When you cant train boxing anymore

Discussion in 'Boxing Training' started by Dane86, Apr 25, 2021.

  1. Dane86

    Dane86 New Member Full Member

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    Hi guys.

    8 years ago I had 2 severe concussions and had to stop boxing. Since then I haven't been motivated to do anything physical, and starting a new sport at age 35 is not really a viable option. What did you guys do when you retired/stopped boxing training ?
     
  2. Kratos

    Kratos Well-Known Member Full Member

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    You can still train in boxing, just don’t spar.
     
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  3. George forearm

    George forearm The forearm of George Full Member

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    I'm still active but when the gyms were closed because of covid I obviously couldn't box. I kept my self active by lifting and running.
     
  4. Surrix

    Surrix Boxing Addict Full Member

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    There are a lot of things to do for fun besides boxing.
    If you train boxing, better don't spar.
    35 you should more think how to improve in field where you might earn for a living.
     
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  5. Devon Dog

    Devon Dog Member Full Member

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    Im going to respectfully disagree
    Im knocking on but still train most days I gave my business 100% in the last 30 years but always made sure I trained . running , core training , weights bit of shadow boxing . I do a bit of hill walking with my wife but she is faster than me in that game :):)

    If the OP put all his effort into his daily craft he may ignore what he would really like to do and this would have long term health effects

    I have seen many people do well but F### me First they look like fat b##### behind the wheel of a 70 grand car and second they have heart attacks in their 50s

    There is more to life than money and if the OP whats to get out there he should :yaay
     
  6. ecto55

    ecto55 להחזיר את ממלכת דוד Full Member

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    Do what clever people without other options end up doing post-boxing...live vicariously through younger people as their trainer or coach. Its great fun, if you set them on-course properly you are 'the' decision-maker, you get to pull the strings in just about all facets of their life from afar (q- do think she's the one for me; a- no mate, i just don't think she supports you in your boxing enough, punt her), you also stay relevant and involved in the sport (how else are you going too?) and maintain a purpose for yourself (beats staring at the walls), you can also take the credit (or a good deal of it) for any successes that happen irrespective of how much input you actually had and yet if things go pear-shaped (as they can do, badly) you can just say 'the kid had no goddamn chin' or 'no-one who does their roadwork gases that early', kick 'em to the curb and find a new 'protege'. If you don't know what the hell your doing, don't worry, you'll be all right, just throw a towel over your shoulder, buy a big of vaso and off you go. You can even make some good coin out of it if you're smart and remember, it'll never be your own schnoz getting smashed in. No corner-man ever got a subdural hematoma. If your life lacks sufficient alternative outlets, distractions or even a purpose, you can even do this for decades and end up being given awards, community recognition and by some twits, a degree of veneration. They only remember the champs, no lists were made about trainers / coaches and all the fighters they had that now can only walk on their heels, are broken mentally or can't turn a doorknob. There's not many other ways to get young, relevant people to actually want your phone number, or be eager for your company and knowledge. Hey, how else are going to get your mug published in a newspaper or magazine when your past 50yo. Just remember, as a trainer or coach, every dumb, fit rube you meet is coming at this game for the first time, while you'll be on the other side of the same coin playing it for the 1000th, 1001st, 1002nd time etc. After a while, it becomes so easy you'll start to think you couldn't stuff it up if you tried.
     
  7. Brixton Bomber

    Brixton Bomber Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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  8. Jamal Perkins

    Jamal Perkins Well-Known Member Full Member

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    Snap i had 2 concussions within 6 months at 33...I took up judo as a replacement
     
  9. Jamal Perkins

    Jamal Perkins Well-Known Member Full Member

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    I'd say its an irrelevant mindset that refers to people needing to stay "relavent" when they dont or dismisses others as "irrelevent" based on their age.

    Otherwise nice post
     
  10. ecto55

    ecto55 להחזיר את ממלכת דוד Full Member

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    Hey JP, you do understand that I don't think what I wrote, I think the opposite of that. I was being facetious about the very people I despise in boxing.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2021 at 6:17 AM
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  11. ecto55

    ecto55 להחזיר את ממלכת דוד Full Member

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    ...or just do body-sparring. Still lose calories, see your ,mates, get the smell of the gym, you can keep your hand and eye in also just in case you need it...etc etc. Jabs to the head (to open each other up otherwise its just pointless) and everything else to the body. I've been put into an induced coma, had a bleed on the brain and was diagnosed with axon / axion? damage and still sparred despite 'experts' advice. Doctors have a bias against violence (naturally given they have to sow us up in ER) and this infects their attitude towards boxing. Even heading the ball in soccer is against the medical profession's advice.

