Left Uppercut is weak

Discussion in 'Boxing Training' started by Toney F*** U, Sep 7, 2020.


  1. Toney F*** U

    Toney F*** U Boxing junkie Full Member

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    I fight orthodox and my left uppercut is my weakest punch, it’s hard to get a lot of momentum into the punch since there’s no room to. It feels awkward throwing it with technique so I mainly just throw it like an arm punch. I see pros and even people at my gym who are effective with it and I’m just wondering what’s the best way to throw it?
     
  2. Heisenberg

    Heisenberg @excelsioroptimum Full Member

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    Contrary to belief, the left uppercut is not usually a power shot from orthodox. It’s normally used to lift the target (head) for the right cross/hook. However, if you watch for example Povetkin, he uses the jab to load his front leg and power the shot up from his left hip. Against Whyte he drove through the leg, fired the hip, the shoulder and then the arm. Think of the same kinetic linkage when you throw a stone. Hope some of that garble made sense...
     
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  3. ecto55

    ecto55 Well-Known Member Full Member

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    I'll give it a go explaining, notwithstanding this is the worst medium for discussing boxing technique - honestly ham radio would be better. I take Heisenburg's point re. LU's and I don't disagree with it other than to say that if you work a anything long enough you can make a weapon of it. LU's are great in the sense that they're usually unexpected and unseen. You can throw them as a lead, but I wouldn't advise it unless you're super fluid, comfortable / in 'the zone' and mixing your leads up to show dominance. If someone threw a lead LU at me I'd be salivating while I waited for it again - with a fast right hand! Because of that danger, throw your LU's speedily, only in combo or as a counter and only when your going to land them. You can get crushed on the counter.

    Re. basic mechanics - if your training at a pro gym you'll see how they're thrown generally - weight onto the front foot, if you want to 'load up' on the shot put more bodyweight % by dropping the body a tad, drive that bodyweight upwards from the front foot, some people like to drive up on the ball of their feet but once you've got your bodyweight / timing going into the punch the difference is negligible, keep your elbow in and most importantly, your arm and shoulder loose. Don't tense your arm or shoulder up - the force in the punch comes from your body weight, its not a bicep curl (don't drop your arm to got it lower than your target, drop your body), the more relaxed the punch is the more speed / snap you can put into it. The timing's pretty simple and easier to pick up than eg. a left hook, like anything, start slowly, learn the rhythm, then add speed.

    Re. the punch quality itself - the Thai's love to drive their uppercuts about a foot threw the target, but I think that's unnecessary and potentially dangerous if / when you miss, plus it can mean you develop a tendency to push your punches - I prefer short punches with snap so look to finish your punch say 6 inches above the impact point. The further away the target the less you'll have on it, long range LU's are really only point scorers and use too much shoulder - they're useful in the amateurs though in tandem with jab variations, again for points.The further away the target, the more you need to reduce the distance with your body by turning your left shoulder towards the target.

    If your still a novice and your having trouble relaxing under stress (sparring), add a few inches onto your judgment of distance on the horizontal plane...so that if you've involuntarily tensed and shorted your own punch, you've already compensated for it. So, at least until you're comfortable, got your eye in and are relaxed, for a LU to the chin, aim for the throat; for a LU to the face / nose, aim for under the chin etc. That way, if you've tensed your punch up and involuntarily shortened its arc, you'll still catch something.

    Those mechanics are super simple and copying others is how most learn it...but here's some shortcuts to common problems.

    Some people learn LH's first and tend to do a similar weight shift from left (front) to right (rear) legs - if you do this it will still hurt but your splitting your bodyweight. Remember that a well thrown LU puts the bodyweight up from the left foot and kind of leaves it there after the punch is thrown - that's why following a LU with a LH is so easy - the bodyweight is already there and you only need to pivot your body to the right into a LH.

    There's a lot to be said for hooking off your LU's, plus throw body shots, there's an immense amount of target there even if the guy is covering up. With LU's, I recommend throwing fully-leveraged LH's (elbow down, wrist c0cked) as opposed to square hooks (elbow up, palm down) just because it's easier to transition from LU to LH's. The old era guys all did it but the footage is poor - Roy Jones Jr used LU's and LH's well in clusters, Shea Neary was another, I remember Ricard Lopez threw good LU's too, although I don't think with LH's in tandem. For double LU's have a look at Tyson against Nielsen - lovely work on a heavy bag there!

    The easiest LU to start with is one from a tight clinch - get your left arm free, lean slightly to your left, bodyweight onto the front foot, elbow in, spear a LU up towards his chin / nose / face with a slight lean back to make some distance between you both, it should shoot up past your own face only about 3 - 6 inches away. Tommy Hearns would throw those in a clinch - afterwards an opponent can't rest / recover in the clinch as easily...always thinking another's coming If you've disentangled from his right arm just before you throw the shot there's no counter right hand - maybe he'll throw a counter LH so right glove to right elbow. It's an easy one to practice in sparring - almost a free hit. For beginners, its easy and if you stuff it up, because your almost still on his chest, just clinch again.

    Gee I wish I was young again, let us know how you go, hopefully you'll be turning those nose taps on in no time, besta luck.
     
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  4. Toney F*** U

    Toney F*** U Boxing junkie Full Member

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    Thanks man, I was about to just give up on that punch
     
  5. f1ght3rz

    f1ght3rz Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Some solid theory stuff in here.

    I don't know how much of S&C training you're doing and i know this isn't necessarily a power isssue but i can recommend adding the Landmine Windshield Wipers to your S&C training. It helped me a lot to develop some more pop behind my uppercuts in general.
     
  6. greynotsoold

    greynotsoold Boxing Addict Full Member

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    A lot of the effectiveness of the left uppercut depends on putting yourself in position to land it. In my opinion, one of the prettiest moves in boxing is when a guy slips a jab, slides in and lands a left uppercut/ right hand combination, then rolls out.
    It all ties the coordination of your hands and feet, and how you slide your weight to get it to one place so that you can turn on it. It would take me about 25 minutes to show you how to do it and to get you efficient at doing it, but I haven't a clue how to explain it by typing.
     
  7. Likethembigroundchunky

    Likethembigroundchunky New Member Full Member

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    Hows your right uppercut?

    If its good its likely because you have good mechanics so try practising your LU from a southpaw stance. Your brain will replicate the mechanics from your mirrored stance, learning the mechanics which you can transfer back to orthodox. You can also try a southpaw lead uppercut (if its effective) to get a feel for the mechanics.

    My left arm is not really attached to my brain so my coach suggested this to learn the proper motion of the lead hook as my rear hook is solid.

    There is lots of bull**** on youtube but apart from a 1v1 with a coach its really your only choice.
     
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  8. Toney F*** U

    Toney F*** U Boxing junkie Full Member

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    My right uppercut is good, compact and quick. Thanks for the tips