height, which was emphasised by his fighting attitude, standing almost straight, while his adversary crouched and bent his head down until his chin nearly touched his breast. In fact the Brooklyn man's upper body formed a sort of interrogation point—one that fighters of all sorts have found It hard to answer.

    For a few moments at the start of the battle there were murmurs of discontent. The boys were engaged in a weird exhibition of feinting, each making his arms move like piston rode. Then, when they got closer and began to land, blows McGovern's attitude was so peculiar that many thought he was not "trying." He paid no attention whatever to Santry's head, but kept landing swift short little punches on the body that, to the uninitiated, seemed harmless. "Fake!" “fake!" was the shout, but the boys paid no attention to it, They bad other matters on hand. They gradually warmed to their work; the elbows drew back further, the big gloves shot In with a whack, the clinching began. Then of a sudden Santry tottered and fell, the result apparently of a long, swinging blow that just managed to reach the jaw. This was greeted with a joyous shout and the malcontents were silenced. From this on there was no letup until the end of the round, and still another knockdown came during a mixup near the ropes, so that when the bell finally rang for the end of the first round all thoughts of a possible hippodrome were dissipated, and as the men walked to their corners the great throng broke into a whirr of excited comment that resounded through the building until it suggested the notes of a Niagara or the uproar that is made by the machinery of a giant electric plant.

    Fight by Rounds

    FIRST ROUND—Santry was the first to enter the ring, climbing through the ropes at 10:20 o'clock. He was given a rousing cheer, but McGovern, who followed two minutes later, was compelled to bow in response to the shouts that greeted him. When McGovern and Santry bad divested themselves of their sweaters and trousers it was seen the Brooklynite wore white trunks, surmounted by a green belt, decorated with shamrocks. Santry was attired in tight-fitting flesh colored trunks, topped off by a belt of plain green. At the sound of the gong both began to fiddle fast, and Santry showed signs of being a trifle at sea, as he left two good openings which McGovern did not utilize. McGovern was the first to land, jolting his right to the wind. McGovern kept coming, and sent both right and left to the body. Santry's nervousness soon wore off, and the next essay by McGovern led to a hot mixup which put the crowd on tiptoe. Santry sent a straight left to the face and came to a clinch. McGovern, whose attack seemed to be for the body, sent a left to the wind< and followed with another in the same place. Santry countered well on the body. McGovern hooked his left to the jaw, and Santry went down, but was up again at the count of four. McGovern forced the pace after this, and Santry had none the worse of the rapid exchange. In a clinch Santry was wrestled to his knees. They came together and mixed matters hard. Santry got in a stiff left on the stomach. Once again they Indulged in a fast exchange of hooks, and Santry was forced to bis knee again. The bell rang as soon as he went down.

    SECOND ROUND-This opened with some clever blocking on Santry's part, followed by a clinch. McGovern kept his ever-busy fiats playing on the ribs and stomach, and occasionally by uppercutting his left to the chin. He did not use his right as hard as usual, seeming anxious to save his damaged thumb. Santry, meanwhile, was not idle, and was sending just as many as be received. Santry sent a right to the body. and then they mixed hard. Both swung rights on the Jaw, and the crowd wondered why one of them did not drop. Santry jabbed a stiff left to the nose, but McGovern did not seem to mind it. McGovern then, for a few seconds, seemed to just hold his head out tor Santry to punch at. This the local man did, and then followed another brisk mixup. It seemed impossible that both could go the pace. McGovern hooked a left to the head and followed with another to the ear. Following a clinch McGovern uppercut his right to the wind. They stowed down somewhat until the gong sounded.

    THIRD ROUND—Santry opened well, scoring s stiff left on his opponent’s nose. He cleverly blocked a vicious left swing, and when McGovern tried to rush him stood and fought him hard until both were glad to rest for an instant. Santry hooked his right to the head, but McGovern came back with one fully as good on the same spot. McGovern made good use of his uppercuts in the clinches, and in this respect outfought Santry. Another small fistic storm ended by Santry going to the floor, though it was hard to tell just what blow felled him. He was not groggy, but wisely took a nine count. Santry drove his right hard and straight, and McGovern was forced back by the impact. The rest of the round was made up of mixups and short range fighting. Santry was forced against the south ropes, but rallied gamely and fought himself clear. McGovern smiled at the end of the round.

    FOURTH ROUND—After the first exchange both men slowed down and indulged in a little sparring for wind. For the first minute the work was light, and a few hisses were heard. Whether these had any effect on McGovern he swung his right to the jaw for a clean knock down, and the few puny hisses were drowned in a roar of applause. Santry fell hard, but after taking a count of nine, got up in good shape. The fact that he did so after getting such a hard blow again caused some hisses. Again McGovern sent his right to the Jaw and once again Santry took the count.

    FIFTH ROUND—Santry made a game fight in the opening stages of the fifth round, and though he sent home many punches none was strong enough to stop the irrepressible McGovern. Nearing the middle of the round the work grew fiercer. Santry was forced back, but would not break ground. McGovern hooked his left to the jaw and followed with a right an instant later. Santry went down for eight seconds amid great uproar. He was by no means finished when be arose, McGovern kept coming, and finally a right on the jaw, followed by a left uppercut on the chin, sent Santry to the mat hard. Siler tolled off the seconds and Santry was still resting on his knee at the count of ten. He looked as though he would like to continue, but was dazed and when taken to his, corner took some time to recover.

    Frank Kennedy was official timekeeper.

    Talks with the Principals.

    McGovern said after the content: "The battle was not as hard aa my contest with Dixon. After the first two rounds I realised that I had my man beaten, and it was only a matter of a few rounds. Santry landed on me a number of times, but with one exception the blows did not bother me. He caught me one heart blow that hurt considerably, but apart from that I was not worried at any stage. Sam Harris my manager, had considerable money bet that Santry would not last the limit and I had to win it for him If I could.”

    Santry said he found McGovern a harder hitter and a much stronger man than he expected. He did not wish to make any excuses, but said he was not feeling as well as usual. “I did not feel strong when I went into the ring,” he declared.

    Late last night it was said McGovern had agreed to meet Santry in another bout in a short time.
     
  2. BitPlayerVesti

    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBUARY 2, 1900.
    STATEMENT BY REFEREE SILER

    Santry was beaten, but not disgraced. He put up a game fight—in fact, fought Terry at his own game and mixed on every occasion, l doubt, however, whether he could have fought otherwise, for the simple reason that McGovern. unless a man runs away, forces him to fight his own style. McGovern is all that I have said about him.

