Upcoming prospect

Discussion in 'Boxing Training' started by MMayhemM, May 13, 2020.


  1. MMayhemM

    MMayhemM New Member Full Member

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    As a upcoming prospect now, unable to sell much tickets, should one be signing with a promoter like Goodwin who requires you to sell an average of 60 tickets to BREAK EVEN. Which is madness, many fighters have their fights cancelled due to the lack of tickets that they sell. This money of course goes out to pay the opponent (Journeyman cost roughly £1200) and other boxing costs. However, as a UK fighter what stops me from fighting abroad like in countries with cheaper opponents such as Hungary, Latvia in Europe and Egypt, Tanzania and Ghana in Africa etc. How much do the journeyman cost over there ? Anyone have a clue. The pro game seems to be literally nothing more but a business and I want to have a clue as to what im entering as I have been an amateur for a while
     
  2. Saintpat

    Saintpat Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    First off, whether you’re a prospect or not depends upon what kind of potential others see in you.

    And no promoter is going to sign you to a deal (where they provide X fights in X period of time with a guaranteed purse structure) if you’re not a prospect.

    You need to find a manager. If no manager will work with you, you need to figure out why that is — not talented enough, are you difficult, do you need more amateur experience, etc.?

    A promoter has use, basically, for fighters who fall into three categories:

    1) Prospects who are signed with the promoter — these are investments: the promoter signs the fighter, promotes his fights, tries to build his record and get him to the level of contender or champion and make money

    2) Fighters who can sell tickets — this is pretty obvious; maybe there’s a local guy in whatever city the promoter is putting on a card who is not a big prospect but he can bring in 150-200 fans who will pay to see that fighter fight; you want that guy on your card if you’re promoting, and you will probably want to put him against an opponent he’s likely to beat if you plan to promote there again so you can keep and build his audience and have him on future cards.

    3) Opponents — the guys you bring in to fight those in categories 1 and 2: these are fighters who the promoter expects to put on a good effort but hopefully not knock off his coveted prospect(s) and local draws.

    Maybe, sometimes in some places, the promoter has room on the card to make a fight or two where he doesn’t care who wins, he just needs a good fight. He’ll probably use that spot to do a favor for a friend and let him put one of his fighters against someone in a 50/50 kind of fight where he pays both sides the going rate. (Some of the best fights I’ve seen on club shows have been two opponents with losing records going head to head — because they don’t often get to fight against someone who isn’t a lot better and they relish the chance to win.)

    Which of these three categories do you best fit? If you had a promoter, you wouldn’t be asking, so it’s 2 or 3. And if you can’t sell tickets, the promoter probably only has use for you to fight as an opponent.

    Your manager will have a clue. He’ll show you how it works. He’ll try to find the best possible fights for you. He’s try to hook you up with a promoter. That’s why you need a manager.

    Yes, professional boxing is a business. It’s not a hobby. It’s not a charity. The promoter is putting his money on the line when he promotes a show and wants to make a profit (or at least not lose too much). The question is why he would pay you and the ‘journeyman’ (which I describe as an opponent) and probably hotel and food for both fighters and their corners and some travel money, etc., if you can’t even persuade your own friends to come see you fight?

    If someone is able to sell enough tickets to pay himself and his opponent, the promoter can’t lose money on that fight.

    That’s how it works.

    I hope that helps.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2020
    greynotsoold likes this.
  3. MMayhemM

    MMayhemM New Member Full Member

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    Thank you for your response, im currently still an amateur and have not made the transition but was trying to get an insight before turning over. I have seen some fighters from the UK build a record abroad in other countries against lower tier opponents then have a title shot at the IBO world title but I wonder how they have done that when they can't sell tickets abroad.
     
  4. Saintpat

    Saintpat Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    That’s an investment by a promoter (and possibly also by the manager): they are banking that by spending that money building up the fighter that he will reach a level where he will get big purses as a world champ or high-level contender, allowing them to make their investment back and more ... or that he will become a major champion who can get a big TV deal or even make it to PPV level to generate income that will make that investment worthwhile.

    I’ve known a couple of guys along the way who self-invested and ‘bought their own wins’ — paying a promoter his opponent’s purse allowing him to get wins on promoters’ shows to build their own record up. To the last one they were just feeding their egos so they could have a shiny record and maybe win a minor title (like an IBA regional title or something) and tell everyone they are a big/bad championship boxer. But they don’t want to do that with the idea of fighting top fighters for big purses — they don’t want to ever lose, just to ‘buy’ the glory of being able to say they’re a successful boxer.

    You need to talk to your amateur coach about locating a manager and then reach a deal with that manager to launch a pro career. And you need to listen to what they tell you — they know the business.
     


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