Why is the Tyson "PEEK-a-BOO" Style Not Popular??

Discussion in 'World Boxing Forum' started by Kiwi_in_America, May 14, 2020.


  1. Likethembigroundchunky

    Likethembigroundchunky New Member Full Member

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    How many of those are d'amato shifts (as shown in that above video) as opposed to good shifting footwork
     
  2. Kiwi_in_America

    Kiwi_in_America Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Tyson "drilled" those moves hundreds and hundreds of times.

    What was he doing in real fights? Running the same drills. Weaving, bobbing, advancing. Make the guy MISS. Sidestep and BAM - Hook to the head.

    If you are under 6 foot - and fit with some real power - it is the ideal style. Even tall guys should learn the DEFENSE side of it.
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2020
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  3. madballster

    madballster Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    Its ineffective against modern day HWs who are 6"5. You can peek a boo all you want while you are out of range but you will never inside effectively.
     
  4. On The Money

    On The Money Dangerous Journeyman Full Member

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    I'm not sure you can be a top level exclusively outside fighter if under 6'5", even if you have quick feet and hands you're going to have to get inside these giants.
     
  5. Kiwi_in_America

    Kiwi_in_America Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Tyson at his peak would blast them all.

    Every one of them.

    Go look again at his early fights against tall guys
     
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  6. jm2729v

    jm2729v Active Member Full Member

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    Because no one 5'10 would dare to be a heavyweight in todays division. Also, every trainer has a distinct style that they're fixed on, they'll coach out any natural flair or style a fighter has in favour of their system, this is especially the case with the British trainers.
     
  7. Likethembigroundchunky

    Likethembigroundchunky New Member Full Member

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    That is very true (and in lots of sports in Britain, not just boxing). For example julio cesar martinez would never have come out of England boxing.
     
  8. Kiwi_in_America

    Kiwi_in_America Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Why do modern trainers avoid this??
     
  9. Likethembigroundchunky

    Likethembigroundchunky New Member Full Member

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    Because they dont know how to do it.

    For example not one video I've ever found tells you how to punch like Tyson. Tyson would rotate at the waist, not the hips, to throw his long hooks.

    His hips would stay pretty much square to the opponent but his shoulders would over rotate (well past 90deg when really throwing). This would provide him with elastic recoil in his lower back. This momentum would also mean his rear leg would like to travel forward for balance, allowing him to naturally shift.

    Go into any amateur boxing gym and try it, theyll stop you straight away.
     
  10. jaytxxl

    jaytxxl Active Member Full Member

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    you have to have a certain level of determination, dedication, and almost elite athleticism to master that style.. A lot of guys lack one or the other similar to how guys wanted to mimic Floyd’s shoulder roll but failed for the same reasons..

    You gotta remember Tyson(Cus) and Floyd(Floyd Sr) went thru almost bootcamp style training to be able to continuously perform at a high level using those styles.. A lot of fighters aren’t willing to put in that work
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2020
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  11. dangerousity

    dangerousity Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    Because clinching. Why work your way in dodging all that incoming fire only to get clinched and then you have to restart that all over again.

    Fighters started using that on Tyson late in his career and he struggled more.

    You also need a lot of stamina to keep it up, explosiveness to be able to explode from the angles you create, great reflexes and a ton of discipline. Something all of which Tyson had (and lost later on particularly the discipline part).

    As someone said, it's much easier to be 6'5 and hold out your hand.

    When I fight shorter guys, it feels extremely easy, like they have this handicap. I have the range advantage so I can afford to make a mistake and STILL be out of danger-zone. When fighting taller guys and I employ the peak-a-boo style, it's almost like I got to fight the perfect fight, as I'm the one constantly in their range and one mistake could cost me.
     
  12. Kiwi_in_America

    Kiwi_in_America Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Almost all of it is based on pendulum-style WEAVING and SLIPPING

    Also you CROWD up close to the opponent and STIFLE his movement from being so close

    Make him MISS - then Bam!! - Counterstrike.

    It's not just Tyson that succesfully made it work.
     
  13. titanic

    titanic Boxing Addict Full Member

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    You answered your own question already, Cus D' Amato is gone, nobody can teach it properly and perfectly....
     
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  14. Kiwi_in_America

    Kiwi_in_America Boxing Addict Full Member

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    Actually - Teddy Atlas taught it well

    Others too, I'm sure
     
  15. mark ant

    mark ant Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    Tony Tucker was 6'5.
     


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