Victor Conte: “Morning running, road work and high altitude training is stupid and useless”

Discussion in 'Boxing Training' started by Gennady, Oct 26, 2018.



  1. PaddyGarcia

    PaddyGarcia #IrrationalGarcia Full Member

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    I think we all underestimated him in that regard. But when it comes down to it, (to my mind at least) GGG is a boxer before anything else, so it didn't shock me to see him take that avenue. But yeah Canelo showed balls no doubt.

    Good call. Usyk's stamina became very clear to me in the Hunter fight. He went all in in the 12th
     
  2. dealt_with

    dealt_with Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    It is nonsense, you shouldn't train in high altitude unless you're competing at high altitude. Altitude reduces training quality/intensity, that's why the established way of using altitude is to train-low sleep-high. You should not train in altitude unless you're trying to lose high end fitness.
     
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  3. dealt_with

    dealt_with Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Anybody with any understanding at all of human physiology knows that roadwork is next to useless for a boxer, in most cases it is more harmful than helpful. This doesn't need to be said by Conte, this isn't news.
     
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  4. jmashyaka

    jmashyaka Boxing Addict Full Member

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    I think he is a pressure fighter at his best except for an very good jab, GGG isn’t a very fluid boxer, when you look at how Jacobs and Canelo were able to counter him and hit with combos, GGG relies heavily on the jab. Of course he has one of the most active and best jab in the game though, very good subtle defence at time.

    Usyk almost murdered Hunter in the 10th (I think) and Hunter survived somehow, that’s what made me confident he would beat Bakole.
     
  5. Jake_Lamotta

    Jake_Lamotta Member Full Member

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    Not disputing these claims but what would you put instead of road work?
    Slightly off topic but do you think a high aerobic base is important?
     
  6. dealt_with

    dealt_with Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Not at all, boxers aren’t primarily aerobic athletes. Their Vo2max is generally in the range of 50-70ml/kg/min, that’s nothing extreme and certainly nothing you’d need an aerobic base for. Those numbers are largely determined by your genetics so there isn’t that much scope for change. More important is the glycolytic system, maintaining a high percentage of that maximal aerobic capacity. Working in a range that is producing a lot of lactic acid will promote adaptations that are relevant to the bioenergetics of boxing.
    Repeat sprints for boxing, particularly repeat sprints in a boxing context as that will have the most transfer across to boxing performance, funnily enough.
     
  7. Jake_Lamotta

    Jake_Lamotta Member Full Member

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    Thanks for the reply!
    Always liked what you preach in this forum!

    In regards to strength training how strong does one need to be?
    What are your though to conjugate training for athletes? Thanks.
     
  8. dealt_with

    dealt_with Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    Strong enough. For different people that's going to be different, for people with shorter limbs it becomes more important to be strong, to compensate for the relative lack of impulse that is able to be generated. If you're fast but not powerful then you'll get a lot out of even a little bit of strength.
    What exactly do you mean by conjugate training? Regardless of the program you're doing there should always be qualities that are being trained that aren't the current primary focus. However I think it's evident that phase potentiation is important, and conjugate training doesn't really take advantage of that in the way that linear training does. In a sport where strength isn't the be all and end all I think there's nothing wrong with conjugate style training. I think it's also important not to get too wrapped in systems and programs, every individual has certain needs and can gain more from more of a focus in an area than in another area. Every program should be maintaining secondary physical qualities, so every good linear program is still a conjugate program to an extent.
     

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