Why did Louis go down against Galento, Baer, Braddock, and Walcott?

Discussion in 'Classic Boxing Forum' started by mrkoolkevin, Jan 8, 2019.



  1. TBI

    TBI Active Member Full Member

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    I did, and it was on the whole. He did fight world class guys though.
     
  2. Grapefruit

    Grapefruit Active Member Full Member

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    Louis is remembered as a atg for his accomplishments for his time, as well as he had the best killer instincts and possibly the best coordination in heavyweight history, he had flaws in other aspects such as his chin wasn't great and he was slow on his feet and wasnt great at dodging punches either really, but no man had everything and Louis more than made up for it in other aspects.
     
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  3. reznick

    reznick Boxing Junkie Full Member

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    It was because of his slow shuffling feet.
     
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  4. mrkoolkevin

    mrkoolkevin Not here for the fairy tales Full Member

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    Sounds about right:
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    Walcott took advantage of the fact that Louis kept his left too low (and timed a lazy jab during one knockdown).
     
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  5. JohnThomas1

    JohnThomas1 Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    Meticulous countering from Walcott in that second one, beautiful. It was a huge punch, catching Louis coming in with perfect weight transfer from Walcott and immense leverage.
     
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  6. mrkoolkevin

    mrkoolkevin Not here for the fairy tales Full Member

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    Looked like Walcott saw the same flaw that Schmeling saw so many years earlier. Beautiful punch indeed.
     
  7. janitor

    janitor Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    Schmeling himself noted that Louis continued to make the same mistake later in his career.

    It is only fair to note however, that Louis's reactions were slowing down by then.
     
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  8. mcvey

    mcvey Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    They had 170 kos between them, so they were hardly powder puff punchers.
     
  9. JohnThomas1

    JohnThomas1 Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    I think it was just a perfect punch from Walcott that took great skill and timing to employ. Louis was already throwing the right hand behind the jab and Walcott just beat him to the punch with supreme precision and skill. The more i look at it the more impressed i am with Walcott. He used to drop Louis in sparring too. Great skill with big power.
     
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  10. mcvey

    mcvey Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    Schmeling spotted that Louis did not bring his left hand back into position after throwing the jab.
     
  11. mrkoolkevin

    mrkoolkevin Not here for the fairy tales Full Member

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    That’s what Walcott took advantage of in the second clip I posted. Louis dropped his left and then stepped in to follow up with a right, with his left still down by his trunks.

    Louis also kept his left low and face completely exposed during the exchange in the first clip.
     
  12. mrkoolkevin

    mrkoolkevin Not here for the fairy tales Full Member

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    I don’t know that he ever would have been able to react to those punches—he was completely focused on getting his punches off and his left was too far from his face to be of any help.
     
  13. Man_Machine

    Man_Machine Boxing Addict Full Member

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    I do wonder sometimes, given the sequence of events; Walcott's positioning, timing and delivery, whether that counter-right could have been defended against, effectively, anyway.
     
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  14. JohnThomas1

    JohnThomas1 Obsessed with Boxing Full Member

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    There are thousands of examples of great fighters throwing one-two's where their left never gets back anywhere near their face. Louis was caught with a perfect counter. Fighters get hit. If they did everything perfect to this nth degree they'd barely cop a blow to the head. There's every chance Louis was also going with the hook next and his hand was already in great position if so. Many throw this combo and the left is low starting the hook. Carlos Monzon can be seen having a low left time and again when throwing a one two and he has one of the great one two's. it time and again. Even good technicians like Arguello do it. Gomez did it. Holmes is another fine example even when not crossing with the right.



    Here's Joshua never getting it back -

     
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  15. mrkoolkevin

    mrkoolkevin Not here for the fairy tales Full Member

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    He could have defended against it effectively if he’d brought his left back up. He had plenty of time to do so. It’s not like Walcott jumped on the punch immediately and punched over it Floyd Mayweather style as Louis was still finishing the punch.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019

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