    But there's ways around everything....if you lose your keys a lot, attach them to a teddy bear or fluffy toy. Hard to lose your keys when its that obvious. Have a checklist on your font door of things to have. I also have a pat-down routine I go through whenever I leave the room or property to check I have all my belonging. I do it if I'm out and about maybe 30 times a day to make sure I haven't left anything anyway...it looks stupid - tap, tap tap like I'm playing the drums on my own body but its how I confirm I have my phone, keys, wallet. Losing any is just too inconvenient.

    It just comes down to whether you want to be someone else or not. Your not going to end up like Jerry or Mike Quarry off being buzzed a few times and the brain can regenerate quite well. "Can't" is a funny word.
     
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  12. boxingscience

    boxingscience Boxing Addict Full Member

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    At 35 years old just do what you enjoy. It shouldn't be about being the best etc, it should be about releasing some steam and having fun, so yes of course you can join a new sport if it's something you want to do. Age is just a number, don't allow that number to dictate your happiness.
     
  13. Rafaman

    Rafaman Active Member Full Member

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    You look outside the paradigm of boxing and combat sports. There are many ways to train and we should train according to the ways that best serve our needs as we age. Once you hit your late 30s your spine and joints don't move as easily and the risk of injury increases. It also takes a lot longer to recover from even basic workouts. The body isn't made to train 5 days a week and run 40 kms a week forever. And its ok, our boxing ego is to never stop keep going and just take on challenges through sheer hard work. That won't help you as you age. You need an exercise regime that aids your health and lifestyle. Taking shots to the head continually is a recipe for disaster. By 40 you should have a family, loved ones and responsibilities, things you care about outside of the gym. Being tough and perfecting your boxing craft should not be the top of your list of priorities at that age.

    This is something I struggle with on a daily basis. Being 40 and having boxed since I was 23, boxing was my everything. But now I'm at peace not boxing. I do pilates reformer three times a week and do static kettlebell training twice a week (basic core movements). I still have the ego that wants to destroy training and smash someone but I know I'm doing these things to be healthy and strong for LIFE, for movement outside the gym in general. Pilates is gentle on the body and yes the mental skills we learnt as boxers applies totally. The discipline, the attention to detail, the concentration of mastering your own body are skills we can apply to anything now. You should be proud of your boxing, of the things you did when you could box. In Pilates they put us in very hard uncomfortable positions, that challenge your body and its the same mindset as boxing - will you quit ? how much can you handle? I if continue how good can I get? What can I do outside of the class to improve?. I just put my energy into something else. This is my new project where I focus my energies.

    Most people tell me I look great and that I look tough now, but I have that boxing mentality that unless I'm a chiseled 63kgs who was training 5 days a week well I'm nothing. Not true. We tested ourselves when most people were watching TV, we pushed and went to limits most people are afraid of. Find something you like doing. I loved running outside and just being in the cool air, so now I walk a lot. I put headphones on and enjoy myself. I don't have those expectations of going to the gym and training like a madman anymore. I do some light weights at home and always leave something in the tank. Let your body recover and give it time. I want to be a healthy 60 year old and that's what I train for now, the long goal.
     
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  14. Rafaman

    Rafaman Active Member Full Member

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    Great advice man. This is exactly what happened to me. I was that guy in his late 30s still training like a teenager still pushing very hard. I would go to the gym trying to prove myself to these high schoolers. A stupid mindset. I found myself more and more talking to the younger ones and telling them about training what I found did and didn't work. I noticed they really listened to me and then they would come for advice. I realised that in my nearly 20 years of boxing training I had learnt a lot. Several even asked for me to train them. I found myself coaching and teaching more than training myself. It is very fulfilling and seeing them succeed in any little way is a great feeling. In one way that is even a better feeling than when I trained myself. It helped my ego calm down and move away from the training myself.
     
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  15. ecto55

    ecto55 להחזיר את ממלכת דוד Full Member

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    Yeah, its good to give back. Sometimes its scary hearing what novices thinks / how little they know...and they'll never know unless someone helps them. It is rewarding, but as it progresses it can be tiresome in a lot of ways depending on the local comp's body, regulatory agency, officials competencies, politics and the like.

    Many good people just work in the gyms and refuse to attend am tournaments or pro shows anymore because of the bs politics and many a worthwhile person has just pulled up stumps and left the game, while curiously, its often the snakes and know-nothings who seem to stick around like some kind of weed.

    Still, everyone has to start somewhere, its just I wish that people eager to be this or that would do the hard yards first, whether its compete or even just being a dogsbody to a more knowledgeable, older trainer for a good long time (i.e. multiple years...not a couple of months and then try and pinch the stable!). Everyone's rushing, and rushing to be something in boxing before you are it is particularly dangerous.

    I re-read my earlier post...I know I had a point I was trying to make but I'm not even sure what it was now.
     
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