    In an article in THE SUNDAY TRIBUNE, a short time ago I went into details and illustrated his style of fighting as compared with others. I said then that McGovern’s style would undoubtedly revolutionize the boxing world, as Sullivan's did some twenty years ago.

    Santry did not do quite as well as I expected, because I thought he would stay the limit. I thought his cleverness and defensive work would probably effect McGovern’s aggressiveness, but in this I erred. McGovern’s style of fighting is on the close range order— in fact, too close to permit a defensive fighter to show his real worth. I have stated repeatedly in numerous articles that a long-range fighter must invariably get set and step in to deliver a forcible blow. A man of that kind, who is compelled to fight at short range, is all abroad, so to speak. McGovern’s straight, short-arm punches, his quick right and left hand uppercuts to the jaw, and his short jolts to the same spot, did this work. While as I said before. Eddy put a game fight, McGovern’s style simply upset him. I think Eddy made a mistake when he fought McGovern’s own style, but I doubt whether he could have avoided it, as Terry, with head down, body and jaws protected, kept too close to give any opportunity to step in and straighten out his arm when he hit. After the second round I expected Terry to finish him in the third: after the third, I surely thought the fourth would see the end. I must confess I was surprised to see Eddy go to the end of that round. In the fifth I figured the end must come. Eddy was getting weak and had no steam to his blows. He had opportunity after opportunity to hit Terry in the face, which he did, but the little terror simply bored in and said, “Give them to me as long as I get a chance to give them to you.”

    To sum the whole fight up, I simply figure that McGovern is a wonder. I do ot know where they can get a man to beat him. I always thought, and still think , Santry is one of the best men in his class at his style of fighting, but he or anybody else, be he never so clever at long range work, will be all abroad when he gets to close fighting.

    I was really sorry to see Santry go out, because even hough decisively beaten, had he staid the limit the opportunity for a big purse for a twenty-round fight with McGovern was good. This meant a lot of money to Santry. I am afraid, now, the New York clubs will turn him down, as far as McGovern is concerned.

    Quite a few arguments arose after the fight had ended as to whether I stopped the contest or counted Santry out. A number of people thought I stopped It, considering that Santry had no chance. This I did not. I counted ten before Santry got his knee from the ground and virtually counted out. All bets on knockouts and all bets on the decision that McGovern would win must be decided accordingly: It has always been an argument among the followers of pugilism that the referee, under exciting circumstances. or during a hot fight cannot possibly accurately count ten. There were three watches held on me tonight and when Santry was floored two minutes of the fifth round had expired. I began counting, and just as I had counted exactly ten seconds, according to the stop watches.

    Santry, although beaten, I am satisfied in mv own mind can defeat more fighters than can defeat more fighters than can defeat him. I still believe, figuring from a scientific standpoint, he is one of the best In America. With McGovern, I can simply say, be does not class.
     
  3. BitPlayerVesti

    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBUARY 2, 1900.
    GOOD PRELIMINARY BOUTS.

    Stift Loses the Decision to Ed Denfass of Philadelphia—"Tipton Slasher' Knocks Out Burke.

    With commendable promptness Fred Neal and Young Keasmer entered the ring precisely at 8:30 o'clock. Announcer Millar s voice was drowned by the chorus of voices and the shuffling of feet of the Incoming crowd. The boys met at 120 pounds, Neal being shorter and sturdier than his opponent He showed good skill in blocking in the opening round, and sent home a hard left to the stomach and a right swing to the jaw that shook Keasmer up. Keasmer Jabbed two or three times, but his blows lacked force.

    Keasmer jabbed persistently to the second round, cutting Neal's left eye. Neal did not get home any hard blows and had the worst of the round.

    Neal opened up well In the third round, landing a hard left swing on the jaw, and following with a right on the ear. Keasmer kept up his Jabbing, but was not so effective as in the second round. The first good mixup took place in the opening part of the fourth round, but neither seemed anxious to rough it.

    Neal was short in his attack in the fifth and did not stop his opponent's Jabs as well as before. Keasmer tired In the last, and Neal, who was the aggressor most of the time, sent home enough swings to win him the decision.

    Jack Daly of Chicago and Jack Deen, the second pair, met at 185 pounds. Deen did not look like a fighter, but made merry while he lasted. He went at Daly with an attack as variegated as the Incidents in a Kentucky election. He rushed into a clinch and made vigorous but Ineffective efforts to connect with Daly's anatomy. The latter smiled serenely, but. as the work continued, realized that he had to do some fighting. He went after Deen hard and floored him with a right on Jaw. Deen took the count. He was floored four more times, and his seconds then climbed into the ring. The round lasted two minutes and twenty seconds.

    Jim Driscoll, the man with the fighting face, met Sam Sandberg at 152 pounds. They furnished the comedy bout of the night, keeping the crowd in roars of laughter. Sandberg was in flabby condition, but excelled as a sprinter. Driscoll, who never, won honors on the cinder path, could not catch him. He followed his man around the ring, and about the middle of the first round caught up with him and felled him under the ropes with a left hook on the chin. He took the count and the chase was resumed.

    Sandberg scarcely struck a blow in the second, leading his left weakly Into space. Driscoll caught him near the end of the second round and again floored him with a jolt on the jaw. Sandberg, though not out, staid down until the count of ten by Referee Bardoll.

    Alexander Burke of Milwaukee and Benny Yanger, the " Tipton Slasher." met at 115 pounds. Burke had an advantage in height, but crouched. Yanger had all the better of the opening round. His short Jolts on the body soon took the steam out of the Cream City fighter.

    Burke swung his right wildly, but was generally short. In the clinches Yanger did plenty of execution and Burke was tired at the finish. Burke did better in the first part of the second round, but, though gritty, could not stand the pace set by Yanger, who punished him hard on the face and body. The Chicagoan forced the pace in the third, and paved the way to victory with a straight right on the jaw. This he followed up with a fusillade of punches, finally knocking out his man with a right swing on the jaw after one minute and twenty seconds of fighting. Burke was cheered.

    Clever left-hand jabbing and fast foot work won the decision for Ed Denfass of Philadelphia over Billy Stift of Chicago at the end of six rounds of the semi-final wind up. Stift was outclassed from the start, and was unable to reach the Philadelphian with any of his swings.

