The Best of the Rest: 175lbs Tier II Tournie - Round 2 - 2: John Conteh UD15 Joey Maxim

Discussion in 'Classic Boxing Forum' started by McGrain, Jul 19, 2021.

Who will win?

Poll closed Jul 22, 2021.
  1. Conteh T/KO

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Conteh Points

    83.3%
  3. Maxim T/KO

    8.3%
  4. Maxim Points

    8.3%
  1. McGrain

    McGrain Diamond Dog Staff Member

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    What i've done is i've lifted top tiers out of my top fifty at the poundage, fiddled it a little bit to minimise guys with no footage and used the remaining 32 names plus some subs to develop a seeded tournament to uncover "the best of the rest" at the poundage, with you, the denizens of the world's greatest boxing history forum, casting the deciding vote.

    Pick your man! Write however many details you like or don't in a post below. But maybe try to post, to keep things moving a little bit. You have three days.

    And let's be nice. No reason for disagreeing over total fantasies after all!


    15 Rounds, 1960s rules and ref. 10 points must. I'll only vote where there's a tie.

    Round of Thirty-Two Fight 12: John Conteh vs Joey Maxim

    JOHN CONTEH (34-4-1)

    John Conteh was ranked among the four best light-heavyweights on the planet by Ring Magazine for an astonishing seven years. Such longevity at the very top of the division is almost unheard of, but Conteh established this feat in what was the deepest and strongest light-heavyweight division since World War II.

    He was very nearly claimed by the heavyweight division however, and not after he’d done the damage at 175lbs like so many of his peers but before – Conteh cut his teeth on heavyweights and moved down among the smaller men only after his first loss, supposedly upon the advice of Muhammad Ali. He arrived with a splash, crushing incumbent European champion and number five contender, Rudiger Schmidtke in twelve rounds in March of 1973. As always, Conteh collected that title in great style, employing feints (while he himself was almost impossible to feint), jabs (while he himself was almost impossible to outjab) and a spiteful right hand to stop the German in twelve.

    These are passing comments on one of the division’s true stylists that hardly capture his essence, however. Conteh’s left-hand should have belonged to a more committed fighter; he was as famous in the UK for shunning his training and his love of the nightlife as he was for his wonderful talents. Both jab and hook were of the absolute highest class and his right, when he dropped it, was a hurtful punch. The right was a Conteh weakness though. He threw it rarely in his later career most especially after breaking it in a car crash, although injuries to both hands plagued him throughout his career. Inactivity married to certain impracticalities in his character also cost him both money and prestige, his refusal to go through with a contest with Miguel Cuello, announced just three days before the fight, hurting him less perhaps than his failure to meet legitimate champion Bob Foster.

    Still, Conteh built an excellent resume with his smooth box-punching, besting former beltholder Vicente Rondon in nine, the superb Chris Finnegan who had pushed Bob Foster as hard as he would be during his title run, the hugely experienced Tom Bogs, Jorge Victor Ahumada in his superb strap-winning effort and a defence of that strap in a wonderful fight with Yaqi Lopez.

    Unbeaten until the twilight of his career when he was narrowly outfought by both Mate Parlov and Matthew Saad Muhammad, Conteh may not have been so lucky had he hooked up with either Victor Galindez or Foster, but by the time he was stopped for the first time in his career in the rematch with Muhammad, he had already guaranteed himself a place among the greatest and the best light-heavyweights in history.

    JOEY MAXIM (82-29-4)
    A grim persistence on the inside combined with a technical surety on the outside, an iron jaw and staid discipline saw Joey Maxim carve out one of boxing’s most underrated careers.

    Maxim was the champion of the world at light-heavyweight, coming to the title in 1951, ten long, hard years after he turned professional. He was never going to hold it long with Archie Moore lurking in the brutal shadows of the murderer’s row, but Maxim should be credited for tackling the universally ducked Moore in the first place – and for the work he did in the division before Moore reached him.

