Let's talk about Nova vs Baer brawls

Discussion in 'Classic Boxing Forum' started by 70sFan865, Aug 9, 2019.



  1. Seamus

    Seamus Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    Not smart.

    I always appreciate fighters who understand range, Vitali, Monzon, Floyd come to mind. One moment lacking concentration on that aspect can lead to disaster.
     
  2. Unforgiven

    Unforgiven Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    Rhythm is, by definition, predictable.
    It is also inevitable. Everyone moves with some degree of rhythm.
    I find the best boxers are a bit herky-jerky and have a very broken rhythm, very unpredictable, unorthodox. They are often not instantly "aesthetic" and take time to appreciate.

    Fighters who are very rhythmic are more predictable.
    If WE can immediately detect their rhythm, there opponent usually does as well.
    The ones who get away with it are super fast.
     
  3. mrkoolkevin

    mrkoolkevin Not here for the fairy tales Full Member

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    It depends. Guys who fight with a rhythm can still improvise or change the beat. As long as they’re not using the same exact sequences of punches and movement all the time. But I guess fluidity is what I really had in mind. Herky jerky head movement and feints are great but when it comes to footwork and combination punching, I think that the most impressive and enjoyable to watch fighters have their own rhythm.
     
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  4. roughdiamond

    roughdiamond Blue Valentine Full Member

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    Jack Dempsey said:

    'Sparring not only improves your skill, but it also conditions your body for fighting by forcing your muscles to become accustomed to the violent, broken movements that distinguish fighting from any other activity.
    Much has been written about rhythm in fighting. Nearly every scrapper develops some rhythm to his movements in footwork, bobbing, weaving, etc. And some fancy Dans appear to have almost as much rhythm as a ballet dancer when they shadow-box. But when the chips are down, rhythm is destroyed. Your opponent's feints, leads, counters and defensive moves will break your rhythm in a hurry and will force your movements, on attack or defense, to be necessities of the split-second-to be violent and broken.
    Because the movements in fighting are violent and broken, fighting is perhaps the most tiring of all human activities.
    Some college experts insist that rowing on a crew is more exhausting than boxing. I don't know about that. I never rowed on a crew. But I do know that crewmen have a rhythm or "beat," to which they time their strokes. A fellow may be a perfectly conditioned athlete for some other activity-like basketball, football, baseball, rodeo, riding, acrobatics, hurdling, wrestling, etc.-but if he hasn't had sparring practice, he will be completely exhausted by two or three minutes of fast fighting. His muscles will be unaccustomed to the movements, and he will be unaccustomed to breathing while making those movements and while being hit.'
     
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  5. 70sFan865

    70sFan865 Active Member Full Member

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    Say all you want about Baer, but he was good at disrupting opponents rythm. He could make himself look like a fool for 2 minutes of round and then surprisingly pressure for a 15 seconds and land something extremely hard that would make fighter play safer for the rest of the fight.
     
  6. red cobra

    red cobra Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    My intent here is not to get in a pointless argument with some know-nothing noob who should really be in the General Forum, but rather to prove a point to him that he might educate himself.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2019
  7. Jamzy ⭐

    Jamzy ⭐ Active Member Full Member

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    Shows who the real noob is, and that is you. Holmes is obviously playing it up for the cameras there.
     
  8. red cobra

    red cobra Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    The internet is awfully big...I bet you can find an Idiot's forum somewhere out there...it would be a better fit for you than classic boxing.
     
  9. Bah Lance

    Bah Lance Member Full Member

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    Lapses happen, even to the men you listed. Easy to criticize from our chairs.

    Few fighters deliberately want to get caught cold walking backwards. You can get tired, rocked, or distracted.

    In this sequence Bear disguised the right by loping wide behind the back hand push. Even with his guard up, would be hard to defend a punch like that you didn't see. He could have stayed inside but was cornered and vulnerable. A loop that finds it's mark can be hard to properly defend, there's a reason they are effective despite looking telegraphed to an observer.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2019
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  10. Jamzy ⭐

    Jamzy ⭐ Active Member Full Member

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    And to you too, Bruce Lee.