    Stift was cleanly knocked down on three occasions and fell over as many times more in his efforts to get at Denfass. Stift started in to force the pace, but found Denfass all there and was cleverly blocked. Denfass ducked the next rush and Stift fell hard to the canvas. Near the end of the round Denfass caught Stift slightly off his balance and shot a straight right to the jaw, sending the local man down for four seconds. Denfass scored another knockdown in the second with a right swing to the head. Denfass had the better of the fighting both at long and short range. In the clinches he repeatedly pounded Stift hard in the region of the kidneys. Denfass swung a left to the face in the fourth round and sent Stift to the mat for the third time. Denfass won all the way and even Stift smiled once or twice at his futile efforts to land. He landed scarcely one damaging punch in the entire six rounds. Malachy Hogan was referee.
     
  4. BitPlayerVesti

    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    Vs Oscar Gardner
    The evening world., March 10, 1900, Page 6, Image 6
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    The sun., March 10, 1900, Page 5, Image 5
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    The Brooklyn Daily Eagle., March 10, 1900, Page 15, Image 15
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    New-York tribune., March 10, 1900, Page 6, Image 6
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  5. BitPlayerVesti

    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    The Evening World mentions McGovern grabbing Gardner's leg for 6 seconds, others mention him grabbing his leg as well, but I'm yet to find any that say he had a 16 second long count as mentioned on boxrec or any controversy in the next day reports.

    Edit: The Brooklyn Citizen mentions grabbing the legs being a foul, but not a long count, it also comments that if the rules were properly enforced few fights would make it passed a few rounds.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019
  6. BitPlayerVesti

    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    Vs Eddie Lenny
    (This is basically the report in the Philadelphia Inquirer)
    Waterbury evening Democrat. [volume], March 16, 1900, Image 7
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  7. BitPlayerVesti

    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    ND with Tommy White
    The Brooklyn Daily Eagle., April 18, 1900, Page 16, Image 16
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    I think the Chicago Tribune gave it to McGovern, saying "it is doubtfull if his work in [the last round] would have entitled him to an even break."
    The Inter Ocean said "there wasn't much to choose between the pair when the final bell rang"
     
  8. BitPlayerVesti

    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    Vs Tommy Warren
    The sun., April 21, 1900, Page 4, Image 4
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    The Brooklyn Daily Eagle., April 21, 1900, Page 13, Image 13
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    Vs McCloskey
    The Brooklyn Daily Eagle., May 22, 1900, Page 16, Image 16
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    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019
  9. BitPlayerVesti

    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    Vs Tommy White
    The Brooklyn Daily Eagle., June 13, 1900, Page 16, Image 16
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    The evening world., June 13, 1900, Page 8, Image 8
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    The sun., June 13, 1900, Page 4, Image 4
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  10. BitPlayerVesti

    BitPlayerVesti The Ad Wolgast of Googling Stuff Full Member

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    I'm not going to include the preliminaries (which are at the end of the article). It's mentions Larry Temple as Dixon's trainer.

    Vs Dixon
    The Chicago Tribune - 24 June 1900 page 18
    HE FAILS TO STOP DIXON
    M'GOVERN GAINS DECISION OVER "LITTLE CHOCOLATE."
    Famous Little Champion Tries Hard to Score a Knockout Blow, but the Colored Fighter Manages to Last Through the Six Rounds—Crowd Is Not Lare. the Derby Seeming to Hurt Rather than Help Attendance—Several Preliminaries.
    [BY GEORGE SILER.]
    Terry McGovern met George Dixon for the second time in his fighting career at Tattersall's last night, and, although he failed to put the old-time champion away he easilly earned the decision rendered to him by Malachy Hogan . The contest was fast and furious for three rounds, after which "Terry's" terrific body blows began to tell and George, to stay the limit, held on for dear life at every opportunity .

    The attendance was not up to expectations . The card was a good one. McGovern is a Chicago favorite and has always boxed to big houses. Dixon is also a local favorite, and with two such good little men in the wlndup the management expected a packed house . But it was Derby day and of course Derby night. Those who went to Washington Park to see Lieutenant Gibson or some other horse capture the big prize had winessed enough sport for one day apparantly and staid away. It was horse day and horse night and the sports wanted to talk horse and not fight.

    The "Brooklyn Terror" was not in first-class condition and carried a few pounds too much for speed. Dixon, on the other hand looked fit, and the fact that he wtthstood "Terry' s" fusillade of body blows showed he must havs been in pretty good shape.

    McGovern did not cut loose in his usual fast style in the first round and began business with long range boxing. Dixon saw the first opening and let fly his famous left hook, which McGove n blocked beautifully, This set the ball a-rolling, and "Terry" getting in close, began his favorite style of boring in at the body. During one of the mixups "Terry" hit a bit low and commltted the same offense a moment later. Luckily no damage was done George showed up well toward the latter part of the round and he was cheered to the echo.

    Fast Work in the Second

    Terry began work in earnest in the second round. As soon as the men met in the center of the ring he started away with left and right at body and head. George stood his ground manfully and caught McGovern several good left-hand face blows. They were not hard enough, though, to stop Terry's progress. He set sail for George's body and soon had the ex-champion breaking ground. McGovern kept after him and getting him near the ropes went in head down to do business. Dixon measured him nicely, however, and shot his left over on his jaw, following It a moment later with a stiff right. This nettled the "Brooklyn wonder," and to even up matter she rushed George to the ropes. The latter was going strong about this time and planted left and right again. This brought them to a clinch and Terry was pegging away at Dixon's body with both hands when the gong sounded.

    The third round was warm, and Dixon, If anything, showed to the better advantage. "Terry" opened affairs by sending left and right to the body. Then George came back with several good lefts and rights, forcing McGovern to break ground. This brought down the house. "Terry's" Irish got up about this time and he began roughing it, wrestling Dixon to the floor. The crowd, which was now with Dixon, hooted "Terry's" tactics, but that did not stop him. In and on he went as though the big end ef the purse depended upon his knocking George out in that round. The fast and rough work tired Dixon and before the end of the round he began hedging, but at that he would occasionally slip in a few hard ones.

    In the fourth round Dixon tired, and during the remainder of the contest he held on in every clinch. "Terry," it appeared, was overanxious to knock him out, and thereby missed a number of good opportunities to land a knockout. Once he caught Dixon flush on the jaw with the right, but George was breaking away at the time, but for which he might have gone down for the count. "Terry," however, did not go for Dixon's headpiece as often as was expected, but seemed to be content with slamming in hot shot on the body and kidneys. Some of his ribroasters were hard enough to stop any little fellow, and Dixon could really not be blamed for holding when the opportunity presented Itself. The fifth and sixth rounds were all "Terry's." Dixon, however, was determined to stay the limit, and did so by fighting on the defensive, breaking ground, and holding. He received severe punishment, and despite his methods in the final rounds was liberally applauded for being there at the end.

