How To Use The Jab

Discussion in 'Boxing Training' started by greynotsoold, Jun 7, 2024.



  1. cross_trainer

    cross_trainer Liston was good, but no "Tire Iron" Jones Full Member

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    I have a jab question arising from conversations with two of you gentlemen via PM.

    Both in his book and apparently sometimes as part of his normal approach, Joe Frazier seemed to plant his left foot when throwing the left hook, and push off with his rear (right) foot. As I understand it, this is the reverse of the typical way the left hook is done.

    @Pat M characterized doing this as not throwing a left hook at all, but a "bent armed jab."

    My questions would be:

    - Were Frazier's version of left hooks bent-armed jabs, or should they still be considered left hooks?

    - Did anyone else throw a "jab" like this? Is it used by other boxers?

    - Is throwing this kind of punch useful, or are fighters better served by more conventional ones? Are there any advantages to throwing it that way? (Aside from it being better suited to Frazier's long-injured arm, I assume.)
     
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  2. Pat M

    Pat M Active Member Full Member

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    JF was successful and if that's what he did, it worked for him. A typical hook involves a pivot with the left foot and a transfer of weight to the right foot. If JF really threw his left hook and kept his weight on the front foot, he'd probably have been more powerful and balanced with a weight transfer to the rear foot. From what you are describing I'd consider that punch more of a bent armed jab than a true hook.

    We had a southpaw who threw a right hook that way. It still was a hard punch, but it would have been much harder if he transferred his weight. I saw a video of him in a street fight later (after he stopped boxing) and he hit a guy who had a big, block head with his right hand, he knocked the guy out on his feet but didn't knock him down. When I saw him I told him I saw the video and he still left his weight on the front foot. It probably saved the guy he was fighting some medical bills.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2024
  3. Journeyman92

    Journeyman92 A L O H A Full Member

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    In my know nothing opinion If you throw your hook off of your lead foot with no shift of weight the pivotal point becomes your front leg so it castrates your right.
    I also think when you throw it this way you lose concussive force because your weight isn’t “whipped through” rather “at” if that makes sense?
     
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  4. cross_trainer

    cross_trainer Liston was good, but no "Tire Iron" Jones Full Member

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    It does make sense. And also puts Frazier's fights into an interesting light, since it explains how he wasn't known for having much of a right, how Ali absorbed so many "left hooks" without going down, etc. It also fits with how Frazier's arm was apparently injured in a way that prevented him from fully extending it in a jab; maybe Frazier wouldn't have developed his left pseudo-hook if he hadn't needed a jab substitute.

    Does throwing a left pseudo-hook / bent arm jab like that allow the person doing it to double up on the hook easily? The weight transfer sequence seems like it would be the same as a regular jab-hook combination: lead foot planted with hip rotation and back leg pushing off, followed by the weight going slightly back while the front foot rotates.
     
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  5. Journeyman92

    Journeyman92 A L O H A Full Member

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    I don’t think it makes it easier or faster I think functionally you probably can still double up.
    I don’t think there is a con to punching properly or a useful pro to doing otherwise - you can be faster slapping and cuffing the way a lot of speedsters have or you can punch short the way Louis did and hurt people.
    Shifting your weight is bedrock foundational stuff. Think of this if you aren’t punching from the hips (shifting the weight) your head won’t move or it will but minimally. That is very important for certain attacks.
    Even Frazier defence his ducking and rolling do you notice the consistent separation between when he’s attacking and when he’s avoiding punches?
    I think Frazier might be a good example of what @greynotsoold has spoken about where guys take turns punching (clarify if I’m wrong my friend)
    Think about this too… if you throw your left hook and you want to weave correctly - you slide your left foot left when the rear leg has the weight then you chase that weight to hit them with a right uppercut to the body on the way through - If you tried it with all the weight on the front leg what happens?
    Note I am not the best communicator and am willing to clarify but I am a know nothing so please perhaps check with the knowledgeable responses to this post.
     
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  6. Pat M

    Pat M Active Member Full Member

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    Another problem with leaving the weight on the front foot will occur if you miss the left hand. If you let your weight transfer to the right foot and miss you can push off the right foot "roll" back under to your left and do it again. You'll be balanced and in a strong position. But if your weight is on your left foot (front), it would be difficult to reset. A miss would probably leave you hanging in a position where the other guy can counter with a right hand.
    Leaving the weight on the front foot may also make the person more likely to let his head get past his knee. That affects balance and will leave a person vulnerable defensively. Some people make something they do wrong "work" for them, but just because it worked for them doesn't mean that someone else should copy it or teach it to others. Good body mechanics and technique will give a person an edge over the guy who makes something work that he is doing wrong.