the what fights did you watch today\scorecard thread.

Discussion in 'Classic Boxing Forum' started by Mantequilla, Nov 20, 2009.

  1. McGrain

    McGrain Diamond Dog Staff Member

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    I don't. I should. I'd go so far to say that about 80 percent of them are in this thread and nowhere else.
     
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  2. McGrain

    McGrain Diamond Dog Staff Member

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    What a ****.
     
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  3. George Crowcroft

    George Crowcroft 'Snarky Little Gobshite' - IntentionalButt Full Member

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    :lol:
     
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  4. Bujia

    Bujia Active Member Full Member

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    I don’t even write them down as I watch, usually. If I bother to score (which I should do more of) the fight at all. Just keep a tally in my head as the rounds go by and that’s it. My memory provides the basics when called upon.
     
  5. Jel

    Jel Reserving the right to be inconsistent Full Member

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    That's weird - I thought 'genius' would show up with more than four letters and wouldn't be blanked out.
     
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  6. Jel

    Jel Reserving the right to be inconsistent Full Member

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    Juan Manuel Marquez v Marco Antonio Barrera

    Inspired by the 'love' shown for my scorecard nerdism, I thought I'd post another one here.

    This was one of those fights that was highly competitive but wide on the scorecards. If I hadn't been acttively scoring it, my impression would be a very close decision that could go either way. As it was, Marquez won enough rounds clearly over the second half to pull away on all three cards.

    No doubt about the key moment of the fight - the KD in round 7 that was never called. Barrera was an idiot and all he had to do was take a step back and let Jay Nady count - god knows why he stepped in with that punch when Marquez was clearly grounded. That round had a potential 4 point swing. I personally would have made it a 10-9 to Barrera had the KD been counted as Marquez was having a brilliant round up to that point but I suspect that the judges would have made it 10-8 his way and that would have made things a lot closer on at least 2 of the cards.

    Still, the right guy won. Would have been a very close fight had it happened at featherweight a few years earlier though - not sure who I'd favour in that scenario.

    1 10-9 (good opener)
    2 9-10
    3 9-10
    4 9-10 (close)
    5 10-9
    6 10-9
    7 10-8 (big round for Marquez - winning the round clearly and then Barrera has a point taken for a foul, which was idiotic as he'd just scored a legit knockdown)
    8 9-10 (close)
    9 10-9
    10 10-9
    11 10-9
    12 10-9 (close)

    Marquez 116-111 Barrera
     
  7. Bujia

    Bujia Active Member Full Member

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    7th round 10-8 for Marquez? If you’d have scored it 10-9 for Barrera without the deduction, then wouldn’t it be 10-9 for Marquez with?
     
  8. Jel

    Jel Reserving the right to be inconsistent Full Member

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    No, with the knockdown the score would usually be an automatic 10-8 to Barrera but because Marquez was doing well in the round before the KD, I would only make it 10-9 Barrera.

    As it was, the knockdown didn't get counted and Barrera was deducted a point for hitting Marquez when he was down. Marquez was winning the round up to that point and with the point deduction that makes it 10-8 Marquez. All three judges had that score too.
     
  9. Bujia

    Bujia Active Member Full Member

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    Gotcha. I remember that part well. I didn’t recall that the knockdown wasn’t counted, though. It was clear as day.
     
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  10. NickChristo

    NickChristo Member Full Member

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    Ezzard Charles - Joey Maxim
    Round 1 - 9-10
    Round 2 - 10-9
    Round 3 - 10-9
    Round 4 - 10-9
    Round 5 - 10-9
    Round 6 - 10-9
    Round 7 - 9-10
    Round 8 - 9-10
    Round 9 - 10-9
    Round 10 - 10-9
    Round 11 - 10-9
    Round 12 - 10-9

    Only 12 rounds on the footage (?), Maxim shone in the rounds he won but otherwise Charles was the busier man and landing the more effective punches. Worth a view for Charles' brilliance.
     
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  11. Jel

    Jel Reserving the right to be inconsistent Full Member

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    Oh yeah, it was a knockdown, no doubt. At first glance I didn't see Barrera land the punch while Marquez was down and wondered why Nady was deducting a point from Barrera rather than counting over Marquez but then it was absolutely clear on the replay.

    I'm generally not a fan of Jay Nady and it could be argued that he should have directed Barrera to a neutral corner quicker but once the illegal blow landed he was absolutely right to waive the KD and deduct a point. He could have actually DQ'ed Barrera for that, really.
     
  12. Jel

    Jel Reserving the right to be inconsistent Full Member

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    Erik Morales v Daniel Zaragoza

    A scrappy but entertaining fight - the aging warrior Zaragoza gave everything but he was in there with a fighter who was younger, just as tough as him and well... better than him too.

    Round 8 was where the fight swung firmly in Morales' favour as he gave Zaragoza a beating. The old warrior hung tough but it was only delaying the inevitable. The start of a new era in Mexican boxing that would include Barrera and eventually Marquez too.