    Before the fight Edward McCloskey, who staid six rounds with McGovern at Philadelphia a short time ago, challenged ths winner.
     
  11. Senya13

    Senya13 Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    1900-06-24 The Chicago Daily Tribune (Chicago, IL) (page 18)
    HE FAILS TO STOP DIXON.
    --------
    M'GOVERN GAINS DECISION OVER "LITTLE CHOCOLATE."
    --------
    Famous Little Champion Tries Hard to Score a Knockout Blow, but the Colored Fighter Manages to Last Through the Six Rounds--Crowd Is Not Large, the Derby Seeming to Hurt Rarther than Help the Attendance--Several Preliminaries.
    --------
    [BY GEORGE SILER.]
    "Terry" McGovern met George Dixon for the second time in his fighting career at Tattersall's last night, and, although he failed to put the old-time champion away he easily earned the decision rendered to him by Malachy Hogan. The contest was fast and furious for three rounds, after which "Terry's" terrific body blows began to tell and George, to stay the limit, held on for dear life at every opportunity.
    The attendance was not up to expectations. The card was a good one. McGovern is a Chicago favorite and has always boxed to big houses. Dixon is also a local favorite, and with two such good little men in the windup the management expected a packed house. But it was Derby day and of course Derby night. Those who went to Washington Park to see Lieutenant Gibson or some other horse capture the big prize had witnessed enough sport for one day apparently and staid away. It was horse day and horse night and the sports wanted to talk horse and not fight.
    The "Brooklyn Terror" was not in first-class condition and carried a few pounds too much for speed. Dixon, on the other hand, looked fit, and the fact that he withstood "Terry's" fusillade of body blows showed he must have been in pretty good shape.
    McGovern did not cut loose in his usual fast style in the first round and began business with long range boxing. Dixon saw the first opening and let fly his famous left hook, which McGovern blocked beautifully. This set the ball a-rolling, and "Terry," getting in close, began his favorite style of boring in at the body. During one of the mixups "Terry" hit a bit low and committed the same offense a moment later. Luckily no damage was done. George showed up well toward the latter part of the round and he was cheered to the echo.
    Fast Work in the Second.
    Terry began work in earnest in the second round. As soon as the men met in the center of the ring he started away with left and right at body and head. George stood his ground manfully and caught McGovern several good left-hand face blows. They were not hard enough, though, to stop Terry's progress. He set sail for George's body and soon had the ex-champion breaking ground. McGovern kept after him and getting him near the ropes went in head down to do business. Dixon measured him nicely, however, and shot his left over on his jaw, following it a moment later with a stiff right. This nettled the "Brooklyn wonder," and to even up matters he rushed George to the ropes. The latter was going strong about this time and planted left and right again. This brought them to a clinch and Terry was pegging away at Dixon's body with both hands when the gong sounded.
    The third round was warm, and Dixon, if anything, showed to the better advantage. "Terry" opened affairs by sending left and right to the body. Then George came back with several good lefts and rights, forcing McGovern to break ground. This brought down the house. "Terry's" Irish got up about this time and he began roughing it, wrestling Dixon to the floor. The crowd, which was now with Dixon, hooted "Terry's" tactics, but that did not stop him. In and on he went as though the big end of the purse depended upon his knocking George out in that round. The fast and rough work tired Dixon and before the end of the round he began hedging, but at that he would occasionally slip in a few hard ones.
    In the fourth round Dixon tired, and during the remainder of the contest he held on in every clinch. "Terry," it appeared, was overanxious to knock him out, and thereby missed a number of good opportunities to land a knockout. Once he caught Dixon flush on the jaw with the right, but George was breaking away at the time, but for which he might have gone down for the count. "Terry," however, did not go for Dixon's headpiece as often as was expected, but seemed to be content with slamming in hot shot on the body and kidneys. Some of his ribroasters were hard enough to stop any little fellow, and Dixon could really not be blamed for holding when the opportunity presented itself. The fifth and sixth rounds were all "Terry's." Dixon, however, was determined to stay the limit, and did so by fighting on the defensive, breaking ground, and holding. He received severe punishment, and despite his methods in the final rounds was liberally applauded for being there at the end.
    Before the fight Edward McCloskey, who staid six rounds with McGovern at Philadelphia a short time ago, challenged the winner.
    Dixon's Trainer Wins.
    It took Lawrence Temple, George Dixon's trainer, forty seconds to put Jack Brin away in the opening bout. Temple dropped Brin three times with straight left leads, then hit him on top of the head with his right, sending him to the floor, where he remained until Referee Bardell counted him out. Brin had no chance anyhow, and he thought the easiest way out of trouble was the floor.
    Buddy Ryan and Andy Daly, McGovern's sparring partner, put up a warm argument in the second fight of the night, Ryan being declared the winner. It as hot fighting from start to finish. "Buddy" split Andy's ear with a right swing in the first round and kept pegging away at it during the remainder of the contest. The stranger put up a game battle and found Ryan's body quite frequently with both left and right, especially in clinches. It was either boy's fight at the end of the fifth round, with possible a shade in Ryan's favor.
    In the final round the latter, by right hand uppercuts and a few stiff rights on Andy's bad ear, increased his margin and earned the decision, which, however, did not meet with the approval of some of the spectators.
    The third bout was between Ole Olson and Joe Percente, They set a lively pace right from the start, with no decided advantage to either. In the third round Joe struck Ole a terrific left hand blow in the groin which doubled Olson up. Referee Bardell sent them to their respective corners and disqualified Percente. Bardell cautioned Joe about striking low several times, and the management, taking it for granted he hit low intentionally, declared he would not receive a dollar.
    Morris Rauch was given the decision over Jack Palmer in the fourth bout of the evening, which, like that in the Ryan-Daly bout, was not gracefully accepted. Palmer made it warm for the local man in the first two rounds and had a good shade on points. Rauch evened up matters in the next two, and there was not much to choose from in the fifth and sixth. A draw would have been satisfactory to the crowd.
    The burlesque bout of the night, and one which kept the crowd in a continual uproar during the six rounds, was that between Fred Morris, "Muldoon's Cyclone," and John Wille. Neither were acquainted with the first rudiments of the manly art, and that made it ludicrous. Everything in shape of blows were indulged in by both. Swings, upper cuts, straight punches, in fact, blows that were never seen before, and perhaps will not be again. Anything and everything went. The end of each round after the first saw them completely ***ged out. They staggered about like drunken sailors, and it was really a mystery how they managed to retain their feet. Morris went down several times from the force of his own blows, and Wille would have found the floor quite often had he not used his head for a balancing pole. The colored man lasted through the six rounds, however, and Bardell declared Wille the winner on work done in the earlier rounds.
     
