The best version of Floyd Mayweather versus the best version of Tommy Hearns

Discussion in 'Classic Boxing Forum' started by ThatOne, Jan 22, 2023.

Who wins

  1. Floyd

    5 vote(s)
    6.5%
  2. Tommy

    72 vote(s)
    93.5%
  1. JohnThomas1

    JohnThomas1 Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    For sure. Sometimes that can happen to them for any amount of reasons.
     
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  2. NoNeck

    NoNeck Pugilist Specialist Full Member

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    You sound overly emotional.

    Ask Mayweather's opponents if he punched hard and was physically strong. They all say the same thing.

    Yes, Mayweather was good at taking jabs away from opponents.
     
  3. J Jones

    J Jones Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Not sure what it means to "bump a Marquez-Mayweather thread." Please explain.

    Also not sure what you mean by saying I attempted to "rewrite history." Again, please explain.

    Objectively speaking, I remember three (3) occasions where Floyd adapted to adversity. He had one scary moment in the Mosley fight, courtesy of a big right hand. He adapted to Judah's speed. He made Oscar abandon his jab from round 7 on.

    You're absolutely right about "Mayweather never needing to be Leonard." A few FACTS about why that was the case:

    Odds for Mayweather fights; he was the betting favorite in every fight:

    -400 vs Gatti
    -500 vs Judah
    -190 vs Oscar
    -360 vs Marquez
    -400 vs Mosely
    -700 vs Cotto
    -300 vs Canelo
    -900 and -600 vs Maidana
    -200 vs Pacquiao
    -350 vs McGregor

    Odds for Leonard fights:
    On the day of the fight, Hearns was a 7-5 favorite.
    On the day of the fight, Hagler was a 3-1 favorite.

    Once again, I see no way that Floyd could have dealt with Hearns. In fact, I doubt he would've signed a contract to fight him.
     
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  4. NoNeck

    NoNeck Pugilist Specialist Full Member

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    He was an underdog for Corrales, which you conveniently left off. After that, he was favored in all fights because of how good he was and how popular he became. But if the odds had been accurate, he would’ve taken several loses because that’s what the math would’ve dictated. In hindsight, he should’ve been given much wider odds.

    I hope you understand that being a favorite means that you’re perceived as being the fighter more people will bet on, not that the opponent is bad.
     
  5. Cobra33

    Cobra33 Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Mayweather punched hard at welterweight now? So name the welterweights he knocked out.
     
  6. NoNeck

    NoNeck Pugilist Specialist Full Member

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    There’s something to be said for Canelo respecting your power and then going on to have a trench warfare fight with GGG.
     
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  7. Cobra33

    Cobra33 Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Thats what I thought. He didnt hit hard.
     
  8. SgrRyLeonard

    SgrRyLeonard Active Member Full Member

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    He was actually a 6-5 favorite when he stepped into the ring for Corrales.
     
  9. NoNeck

    NoNeck Pugilist Specialist Full Member

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    You know I'm right.
     
  10. NoNeck

    NoNeck Pugilist Specialist Full Member

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    Late money came in for Corrales.
     
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  11. Flash24

    Flash24 Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Mayweather only appears so skilled because his
    competition, though some have name recognition
    has been so average at best.
    All the names he get's credit for beating at
    welter and above were well past prime, and
    damaged goods (Delohoya
    Mosley, Cotto, Judah, J.Marquez who was
    also well above his best fighting weight)
    Fighters like Hatton and Alvarez that were
    simply overrated .
    What's really telling is none of his welter
    weight opponents with the exception of
    Alvarez (Who's taken the smoke and mirrors
    idea from May Jr and ran with it)
    had six or more wins after he faced
    them. most were at the win one
    lose one stage that indicate they were
    past their primes. That in itself tells the story of
    where the vast majority of his opponents
    were in their careers.......
     
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  12. J Jones

    J Jones Well-Known Member Full Member

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    You forgot to mention that Hearns hung the first loss on Virgil Hill, who had an awesome jab, by outboxing him.
     
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  13. Dynamicpuncher

    Dynamicpuncher Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Yeah I don't understand when people say that honestly. Jones entered the P4P rankings in 1993, and then stayed there consistently until 2003. And was often ranked P4P number 1 for almost a decade, with a 49-1 record before his first legit loss at 35 years old. If that's not longevity I don't know what is, it's not that Jones didn't have longevity It's actually the opposite, he carried on too long and should've retired after Ruiz or Tarver 1.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2023
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  14. surfinghb

    surfinghb Boxing Addict Full Member

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    what i dont get is you never see anyone here match a 2010 Pac with Hearns, SRL, Duran, Hagler, etc.. No one does it .. and he's the one that would take ALL the fights !!!! Didnt anyone follow his career !! He wouldn't waffle like Pryor did , He would get in there with Ray! . I never match Pac with them because I'm realistic about it ,,
    BUT again he's the one that takes all the fights !! .. imo
     
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  15. J Jones

    J Jones Well-Known Member Full Member

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    According to this link, Floyd walked to the ring versus Corrales as a 6-to-5 favorite. Plus, if you reread my original post without "Floyd blinders," you'll see that I said the following about Corrales:

    "Corrales was the only opponent whom objective and knowledgeable boxing fans picked to beat Floyd. Corrales was a legit badass the night he lost to Floyd."

    FYI, I also chose Corrales to beat Floyd. In hindsight, I can safely say that Corrales lacked the boxing skills required to ever beat Floyd.

    As others have mentioned, Hearns could outbox good boxers (Leonard, Benitez, Virgil Hill) and deliver fight-ending KOs (Cuevas, Shuler, Duran).

    I understand how odds work. Sportsbooks set the line to encourage the most action. I also understand why Mayweather was the favorite in all of his fights, including versus Corrales.

    Not really sure what you mean by the following: "if the odds had been accurate, he would have taken several losses because that's what the math would have dictated."

    In hindsight, giving Mayweather wider odds would've required Sportsbooks to be negligent in their job, which is to set the line to encourage the most "action."

    Bottom line is that Mayweather never took the risks that Leonard did versus Hearns and Hagler...FACT!
     
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