    1 10-9
    2 9-10 (close)
    3 9-10 (close)
    4 10-9
    5 9-10
    6 10-9
    7 9-10 (close)
    8 10-9 (big round for El Terrible - conceivably a two point margin - he's firmly turned the fight his way now)
    9 10-9
    10 10-8 (Zaragoza down but his warrior's heart won't let him quit)
    (106-101)
    11 Morales KO Zaragoza
     
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  13. McGrain

    McGrain Diamond Dog Staff Member

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    Nkosinathi Joyi UD12 Katsunari Takayama

    Absolutely bizarre first round. Takayama comes hurtling out of the corner and seems to hurt Joyi, but in a clash of kneecaps :lol: Joyi literally clutches him to his chest in a vice-like grip refusing to budge - Takayama looks pleadingly at the referee who just shrugs. This fight is being fought in Joyi country. The South African has his jab going by round's end. Ring-card girls tower over the fighters :lol:

    The mission for Joyi is clear and it's to walk Takayama down and control when the exchanges occur. Right now that's Takayama doing that, but Joyi has good footwork nd is very good to the body - he should be up to this. Visually I'm enjoying this, because Joyi walks Takayama down then when the fight, it's often Joyi who is backing up. But he is making good room for his punches, hitting Tkayama with hard lefts to the face. i like it a lot. Great third too, Takayama staying closer, on his toes, throwing many punches, Joyi a bit startled, misses a bit more than in the second. That might be the key here, how off-balance Takayama can keep Joyi. Interestingly the commentary (SA) has the opposite, they have Takayama missing and Takayama confused.

    Joyi has done as good a job tracking Takayama down as anyone I know though, really. He hits him often in the final 70 seconds of the fourth. He sends Takayama around the ring a bit in the fifth and even forces him to take a brief knee. Takayama responds in the sixth slinging right hands from way outside, very straight ones a little closer, looking for a big punch. Great atmosphere incidentally, with loads of cool singing as an added bonus. This looks like a bit of a stiffening in the sixth, JOyi landing hard punches at will, fighting Takayama, who has a great jaw, to a standstill. Takayama even comes boxing back after Joyi has gassed a bit and they exchanges more hard punches in the corner. Takayama was just never in a bad fight really.

    Takayama doing some wild Ali shuffles in the ring, so much fun, ends with him trapped in a corner momentarily in the ninth though. Joyi had a good senveth and eighth, but he is firmly out-hit in the ninth and looks like he may be a little tired. He's not what you'd call economical after all. Joyi just found him early with key punches and never really let him off the hook. H knew where he was except when he out- and-out ran and even then he know he would be coming back. A very good fight.

    Joyi:2,4,5*,6,7,9,11,12.
    Takayama:1,3,8,10.

    116-111 Joyi.
     
  14. scartissue

    scartissue Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Today I watched the 4th bout between 'Chillin' Charley Riley and Glen Flanagan. And...it was a disappointment. I loved seeing Riley's bout with Sandy Saddler and I really liked his swarming/pressure style, but he looked terrible this time around. And no wonder. He was at the tail end of his career and that style doesn't bode well for longevity. He just looked like a spent fighter. This was '53 and it looked to me on his record that he may have peaked between '47-'50. Anyways, it is what it is. Fought in the Eastern Parkway Arena with NY's rounds basis.

    Round 1: Riley
    Round 2: Even
    Round 3: Riley
    Round 4: Flanagan
    Round 5: Flanagan
    Round 6: Flanagan
    Round 7: Flanagan (Riley penalized for repeated low blows)
    Round 8: Flanagan
    Round 9: Flanagan
    Round 10: Flanagan

    Total: 7-2-1 Flanagan (actual scores: 7-3, 7-3 and 6-3-1 all for Flanagan)

    Once Flanagan found the range with a left uppercut that couldn't miss Riley, and then established his jab, there was no turning back. Incidentally, that 7th round penalization is always a bit funny in NY rules. The round is simply taken from one fighter and given to the other. But in the case where the fighter incurring the damage wins the round anyway, nothing is deducted. A bit archaic compared to the 10 point must system, but there you have it. BTW, I would not recommend this fight.
     
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  15. McGrain

    McGrain Diamond Dog Staff Member

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    Katsunari Takayama UD12 Mario Rodriguez

    The biggest win of Takayama's career. Takayama travelled extensively in his storied career and here to Mexico to face the best puncher of the 105lbs era. Rodriguez could bang and proved it when he knocked the number two puncher of the era the **** out in seven. Takayama clearly respects Mario's power and is firmly on his bike. Bags him the first two but Mario knows the first two isn't in his wheelhouse and that they were never going to win those rounds. His plan bares fruit in the third when Mario, who had sounded more than one warning in the second, with either hand, puts his head down (much like he did against Joyi, in the fourth I think it was) and tries to reach Takayama's chest while throwing meathooks. Lefts to the body, a very hard straight ab are the defining punches of the first half of the round. Takayama, who hates losing rounds, tries to out-fight him but is actually caught when he decides that's a bad idea - a wide left hook sends him sprawling to the canvas. The minutes that follow are the key to the fight.

    Takayama meets the excitement of Mario's new pressure with a tight circle and a jab which matures in turn into a right hand to the body. He abandons the fuselage and looks to score technically sure punches while staying mobile. It's perfect strategy in the circumstances and puts Takayama back in control after the scare. In the final forty seconds he goes back to volume swarming and although he gets clipped, looks comfy once more. He thrashes Mario in the sixth.

    Mario at 105lbs had one of the best chins in the sport, of course and was unaffected by Takayama's feather-fisted attacks. He bags the seventh with a savage body attack and in tandem with the KD, this actually keeps him firmly in touch with the fight. Worse, Takayama suffers a cut out front in the eighth, hard to know if it is a punch or a head clash, they're both dipped low for many body-exchanges. Takyama wins the eighth but it has a cost - he emerges from it with cuts from both eyes. He's so good at the two-piece Tkayama, just a striaght-handed two-piece pair, straight punches down the pipe, well balanced, the one right behind the other. Head clashes caused those cuts. Clearly discomforted by them, Takayama ships some hurt in the ninth.

    10, 11 and 12 though, are Takayama's wheelhouse. He almost always sees them and his absurd engine means he almost always profits there. He sees home a really exciting fight. God bless Takayama, he's just not in bad ones.

    Takayama:1,2,4,5,6,8,10,11.
    Rodriguez:3*,7,9,12.

    115-112 Takayama.
     
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