  12. Senya13

    Senya13 Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    1900-04-18 The Chicago Daily Tribune (Chicago, IL) (page 6)
    WHITE STAYS THE LIMIT.
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    McGOVERN FAILS TO WIN AT TATTERSALL'S
    --------
    Chicago Boxer Stands Him Off by Clever Defensive Work for Five Rounds and Surprises Him in the Closing Round by Taking the Aggressive--Crowd Grows Wildly Enthusiastic Over the Exhibition--McGovern Complains of Too Much Clinching.
    --------
    For eighteen minutes last night Tommy White stood in the path of a McGovern cyclone and emerged comparatively unscathed at the finish. In addition to this the Chicago 126-pounder started a little whirlwind on his own account at the finish which sent the Brooklyn wonder to his corner with a look of regret on his face. McGovern was sad because White had as he claimed hung on to him unnecessarily.

    The 9,000 spectators who journeyed to Tattersall's to witness the encounter cared naught for this. They had seen the phenomenal Terry in action for six full rounds and had seen a local man accompany him the entire distance. As round after round went by and White walked to his corner the cheering grew louder and louder. And when in the last round White started his own little breeze of uppercuts and jabs the crowd broke out in wild applause, which was renewed as the contestants in the memorable battle filed their way to the dressing-rooms.

    It was a contest that will live long on the local annals of the game. McGovern, who had been seen in four contests in the same ring, had easily disposed of Rotchford, Haley, Smith and Santry, and was thought by most of the crowd to be able to give White his quietus before the end of the six rounds. In this he failed signally, and though he lost no friends by his failure, the honors of the go were given to White.

    The one weak point of the contest was the agreement that if both men were on their feet there was to be no decision. The concession, it is claimed, was demanded by Sam Harris, McGovern's manager, by reason of his man having to concede ten pounds in weight. It is doubtful if White weighed more than five pounds over his opponent, but he was willing to accede to the request, and the Tattersall's association announced the conditions previous to the contest.

    What the result would have been had a decision been rendered rests with Referee Siler.

    McGovern Is the Aggressor.

    McGovern was the aggressor in the first five rounds, and though many times wild in his attack he sent home many hard blows on his opponent. White clinched many times to save himself and had a clean knockdown registered against him. All this while he put up a good game fight and kept his faculties in fast working order. In the last round he cleanly outpointed his man, but it is doubtful if his work in this would have entitled him to an even break. White, in addition to having a slight advantage in height, weight, and reach, was in better condition. Not that McGovern was much out of shape, but coming in after being on the road with a show does not leave a man exactly on edge. His vigorous style of fighting, if continued for a few rounds, is bound to tell, and this was the case last night, for after the first three rounds the champion slowed down and his blows lacked their usual steam.

    It was 10:40 o'clock before the preliminary bouts were over. These were of mediocre character, the Schultz-Sherlock bout being the best contested. Barney Connors was too heavy and strong for Billy Elmer of San Francisco, the actor-pugilist. Though defeated, Elmer put up a game fight and took a hard grueling until his seconds mercifully threw up the towel. Jack Moffat, who made his first appearance since he broke his left forearm against George Gardiner in New York, entered the ring too soon and again fractured a small bone. The injury, though not so serious as the first one, will keep him out of the ring for some time. In Jim Adams of Omaha he met an opponent fully fifteen pounds heavier than himself. Moffat was aggressive throughout and had a long lead in every round. His punches, however, were not as strong as usual and Adams, who put up a thoroughly game fight, was apparently unmarked at the finish. Moffat got the decision.

    After the pair had left the ring there was a short pause and then the cheering announced the coming of the principals in the windup. White, accompanied by Harry Gilmore, Henry Stender, and Willie McGurn, was the first to enter the ring. McGovern came a few seconds later with Sam Harris, Kid Bernstein, Charley Mayhood, and his constant attendant, Constable Nelson.

    Terry a Believer in Luck.

    White had seated himself in the corner occupied by McGovern in his previous fights, and Terry, deeming it his lucky seat, insisted on tossing for it. He won, and White smilingly took the opposite chair. After receiving instructions from Referee Siler the men sat smiling awaiting the tap of the bell. White shook his fist at McGovern, who broadened his smile in response.

    The gong sounded, and McGovern almost sprinted across the ring to White. White, unliked many of the Brooklynite's victims, did not appear to be hypnotized by the fast moving fists confronting him. McGovern finally let go a right which landed on White's shoulder, and the battle was on. The little Brooklynite was the personification of energy, and White's defensive abilities were taxed to the utmost. He ducked, clinched, and blocked as best he could, but the flail-like arms of Terry were ever on the move, and many blows went home.

    The I-told-you-so portion of the crowd settled down, looking for a speedy termination. White slipped over, and rested on his knee for a count of eight. He then jabbed Terry's face to show he was still in the fight. McGovern then fell over, and a few seconds later White did the same thing. McGovern then let go a left swing, which White avoided by dropping to his knee. The bell rang and the first stage of the journey was reached.

    The looked-for knockout did not materialize in the second round. McGovern began a fusillade of short-arm blows for the body, but here White's generalship came into play, and he soon clinched to a safe position.

    In the middle of the round White took a hand at attacking, and two stiff jabs on Terry's nose brought applause. Terry never let up in his attack, but many times was wild. He would make a short swing with his left and then send his right hard, followed by another left, and they came so fast that White, clever as he was, had to take them. Terry went to his corner, his reddened face showing signs of his exertion.

    Sets White's Eye to Bleeding.

    Early in the third round McGovern sent his right over White's right eye, cutting a bad gash from which the blood flowed freely. Terry was anxious and wildly forced the pace. He tried a hard left uppercut and fell against White on the ropes. After much hard fighting Terry swung his left to the breast, scoring a clean knockdown. White did not appear dazed, but took a count of eight, and when Terry foxily walked behind him he wheeled around on his knees and faced him. The sound of the bell brought a rousing cheer from the crowd, which began to realize that White had a good chance to go the limit.

