Tips for sparring 30 pd bigger southpaw..

Discussion in 'Boxing Training' started by Primenal, Apr 9, 2013.

  1. Primenal

    Primenal Boxing Addict Full Member

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    I've been training for quite a few years now. Haven't really sparred in quite a while though. About 2 months ago this cop from my gym invites me to a gym to box. I'm 5'6 170.. lift weights, feel i'm strong in my own right, and box about 3x a week (heavybag, shadow boxing, speedbag, mits, etc). He's about 5'8-5'9 200 pds, a small tank basically.
    I was working mits with him and noticed he was slow, but threw big time looping shots of course. I made the mistake of over training that day, and then we spar. I wore head gear, he wore no head gear. I jabbed him well, moved, etc. The head gear put me a big disadvantage I learned when he landed a huge straight left on me through the head gear (didn't see it) and busted my nose within about a minute..
    We continued sparring for the entire 3 minutes though, basically with me working my jab, and him throwing hayemakers. I was to wore out, and not used to sparring enough for 3 minutes to be willing to FIGHT him... Though since he's bigger and less skilled dunno if that'd be the wisest thing for me regardless.

    Since then I've gotten my cardio up, went nothing but 3 minute rounds on the heavy bag, feel sharper, etc.
    Were suppose to spar again this thursday. I know I should move.. I made the mistake last time of moving to the right (in to his big left) cuz I didn't realize he was southpaw.
    I'm not going to wear head gear cuz he doesn't, and although I may take a bigger punch, at least I'll see it coming. Tips on how to do well against him? His movement is actually pretty good.. He's good at knowing when to come in to throw, and when to move out. Is it better to step to him so he can't throw looping punches as much, or should I use my skill, speed, and constantly move?
     
  2. Bogotazo

    Bogotazo Amateur Full Member

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    I had the same problem facing a big, quick, southpaw heavyweight who had some 40 pounds on me. Not fun, in this case he was more skilled and experience than I was and still took liberties on my face. The most success I had was when I stayed low and weaved in to land from down low, they can't quite see what you're throwing from that angle and it protects you from his punches coming from a higher angle. I usually circled to the left to get my lead foot outside, I didn't get hit with too many straight lefts, but because I'm used to fighting tall I always ran into the right hook when coming in. Using my lead hand to parry might have helped but I wasn't used to that. Stay low, keep your legs fresh so they don't tire, circle both ways, feint, and either make him reach or get real close. No-man's land is where he'll have the most success.
     
  3. KillSomething

    KillSomething Boxing Junkie Full Member

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  4. Primenal

    Primenal Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Thanks. Sounds like great tips. At least he's less skilled in my situation.
     
  5. Primenal

    Primenal Boxing Addict Full Member

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    LOL I knew somebody would post that, and would say that makes sense. I know boxing has weight divisions for a reason, and he doesn't exactly wish to do friendly sparring. It's a bit of a pride thing after the last time I sparred him, but honestly besides him busting my nose, it was a pretty even match. I've definitely improved since then, and he hasn't even boxed since then..
     
  6. Bogotazo

    Bogotazo Amateur Full Member

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    This is the best advice to be honest.
     
  7. DS-Southpaw

    DS-Southpaw New Member Full Member

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    I AM a bigger southpaw. And occasionally spar smaller guys when there's no-one of my height/weight. I'm 6'4" (1m94) and 220 lbs (100kg).

    The smaller guys are usually quicker (I'm rather fast for a heavyweight though), so our situations seem rather similar.

    Things that I have most trouble dealing with are speedy in- and out fighters. Make sure you keep jabbing and when he throws a jab back slip to your left and throw a cross.

    Try to keep circling to your left and keep your lead foot outside of his. This'll make it harder for him to throw the left (his power hand). Occasionally start stepping to your right to make him throw the left. When he does he'll probably over-commit (because your circling to the left the entire time makes him not trust his reach) you can then slip to the outside and throw the hardest straight right you can.

    One thing us southpaws have on orthodox fighters is we're used to sword-fighting with your jab. You can try to catch the jab with your left and throw your right (touch and shoot) or even keep your left up to high (to bait him into jabbing) and slap his jab down (LIGHTLY! Don't get yourself in trouble when he feints) and step in with a stiff jab.

    Good luck, mate :)
     
  8. CHAL_DIESEL

    CHAL_DIESEL GOAT Full Member

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    Keep a high wide guard, use head movement, move to your right and get
    On the outside of his foot. Boxing 101
     
  9. Bogotazo

    Bogotazo Amateur Full Member

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    Left man, left.
     
  10. jasper2005

    jasper2005 Active Member Full Member

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    lol
     
  11. KillSomething

    KillSomething Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    I'll go against conventional wisdom and say keep some range and circle toward his power hand. You can always change up with a step left suddenly when he leads. I have much better success doing this against southpaws--they often aren't used to moving that direction, and they think you're making a mistake which draws their lead.

    Sergio is a southpaw who moves toward the power hand more often than not. Nothing more boring than watching a southpaw-orthodox matchup where they jockey for outside position. Make them circle the wrong way and then step around them to your left to land. Ward was doing this to Dawson quite a bit. Lots of times he'd have to actually step over Dawson's leg. You can land your jab and a short hook very nicely by stepping inside their lead leg. Outside the leg is good for a straight right but it's what they expect anyway.
     
  12. CHAL_DIESEL

    CHAL_DIESEL GOAT Full Member

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    Yea sorry, I'm a south paw, so I move to the right that's the dumbass I have in me coming out. I meant to say to his left. Kind of like when some coaches tells, "throw your right hand", "oh **** we mean left".
     
  13. CHAL_DIESEL

    CHAL_DIESEL GOAT Full Member

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    One thing also a lot of southpaws typically **** there head a tiny bit to the right quite often. If this is the case with your dancing partner, throw UR right hand where u think he will be next.
     
  14. Primenal

    Primenal Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Awesome advice. As long as he's still going tonight I'll implement it in to my gameplan. When I used to spar I was a bit wreckless and aggressive, but this will be good for me. I'll have to use and stick to a gameplan. War with a much bigger, less skilled guy would be stupid for me to get involved in.
    Seems like all he really had was that big left (not much of a right hook) so think I'm just going to continue to circle away from it. Keep touching him and circling. I'll see how fraustrated and tired I can make him.
    It'd be great if he just threw with decent power and we could both get some good work in, but I'm not counting on it.
     
  15. Primenal

    Primenal Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Wow! I just got done boxing his head off... Amazing how well a game plan you stick to works. I was a bit nervous of course (not as bad as I thought I'd be), my whole plan was to NEVER STAY STATIONARY. Punch, or move was my only 2 options. The first three minutes I dont think he hit me 5 times while I was popping off the jab, landing an occasional right, and when he ducked I'd throw an uppercut. Hit him with a big one either round 1 or 2.
    We sparred probably 4 rounds, and he rarely hit me with a big left. After the first or second round I noticed he kept switching because I was fraustrating him, and I'd just move the other way Lol. Wish I'd have gotten videos for you guys.
    The 4th round he hit me good to the body though, and I gave him a pretty good one back and MOVED, and he started to go down, and I was thinking WTF? He layed down in extrme pain, his calf went in to a spasm from chasing me! Never seen such a tough guy in so much pain so the guy who was basically trying to bust me up a couple months ago.. Now I'm faced with being the big guy and rubbing the cramp out of his calf..
    Overall I'm pretty proud of myself. Stuck to the game plan, took a few punches but never got away from it, and in the end I get a chance to show sportsmanship and respect to this guy I felt never respected me that much before...
    Thanks for all the advice again guys!