Maybe I don't understand physics but size=power, right?

Discussion in 'World Boxing Forum' started by Boxed Ears, Jul 11, 2021.

  1. bandeedo

    bandeedo Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    The uppercut is a great punch to illustrate what I was talking about. Uppercuts require less form, it’s more about sheer power. You don’t require the weight behind you, since you’re pushing directly against the ground, which is immovable. It’s like doing a bicep curl. Your weight and position relative to the ground does not need as much balance between ground and target. You basically become as heavy as the ground itself, so your punch is now only limited by how much power your muscles can generate as they push directly opposite the weight of the ground.
     
  2. Boxed Ears

    Boxed Ears The Best Fighters Are American Because Nationalism Full Member

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    Okay, gosh, this is way over my head. I'm trying to follow this but I don't know about torque. Is that like when you twist into your punch? Let's take two people who are 203 pounds (just an example) and they both jump off a building at the same time, they both hit the ground with A LOT of force, no matter how tall that building is or isn't, right? But if you make one of those guys 250 pounds and make the other guy still 203, then there's forty-something pounds more difference between them and that guy whom you made bigger, he's gonna hit the ground that much faster which = that much harder. So even if he's twisting around when it happens, he's still faster and harder if you're the ground feeling that hit. So, it almost doesn't matter what you do is my interpretation. You're still big enough to have the power which equals speed. And THAT negates timing.
     
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  3. MagicE

    MagicE Active Member Full Member

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    One thing I've never been able to understand is how sometimes a slow punch can have devastating power. How the **** does that work??!?
     
  4. bandeedo

    bandeedo Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    no. they both fall at the same speed, but the bigger guy, because hes bigger, will have more impact on whatever it is he hits when he splatters. there may be a slight difference in speed, depending on who is causing more wind resistance on the way down, but gravity will pull them down at the same speed..
     
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  5. Boxed Ears

    Boxed Ears The Best Fighters Are American Because Nationalism Full Member

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    Okay, so, if one guy got more metallic minerals in his system, does that make the theory of magnevity stronger and pull him down quicker?
     
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  6. Boxed Ears

    Boxed Ears The Best Fighters Are American Because Nationalism Full Member

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    And then what if they're both vertical? Does one guy's punch get attracted to the other guy more because he's bigger or because THE OTHER GUY is bigger?
     
  7. Mike_b

    Mike_b Active Member Full Member

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    Most of the world's strongest men are big buggars. They're not necessarily ripped, but have a lot of mass. I watched a video with big boi from strength cartel hold his own with a ex world's strongest man. Mind you he was roided to the gills. No shame in his game, just 336 pounds of pure muscle.
     
  8. bandeedo

    bandeedo Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    of course. you dont want to jump off a building wearing braces, you will get shot teeth first into the ground, youll be magnevitized.
     
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  9. mccaughey85

    mccaughey85 Member Full Member

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    Mass x acceleration = power
    Plenty of Big strong muscular guys have very little punch power due to lack of acceleration/speed. Combine a big strong guy with natural speed, teach that person to punch with excellent technique and you have a serious punching power. Heavyweight boxers being the prime examples of applying these ingredients together.
     
  10. Decker

    Decker Well-Known Member Full Member

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    I'll keep this short. Without going into details, I'm a quant guy by profession. You gave a very good, digestible explanation with examples.
     
  11. Likethembigroundchunky

    Likethembigroundchunky Member Full Member

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    Force = mass x acceleration is not the right equation. That tells you how much force you need to apply to a certain mass to change its speed by a certain amount.

    More applicable is force = 1/2 mass x velocity squared. Thats how much energy an object has at a certain fixed speed. You can see that if you increase either mass or the speed you increase the amount of force. Increasing the mass won't increase the force as much as increasing the speed though. Problem is its hard to change the speed of your punches by a signicant amount. Its much easier to add mass to the equation by either bulking up or learning to punch properly.

    Take a jab. Standard arm flick style jab as fast you can throw it. Now jab properly like Jack dempsey would teach you. Your jab might be slower but you have more mass in the equation hence a more powerful punch.

    Hooks are different because then torque and angular momentum starts to get involved. Even having a inch longer arms will improve the power. Like most physics - a basic question starts to get difficult to express mathematically.
     
  12. Dodgy Syrup

    Dodgy Syrup Active Member banned Full Member

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    Thanks for the kind words.

    What is a "quant guy", if you don't mind me asking?
     
  13. FuMaster

    FuMaster Well-Known Member Full Member

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    There's a lot that goes into impact force. Just because you're 300lbs doesn't mean all 300lbs of you goes into a punch. I think it is about a 10th of your body weight. Could be wrong. If you have good technique with your hips, and tighter punches to lessen kinetic energy loss than more of your mass x acceleration is applied to the punch. This is why some smaller guys can have as much power as guys a few divisions up.
     
  14. Dodgy Syrup

    Dodgy Syrup Active Member banned Full Member

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    Definitely.

    Technique is very important.

    The way a fighter places his feet, the turn of the hips, the shoulder, the rotation of the wrist.

    You will often hear that when throwing a punch you aim behind and through the target, as if you are aiming at the space just behind an opponents chin not right on the tip of it.

    This will result in you driving through the target, so you end up almost, but not quite, fully extended as you hit the chin in question.

    GGG is a good example of a guy who turned his wrist, rolling through the shot, punching down and past the impact spot as he made contact on an opponent - it was especially noticeable when he went for a punch on the top of the other guys head (above the temple).
     
  15. timeout

    timeout Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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