    In the fourth round McGovern again fell over after making two wild swings. McGovern got White in the corner and rained in several savage blows, but White came out strong and fought back.

    Fighting in the fifth round was slower. When the sixth started most of the spectators looked for a repetition of the previous rounds, with White mostly on the defensive. After several clinches White suddenly let himself out. Starting his attack with a long, swinging uppercut, he connected hard with Terry's body. Then he drove a similar blow to the chin, followed with another. McGovern was astonished, even if not damaged, and set out to reply in kind. White met him with a stiff left jab and then again uppercut him. He had all the better of the round, and stalled McGovern's hard rush at the finish by clinching.

    McGovern said after the battle that it was a hard task to give a man weight and then have him hang on.

    "He's too quick and too heavy for me," the little champion added. "And let me tell you that anybody who says White can't hit hard is a fool. He hit me harder than anybody I ever met."

    White said: "The blow which cut my eye was not one that McGovern delivered, but was the result of his rushing into me; but of course that is the luck of a fight. The blow which McGovern landed on my jaw in the first round was the hardest I ever got in my life; but when I got up I was all right and I said to myself: 'Well, I don't believe he can land one any harder than that and it didn't put me out, so I'm all right.'"
     
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  13. Senya13

    Senya13 Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Fight by Rounds.

    FIRST ROUND--Both sparred cautiously for a few seconds. White was the first to lead, putting a left jab on Terry's jaw. McGovern rushed, landing a storm of blows on White's body, forcing him to the ropes. McGovern then fell short with a left swing. White countered lightly with a left to the face. McGovern rushed, landing a left on the body and a right on the head, White keeping away. McGovern kept after his man, attempting to swing a left to the head and a right to the body. White put in a stiff left on Terry's mouth. White was cool and confident. On the next rush, however, McGovern knocked him to the floor with a left on the head. White took the limit and came up strong and as Terry rushed he placed a stiff left in the Easterner's face. McGovern swung left and right and missed both, falling to the floor from the force of his own blows. He got up immediately and, rushing, wrestled White to the floor. Tommy got up at once and landed a right on Terry's ear. Just as the gong sounded McGovern dropped White with a left hook to the chin.

    SECOND ROUND--White landed two lefts to the face. McGovern then rushed White, pounding him badly with right and left, and forcing him to a clinch. When they broke McGovern landed a right on the ribs, and followed with another to the pit of the stomach. White did not flinch, but as Terry came at him sent a stiff left and right to body. McGovern whipped his left to stomach and swung a hard right to jaw, staggering White. White jabbed his left to face, McGovern coming back with a left hook to the body. White jabbed his left twice to the face. McGovern then rushed, swinging right and left to the face, and followed with two lefts to chin, putting Tommy to the bad again. McGovern then rushed White around the ring, but was unable to reach him with effect, Tommy jabbing his left three times to the face without return. Just before the gong sounded Terry swung a hard right to White's eye, cutting it slightly.

    THIRD ROUND--White landed a left in the face and then sent it to the jaw. McGovern landed a left and right to the neck and eye, opening the cut. White jabbed a left to the face and a right on the head and then uppercut with his right, and in the clinch put his right hard to the ribs when they broke away. White put in a hard left on the nose and ducked a right swing. McGovern rushed and put a left swing on White's jaw, then missed right and left swings. McGovern put a right to the body and left to the face with apparent effect. McGovern swung right to ribs. Then, with another right to the stomach, he sent Tommy to the floor, White taking a five count. Tommy went to his corner bleeding badly from his eye.

    FOURTH ROUND--McGovern came up full of business and rushed, but received four hard lefts on the face. McGovern swung a hard left to White's bad eye and a stiff right on the ribs, following it with two lefts on the jaw, forcing White on the ropes. McGovern swung left and right, but missed both, and fell to the floor. Getting up he put in a hard right on the ribs, then rushing Tommy into a neutral corner almost forced him to the floor with a perfect shower of blows. Tommy finally fought himself free and put a stiff left to the face as McGovern followed him. White landed a left hook to the face and right to the jaw, and followed it with two left jabs to Terry's mouth.

    FIFTH ROUND--McGovern opened with two left jabs and they came to a clinch. He forced the fighting and swung a left to the nose, and another clinch followed. White twice jabbed cleanly without return, and McGovern again came after him, and they clinched. McGovern sent a straight left to the stomach and again they clinched. McGovern, who was tiring, sent left and right to the body, and again they clinched. The fighting was slow and a few hisses were heard. McGovern sent a right to the wind and brought his left up to the face. McGovern continued to force, and White did some clever ducking. McGovern hooked his right to the kidneys and the bell rang.

    SIXTH ROUND--McGovern, acting under instructions, went in to force the fighting, but found White all there, and they clinched three times in succession. White made a wonderful rally. He swung his right to the head. McGovern sent his left to the wind and they clinched. White sent a long swinging uppercut to the chin and the crowd went wild as he twice repeated the dose. Terry was rattled and White easily avoided his rush. White jabbed with his left to the face and again sent a right uppercut. This he followed with two jabs. They clinched several times during the remainder of the round, which was all in favor of White on points.

    Results of Preliminaries.

    The first preliminary to the McGovern-White fight was between Young Malone and Sammy Keefe of Chicago at 118 pounds. The fight was stopped in the third round, Keefe being practically out.

    Kid Schultz was given the decision over Joe Sherlock at the end of the sixth round. The men fought at 122 pounds.

    Barney Connors of Chicago defeated Billy Elmer, the actor, of San Francisco in the third round, the fight being stopped by Referee Siler. Elmer was knocked down clean in the first round, again in the second, but knocked Connors against the ropes immediately after regaining his feet.

    Elmer was groggy when he went to his corner in the second and was weak when he came up for the third. Connors battered him badly, and when the fight was stopped Elmer was covered with blood. He made a remarkably game fight, and resisted fiercely when his seconds tried to take him to his corner. The round had gone one minute and ten seconds when Connors was given the decision. The men fought at 150 pounds.

    "Kid" Garfield was given the decision on points over Henry Lumbard at the end of six rounds.

    Jack Moffatt of Chicago outpointed Jim Adams of Omaha in six rather slow rounds. This was Moffatt's first appearance since he broke his left arm in a fight in New York several months ago, but in spite of that handicap the fight was his from the first. Moffatt injured his arm in the final round, but not seriously.
     