    He took the title from Freddie Mills who reportedly lost three teeth and never boxed again as Maxim jabbed and hooked him into retirement. Not a puncher, his unerring consistency, accuracy and a persistence born of great durability and strength of character could nevertheless inflict severe suffering on all but the very best opponents. Certainly he had been too much for Gus Lesnevich, dominating him over fifteen rounds eight months earlier as he was for favourite Bob Murphy in his first title defence.

    His third defence was far and away his most famous fight, Maxim defeating Sugar Ray Robinson in thirteen rounds as the middleweight champion of the world quit in appalling conditions, the heat in the ring said to be over one-hundred degrees Fahrenheit. Maxim never received credit for this win – Robinson weighed in as a middleweight, and the heat rather than Maxim was perceived as Robinson’s chief foe (Robinson himself naming the source of his defeat as God himself, perhaps demonstrating the kind of self-belief necessary to blaze a trail from lightweight all the way to light-heavyweight). This is perhaps a little unfair. As Maxim remarked, “did people think I had air conditioning in my corner?” It was a victory for durability and size but it was a victory none the less, for all that it is a difficult one to judge. I’ve treated it here as a successful defence against a dangerous but unranked opponent. Robinson was certainly that, taking the lion’s share of the rounds before he was pulled.

    Then Moore came calling and Maxim’s time at the top was over. Maxim wasn’t so much out-classed by Moore as seemingly incapable of winning rounds, many of which were close but almost all of which seemed to be controlled by The Mongoose. Maxim fought Moore three times and at no time recorded a win.

    Outside of those title fights, Maxim’s best wins at the weight were likely over Nate Bolden and the wonderful if inexperienced Floyd Patterson but Maxim spent so little time actually boxing against light-heavyweights at light-heavyweight that he must even so rank in the thirties, rather lower than I expected to see him. Any Maxim fans who are disappointed in this could do a lot worse than to track down my heavyweight list, where Maxim’s ranking is surprisingly high.
     
  2. McGrain

    McGrain Diamond Dog Staff Member

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    This content is protected


    This content is protected
     
  3. Reinhardt

    Reinhardt Boxing Addict Full Member

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  4. Reinhardt

    Reinhardt Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Very tough fight to call, I went with Maxim but am not confident at all
     
  5. robert ungurean

    robert ungurean Богдан Full Member

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    I'm a big fan of Contehs skill set. Beautiful fighter to watch in his prime. I'm going with him by UD
     
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  6. George Crowcroft

    George Crowcroft 'Snarky Little Gobshite' - IntentionalButt Full Member

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    I think in a technical battle, a battle of wits, the constant and wonderful jab of Conteh makes the difference. We'd know almost exactly how this fight would go if Maxim had fought Johnson, or if Conteh fought Fourie. Two matches which represent the opponent quite well, which didn't happen. Shame, really. Especially Maxim-Johnson.

    Conteh UD, for me.
     
  7. Fergy

    Fergy Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    I like Conteh by decision.
     
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  8. Noel857

    Noel857 I Am Duran Full Member

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    Conteh on points
     
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  9. George Crowcroft

    George Crowcroft 'Snarky Little Gobshite' - IntentionalButt Full Member

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    Colour me ****less. I knew Conteh was popular on here, but I thought I'd be the outlier :lol:
     
  10. AwardedSteak863

    AwardedSteak863 Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Same here. I thought most would be going for Joey.
     
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  11. JohnThomas1

    JohnThomas1 Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    Conteh by points is the reasonable conclusion for me. Extremely talented fighter and i think he matches nicely against Maxim.
     
  12. McGrain

    McGrain Diamond Dog Staff Member

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    John Conteh cantered to a unanimous decision win, running the fight with his left hand and tattooing Maxim with his right through the eleventh and twelfth. Maxim was struggling badly at that point and his corner was threatening to pull him, but Conteh injured his right and jabbed his way through the championship rounds to take a unanimous decision having hardly dropped a round.

    Maxim said he was "embarrassed" and "might as well have just **** himself."

    The official cards read 15-0, 14-1, and, somehow, 16-0.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2021