Would you say it's better to work on strength training and cardio one at a time, or separately

Discussion in 'Boxing Training' started by Grapefruit, Feb 27, 2018.


  1. Grapefruit

    Grapefruit Active Member Full Member

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    If your intention is on putting on lean muscle and lossing weight simulatinously should you do one first then the other, or is just as well to do it simultaneously. I heard several people tell me before you can't gain muscle if your doing cardio everyday, thoughts?
     
  2. JagOfTroy

    JagOfTroy Jag Full Member

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    Are you trying to compete or just look good? That's kinda how to figure out what your direction is.
     
  3. Grapefruit

    Grapefruit Active Member Full Member

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    No real intentions of competing, but i do work security full time so I want my body to be better prepared for confrontation, so to me looking good comes second to performing good.
     
  4. JagOfTroy

    JagOfTroy Jag Full Member

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    A lot of people basically talk out of their ass because the sources they read from are talking out of their ass.

    You can do cardio and put on lean mass, it just takes away from that calorie surplus that usually bodybuilders go for whereas a fighter needs to eat a balanced diet that doesn't go overboard or undercut their nutritional needs.
    I used to prefer doing my harder workout, then finish up with cardio because your engine will still be burning and it 'supposedly' helps to get leaner in regards to losing weight. Nowadays though, I focus a lot more on leg durability so I start with runs, then go through the rest of training with shadow boxing/sparring/footwork/bag work.
     
  5. Butch Coolidge

    Butch Coolidge Boxing Addict Full Member

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    meh, just do Spartacus 2.0 and you're money.
     
  6. Rafaman

    Rafaman Active Member Full Member

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    The common professional approach is to spilt them up. This is to allow them to be measureable and properly monitored and its called "periodization". You want to be fresh and you want to compare performances over time and hopefully be seeing improvements in numbers. For example one week try a 5 km run and test the time. Work on smaller sprints over a 2 week interval plus a few longer runs, then test that 5 km time. If you are faster then you have improved, boxers would be doing this peaking towards a fight. This type of training will be really burn fat and you physique should signs of that. Same with weights. You can try higher weights but not necessarily always new PRs when training for a fight. In the ring is what ultimately matters. For example, how many times can you bench press a certain weight that is heavy enough for you. E.g. I can bench press 90kgs 200lbs for 2 reps. So my goal in 6 weeks is to get that number of reps up to 6 or 7. So you have become measurably more stronger over that period.

    If you don't spilt them up your statistics will be compromised and hard to actually tell what's going on. For example Box intensely for 45 minutes and then try that 5km test. You result will obviously be nowhere near fast and will fluctuate too much to be accurate.

    Alternatively, you can still do this with strength/circuit training. Because you can also go for time or do the same workout but increase reps or higher weights and if your time is still decent you are stronger. In my 20s I did whats called the filthy 50. Basically the Kettlebell never touches the ground and you go through about 10 different exercises of 50 until you hit 500 reps in total for time. If my time was faster will I was in better condition.

    I wouldn't worry about muscle gain. I trained like this for about 10 years 5 days a week and got in really great shape. Not bodybuilder big but was lean around 8% at all times. I'm not part of this IG generation so I wont post photos of all that but I have them as proof. Your muscle will be functional and you will be muscular in the places that you need to be. But the caution is that you can get carried away with all the numbers when boxing is and always will be a skill based sports. I was guilty of that. I destroyed those filthy 50s and ran the 5km in under 18 mins, could do 500 pushups in a single session and was the pullup king at the gym. But I still got my ass handed to me by hungry tough teenage amateur fighters who I couldn't touch in the ring. I have a short wrestlers type body and loved all those strength training, its was very natural to me but a fighter the same weight faster and longer reach with experience is still all those things. Over time I found the running and endurance was the best tool to aid my boxing. If you read a lot of the Russian and Cuban training protocols you will find a heavy emphasis on skills work, lots of shadow boxing and drills. They matter much more in the ring if that is your goal.

    The other point I would stress is you are only human. Training smart and knowing what you can actually do is key. As boxers we think overtraining is just normal but its not. Be aware of potential injuries and some times believe it or not just rest, don't do anything maybe just a walk on the off days (obviously the proviso in this is that you are training the house down in the other session) but rest is so pivotal to your progress as we aren't machines.
     
  7. Rafaman

    Rafaman Active Member Full Member

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    Sounds like BJJ would be perfect for that. Lots of body locks and grappling to neutralise an opponent. Most of those security confrontations would be very short and explosive right? You won't be going toe-to-toe with someone on the street for more than 1 minute. Better to wrap them up than break a hand, or worse damage someone badly and face legal action. The ground game is perfect for that plus can really aid in attacks vs much heavier guys. I really enjoyed BJJ and loved the fact you don't get smashed in the face all the time. Its surprising how strong you get, because its all real live wrestling/grappling. Only downside is how long it takes. Its a real art form and in the first 2-3 years you will still only be scratching the surface as they often teach only ONE move per lesson. And per move their is like 5-6 defences which aren't taught etc. You have to dedicate a massive amount of time to learn. Much more than boxing, as in boxing you will be punching-on very soon even as a beginner.
     
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  8. Texascyclone

    Texascyclone Member Full Member

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    Great advice Rafa. I've been studying the Russian Olympic workouts in the AIBA training manual on this site and its really good stuff for improving boxing skills. The dribbling tennis balls is one of the best agility hand eye drills I have used. Wish I would have discovered it earlier. As far as getting the best of both worlds, I would recommend alternating a plyometric/strength coupled with sprints workout with a boxing or BJJ workout followed by 2-3 mile run. Do 3 of each per week with one day of complete rest. Keep total workout time to around an hour each day and I think you will get the benefits of both without overtraining. Good Luck!
     


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