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  14. Senya13

    Senya13 Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    1900-04-18 The Daily Inter Ocean (Chicago, IL) (page 8)
    TOMMY WHITE LASTS
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    Chicago Man Makes a Clever Showing Against McGovern.
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    SIX FIERCE ROUNDS
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    Both Men on Their Feet at the Finish of the Fight.
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    Referee Siler, in Accordance with an Agreement Between the Fighters, Gives No Decision.
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    He is a very game fighter, and a clever general. He was too big for me. He is a great big feather-weight, and I was giving him, anyhow, ten pounds the better of it. I weighed only a fraction over 122 pounds in the Turkish bath this afternoon. If anybody thinks White cannot hit I can tell the man a different story. I knew he was a good man when I was fighting preliminaries. That's all. He was too big and awful quick.--Terry McGovern.

    He can hit harder than that. He is the greatest hitter I ever met in all my career. The first round was the only one in which he hurt me much. He caught me in the jaw, and I thought my head would fly over to the West Side. I clinched in a daze, and when my head became clear again I figured out that if that blow could not put me out none he had could. While it hurt awfully, it gave me confidence. About the body blows? Well, they do you no good. He is a grand little fighter, and very fair. The cut I got over the left eye was not done by a blow. It came from a butt, but it was unintentional on McGovern's part. He was fighting all the time; but honestly, after that first wallop in the jaw failed to do the work I felt that I was safe.--Tommy White.

    Terry McGovern, the champion featherweight of the world, was unable to knock out Tommy White in six rounds at Tattersall's last night, and according to the agreement entered into before the battle, there was no decision. The 12,000 people who were packed into the big building cheered the contestants to the echo.

    White put up a game battle, and, not content to be the receiving end of the battery all the time, he carried the fighting into McGovern's territory on a number of occasions during the eighteen minutes of fighting. Both fought their best, and there wasn't much to choose between the pair when the final bell rang.

    The crowd didn't like the announcement made in the early part of the contest that there was to be no decision if both men stood the six rounds, but this was the desire of Sam Harris, McGovern's manager. Harris said he did not want to give so much away in weight and then take a chance of his man's being outpointed. There did not seem to be such a great difference in the weights, however, when the men stacked up at the beginning of the first round. Terry wore his usual Irish flag for a belt, and Tommy wore no belt at all.

    White was the first to land. It was a light left, and did not ruffle Terry. McGovern then commenced the tactics that have won him many a battle, but they did not avail against White, who blocked cleverly and alternated with left jabs to the face and occasional right uppercuts. Terry, however, was now slow, and his right and left kept working like trip-hammers.

    It was about the same in the succeeding rounds. White's left played an important part in the contest, and Terry's right and left went to the jaw and body time and again. The crowd went wild at the close, and cheer after cheer greeted White's showing.

    Jack Moffat obtained the decision over Jim Adams of Omaha in six rounds. Moffat's arm, which was recently broken, troubled him a great deal, and he was not able to knock his man out, although he had no trouble at all in defeating him.

    Billy Elmer found a Tartar in Barney Connors, the rolling-mill man, and a kind-hearted referee was the only thing that prevented a knock-out. As it was, Siler stopped the contest about the middle of the third round, when Elmer was all but gone.

    Referee Bardell stopped the Young Malone-Sam Keefe bout in the third round, and gave the decision to Malone. The other man was far up ***** street when the contest was stopped.

    Kid Garfield won from Henry Lumbard in six rounds, and Kid Shultz beat Joe Sherlock in six.

    The summaries follow:

    Story of the Fight.

    Young Malone and Sam Keefe were the first pair to oppose each other. They weighed in at 118 pounds; both are local men. Jimmy Bardell acted as referee.

    The first round was fairly even, with plenty of vicious blows on face and body exchanged. Malone had all the better of the second round, and sent Keefe to the floor once by a succession of body punches. Malone was the fresher of the two at the beginning of the third. He went right at his opponent's body and landed some stiff blows. Keefe tried occasionally for the head, but did no damage. He finally grew so weak that Referee Bardell stopped the bout and awarded the decision to Malone.

    Henry Lumbard and Kid Garfield were the next pair up. They weighed in at 115 pounds, and are both of Chicago. Jimmy Bardell was the referee. Some pretty work was indulged in in the first round, but neither hurt the other to any appreciable extent. The men fought viciously in the second, and Lumbard had a slight shade. He fell to his knees once, but got up in an instant. Both men were well trained, and showed little effect of the blows they received. Honors were even in the third round, and the crowd frequently applauded the clever, fast work of the men. Lumbard landed on the head frequently in the fourth, but once, when Garfield sent a stiff one to the jaw, Henry was content to hug for a while. They were sparring at the bell.

    The fast work in the preceding four rounds did not affect either of the contestants, and they were as chipper at the beginning of the fifth as at the beginning of the first. They gave a good exhibition, and pleased the crowd. Both went for the decision at the sound of the bell that started the sixth round. Garfield staggered his man with a right on the jaw after some hard exchanges. Lumbard sent a right to the ear, and Garfield a left and right hard to face. Lumbard clinched when Garfield sent him against the ropes with a hard right to the jaw. The last part of the round favored Garfield, and he was awarded the decision.

    The third bout of the evening was between Kid Schultz and Joe Sherlock, at 122 pounds. Malachy Hogan was the referee.

    The men started in at the sound of the bell as though they meant business. They sent and received plenty of rights and lefts on the body and head. Sherlock's left ear was badly cut by a jab from Schultz, and it bled profusely. The Kid found Joe's body and face frequently in the second, and had the better of the argument all through. Sherlock went to the floor in a clinch and stayed down five seconds. He was groggy at the bell.

    Joe tried running tactics when the third began, and for a while they proved successful. Schultz finally cornered his man and put right and left on the body. They remained close to each other to the end of the round, and Sherlock managed to return a few of Schultz's blows.

    The fourth round was fast and hard enough to please any one, Schultz having the better of it. However, Sherlock sent a few rights to the jaw that staggered his man. The fifth round was in Schultz's favor by a safe margin. Sherlock made his best showing in the last round, but was unable to overcome Schultz's big lead and the latter was awarded the decision.

    Billy Elmer, the actor pugilist, and Barney Connors, the rolling-mill man, were the next to appear. George Siler was the referee. Clean breaks were announced for this bout.

    First Round--Elmer ducked a hard left. Connors sent left and right to the body, and Elmer sent left to the face. They exchanged hard rights. Elmer sent right and left to the body. Connors put Elmer down with a left on the jaw. The latter took the count. Connors was wrestled to the floor, but was up in an instant. Elmer landed often enough, but his blows lacked steam.

    Second Round--Elmer sent a left to the face and Connors returned the same kind of a blow. They clinched. Barney sent a hard left to the jaw and put two rights on the body. Elmer ducked a hard left. Connors sent right and left to head. He knocked Elmer down with a hard right on the jaw. Billy took the nine count. They clinched and Connors almost went through the ropes when he missed a left.

    Third Round--They sparred. Connors put a light left on the body, then staggered Elmer twice with lefts and rights to the head. Elmer ducked a good left. Connors smashed Elmer's eye with a right, cutting it terribly. Elmer was game, but almost out when Referee Siler stopped the bout and awarded Connors the decision. The third round lasted one minute and ten seconds.
     
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  15. Senya13

    Senya13 Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Moffat Defeats Adams.

    The semi-windup of the evening was between Jack Moffat of this city and Jim Adams of Omaha. Malachy Hogan was the referee. The men fought at catch weights.

    They began operations carefully when the bell sounded. Moffat sent a left to the head and a right to the body a moment later. Jack did most of the leading and landing, and it was not until the contest was two minutes old that Adams woke up. When he did he made it interesting for a few seconds, but soon was content to let the local man do the punching.

    Moffat reached the jaw hard early in the second. They clinched. Jack sent his right to the head. He landed left and right on face. Adams missed three or four good leads for the jaw. Moffat tried hard for a knock-out, and had all the better of the round. Adams reached the jaw with the right when the third began, and fierce fighting at close quarters followed. Jack sent right to the body, and Jim right to the head. Adams slipped down without being hit. Moffat sent two lefts to the jaw, and Adams appeared tired. They were clinched a good part of the time. Moffat sent left to the body and right to the jaw. Adams reached the head, and Moffat landed a stiff left on the jaw just before the bell rang.

    The men came together in lively fashion when the fourth round began, and the crowd cheered. After several exchanges Moffat sent Jim down with a straight left, fairly on the point of the jaw. Hogan counted seven before Adams got up. The remainder of the round was all Moffat's.

    The Chicagoan tried hard for a knock-out in the fifth, but Adams' very awkwardness prevented it. He was unable to land more than one or two blows himself, but Jack's frequent punches were either not clean enough or not hard enough to do the trick.

    Jack rushed his man in the sixth and reached the jaw with a hard right. He sent lefts and rights to the body and head, and a light exchange of lefts followed. Moffat reached the jaw with two lefts in succession, and then smashed rights and lefts on the jaw at will. Clinching was all that saved Adams. Referee Hogan had difficulty in breaking the men. Adams was all but out at the bell, and the referee awarded Moffat the decision.

    Moffat complained of his injured arm after the bout.

    White Faces McGovern.

    A slight delay and the ring was cleared for the grand wind-up of the evening between Terry McGovern, the Brooklyn wonder, and Tommy White, the popular 126-pound champion. Cheers marked the entrance of White into the ring. He was closed followed by McGovern. The stocky, ruddy Terry looked a sharp contrast to the tall, pale local man.

    Sam Harris, George Maywood, and Kid Bernstein were the seconds of McGovern, while Harry Gilmore, Ed Ready, Harry Stender, and Willie McGurn looked after White. George Siler was the referee.

    Tommy won the toss for corners and selected McGovern's favorite place. He gave it up to the conqueror of Dixon, however, and the crowd applauded. The usual instructions preceded the first bell.

    First Round--They sparred, and then White landed a light left on the head. McGovern rushed White to the ropes. Terry hooked the right to the head and sent his left to the face. Tom blocked a left. Mac landed a hard left on the stomach. White sent his left to the face. Terry misses with the left. He then landed right and left on the head. Terry sent Tom down with a left on the jaw. White got up after counting six. Mac sent his left and right to the body. McGovern slipped to the floor. Tommy sent a left to the face and was wrestled down. They mixed it up. White went down from a left on the face.

    Second Round--Tom sent two lefts to the face and Terry landed fast lefts and rights on the body. The local man clinched. Mac sent a hard right to the body and White clinched again. Tommy lifted a swift uppercut to the body. Fast infighting followed. Then Tommy sent another left to the head. Terry replied with a hard right to the chin. Tom landed a straight left on the chin. Terry jolted a left to the chin. They clinched. Terry landed a right on the jaw. Tom sent a hard right to the head. The Brooklynite was after his opponent like a bull. White sent a left to the head, and Terry landed a hard left on the face at the bell.

    Third Round--Terry missed a right for the head. Tommy landed a left on the face. They clinched, and the Chicagoan's right eye was badly cut. Terry sent a left to the jaw. Tom landed two lefts on the head and put a right on the jaw. Terry sent right to the body and missed several rights and lefts. The Brooklynite staggered Tom with lefts and rights. Mac reached the body with a right. White went to the floor under a left hook. He got up at the nine count and they clinched. Mac was sending lefts and rights in when the bell rang.

    Fourth Round--White sent three lefts to the face. Terry landed a left on the jaw. Mac ripped in a right to the stomach and the men clinched. They exchanged lefts and Terry sent a left to the jaw. He then sent a left to the face, missing two rights, and fell down. White slipped and fell. Mac sent a left to the face and Tom did the like. Mac rushed White to the corner and sent rights and lefts into the head and body. Mac punched the stomach and Tommy sent a left to the face. They were clinched at the bell.

    Fifth Round--Mac jolted the face with his left. Tommy put his left on the face. Mac landed lefts and rights on the body and kept after White. Tommy kept his left in Terry's face. Terry sent a right to the body. Mac sent right and left to the body. Tommy was very tired. They clinched. Siler had to break them. Mac ducked several lefts and sent three lefts to the face and a right to the body. Tommy clinched. Terry was fighting hard in a clinch at the bell.

    Sixth Round--They shook hands. Terry sent a left to the face and Tom clinched. Mac fought like a demon, and Terry ripped in a left to the body. Mac ducked a left. Tom sent a left to the face. Mac sent right and left to the body. Tom sent a hard right uppercut to the chin. Both were fighting like mad men. Tom kept trying with right uppercuts. Terry did not try to guard Tom's lefts, but tried for a knock-out. However, he could not reach the jaw in the manner he desired. They just broke from a clinch when the bell rang.
     
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